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Full text of "Antioch News 11/01/1996"

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fiririOCH TOtiHSHIP UBRMK 
757 HftIK STREET 
flrttiocSi 



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11 60D02 



■^^^pcH-PUiRur-LlBBAFity- DISTRICT 
757 N. Main Street 




VOL. 110 NO. 4? 




ANTIOCH NOVEMBER 1, 1996 



THREE SECTIONS-68 PAGES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 

©1996-A Schroedsr Pubfcatlon 



50 CENTS 



Healer of spirit 

'AnER 
nurse left one 
type of 
healthcare lo 
enter another 
by founding 
a business 
based on 
healing 
through alternative methods. 
Susan Roos Bockwinkel has now 
entered another field and 
written a novel about a young 
girl's spiritual journey. 

—For more, see Page Bl 








Rooted in County 

Lake Cou nry's own Aj Salvi, 
candidate for U.S. Senate, steps ■' 
jfromlhe early shadows of die ... 

capturc'thc stale iii Tuesday's 
election. A large Cadiolic family 
has Influenced this candidate in; 
.his choices.- . . 

— For more, see Page CI 

Election guide 

Information on aU local 
races is listed for die Nov. 5 
election. Candidates on the Nov. 
5 ballot are profiled in the 
Election Guide to help voters 
make informed choices . - 
—For more,, see Page CU 



1 INI PEX : 



Bwk & FiNANCE C9 

Business.... C7 

CtAssifiEd .......C20. 

County News..-..,.. Bl 

CrossworcI Bl ? 

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HEAlihwMch :B17 

Home ■& CarcIen : . . B 1 4 

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W*l€RLEi TO e^ll 
Lidcchuiil iVewsimjVers 

(847)223-8161 

FAX (847)223-8810 
e-mnil: cdiKL'lhd.cbm. 



Osmond runs 
for supervisor 

ALECIUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

An Antioch Township trustee is the first to 
announce he is running for township 
supervisor in the 1ST97 election. 

Timothy Osmond, a trustee for eight 
years; said he is seeking the supervisor post. 
Osmond says his blend of experience and 
political connections makes him the best 
candidate for the job. 



'Jim (Fields) has 
always helped 
those in need. 
That is one of 

the functions of 
the office, to 

help those down 
on their luck.' 

Tim Osmond 



"F know and have worked with state 
Senator Adeline Geo Karis and State 
Representative Robert Churchill. I know 
them well," Osmond added. 

Osmond added he wants to serve all 

township residents. In that vein, he will be 

attending more village board meetings. He 

feels he has had a good working relationship 

with village officials for 20 years and hopes to 
continue- - .;,'.';". Uii.-- 

He feels township government will be 
taking on a greater role inthe next four years 
as more welfare and social programs ore 
shifted from the federal government to the 
states and down to the township level. 

"I want to be aggressive in obtaining grant 
money that is available," Osmond said. 

Osmond is a graduate of Antioch 
See OSMOND page A10 





Will Mr. Salvi go to Washington? 

Lake Zurich native VM Salvi, candidate for U.S. Senate from Illinois, is spending the 
last'days of his. campaign traveling throughout Illinois in a motorhorne with his 
wife, Kathy, and five children. Making a stop in Lake County/ Al Salvi talks to 
supporters under the Lake Bluff pavilion. Children from the Forest Bl.urTrylontessorr 
School surround him with signs and cheers.— Photo by Linda Chapman. 




Ghostbuster 

Katrina Kazumura, 3, of Antioch, successfully throws a ghost 
at a witch hanging from a tree to win a prize at the Happy 
Haunted Graveyard during Halloween Howl in downtown 
Antioch. —Photo by Sandy Bressner 



Free downtown parking 

♦ Saying parking meters are unfriendly, the 
village has implemented a plan allowing free 
parking for two to six hours 

ALEC IUNCE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch residents will no longer have to dig in their pockets to find 
change to plug the parking meter. 

A comprehensive parking plan begins Nov. 1, It will allow people 
the opportunity to park tree for a two- to six-hour period depending 
on where they park. Village officials fett it was time to provide 
something that would draw people to the downtown area. 

"I've been to several downtown seminars and they all say parking 
* meters are unfriendly as far as shopping goes," said Claude LeMere, 
community development director. 

LeMere noted many of the people that shop in Antioch are out-of- 
towners. 

"Most of the businesses in the downtown that are doing well are 
the specialty stores. Many of the people are coming from out of town 
and spending most of the day shopping at these specialty shops," he 
said. 

"The intent of the plan is to provide easily accessible, free parking 
for all of our residents and guests, and to provide areas for business 
owners and workers to park leaving prime, convenient spaces for our 
residents," said a statement by the village board. 

Under the new plan Lake Street, Main Street and Toft Avenue will 
all have two hour parking. The municipal lot off Toft, directly behind 
Antioch Schwinn and Canton Sea Garden will have two-hour free 
parking with the exception of three spaces d i rectly behind the park 
walkway. 

The municipal lot behind Ben Franklin will have two-hour, six- 
hour and permit parking. The lot behind B.J's will have six- hour and 
permit parking. 

Those parking in two-hour spaces need to know if they move to 
another location it must be at least 500 feet away for them to avoid 
See PARKING pageAlO 



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NovEMbcn 1, 1996 UkclANd Newspapers K 




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^ GoMMUNITy ] — — — . , ^_ 

McDonald Woods Forest Preserve, a hidden treasure 



«»' 



ALEC IUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

A lot of local residents have 
seen the sign for the McDonald 
Woods Forest Preserve on Grass 
Lake Road and just drive by. 

What's missed is a piece of 
the area's history as well as 
some of the most scenic views in 
the county. 

McDonald Woods is derived 
from property owned by Realtor Among the restoration work is 
Arthur McDonald, who eventu- planting of prairie seeds and 
ally owned 225 acres of the cur- removal of invasive brush 
rent 295-acre preserve. It is species which prevent native 



open fields. 

. "On one trail, within 100 feet 
you move from a woodland to a 
prairie," she said. 

McDonald did alter the land. 
He created a system of dams for 
water level control, planted 
pine trees and multi-floral in 
the 1950s; The , Forest 

Preserve is doing its part to alter 
the site back to its former state. 



located on Grass 
Lake Road about 
a mile west of 
Route 45. 

The preserve 
land had been a 
timber lot for. 
farmers in the 
area. 

McDonald 
lived in a white house on Route 



'You have a sloping 

effect and can see 

beautiful views 

ahead of you/ 

Lynn Hepler 



plants and grass- 
es from growing. 
For recreation, 
there is a 3.5 mile 
bicycle trail and 
a 4.5 mile trail 
for hiking and 
cross country 
skiing in the win- 
ter. 
In addition, an agreement 



45, which is now Revenaugh's with the Village of Lindenhurst 



Art Gallery, where he operated 
the A.B. McDonald Real Estate 
business. He lived in the 
Waukegan area before he began 
purchasing land in Lake Villa 
Township. 

McDonald Woods has its 
own character among the coun- 
ty's forest preserves. 

"It is different in that it has 
ravines which are. unusual in 



and Westfield Homes will even- 
tually allow the trail to extend 
through the historic Bonner 
Farm which dates back to the 
mid -1800s. 

The trail will also eventually 
connect with the Rollins 
Savannah. 

Most of the land was pur- 
chased in 1974 for its natural 
features. A 50-acre oak wood- 



central Lake County," said Lynn land was bought in 1988. 



Hepler of the Lake County 
Forest Preserve. "You have a 
sloping effect and can see beau- 
tiful views ahead of you." 

Hepler said McDonald 
Woods has a nice combination 
of mature woodlands, sloping 
trails, prairies, a marsh and 



There are bluebird boxes to 
attract the rare birds. 

Other wildlife include deer, 
coyote, fox, muskrats, squirrels 
and rabbits. 

"A lot of waterfowl rest there 
because .it is quiet and 'there is 
no boat traffic," Hepler said. 



Biiifs 



Drug Awareness Night 

- Antioch Junior Women's Club is sponsoring a Drug 
Awareness Night /Tuesday, Nov. 12 at Antioch Upper Grade 
School cafeteria at 7:30 p.m. All parents and teachers are 
encouraged to attend and all adults are welcome. Speakers 
include Cathy Cratty, director of Student and Employee 
Assistance Programs District 113, and members of the Deefield 
and Antioch police departments. 

Footlights oil the horizon 

St, Peter in Antioch is hosting its Footlights extravaganza on 
Nov. 8,, Nov. 9, Nov. 15 and!6. It includes 10. rooms of dancing, 
singing, entertainment, and casino gambling. New this year will 
'be a comedy club and New Orleans style riverboat room featur- 
ing continuous "Dixie style" entertainment. The. Grease Band, 
PM&L and the Lips Inc. crew are just a few of the entertainers. A 
full casino includes blackjack, craps and poker will be ready'. 
Tickets at $10 each of the Friday Evenings and $12 each for the 
Saturday evenings. For advance tickets or for more information 
call 395-0274. 



Antioch News-Reporter 



Founded 1886 

Offlco of Publicallon: 30 Soulh Whltnoy St., Gray6lako, IL 60030. Phono (847)223-9161. 

Published weekly, periodical mall postage paid al GrBystoke, IL 60030. 

Mall Subscription Rales: S24.50 Pet Yoar by Mall paid In advance In Lake, Cook, Kenosha and 

McHonry Counties; olsowhero $35.00 Per Year by Mall paid In advance. 

P os I master; Send address changes to Anlloch News-Reporter, 30 Soulh Whitney Street, P.O. Box 268, 

Graystake, Illinois 60030. gm 



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Modi News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundetein News 
Grayslake Times 
Fox Lake Press 



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Founder-1 904-1 986 

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Publisher/President 

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General Manager 

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Vernon Hills News 
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The state-endangered pied- 
billed grebe has also been spot- 
ted in the marshes, the preserve 
is listed in the Illinois Nature 
Inventory because of the rare 
birds. 

Before European settlement 



in the 1830s, the western half.of 
the preserve was oak woodland, 
and the eastern half was oak 
savanna, burr oaks with a 
prairie understory. 

The Forest Preserve is now 
working to restore McDonald 



Woods to show the variety of 
habitats which existed before 
European settlement. A.B. 
McDonald' died in the mid 
1960s and it was his wish to 
keep the land from being devel- 
oped. 




Family members, even the four-legged ones, enjoy a brisk hike on the trail at McDonald Woods. — 
Photo courtesy of Lake County Forest Preserves 

Lower Grade safer through cooperation 



ALEC JUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

With the assistance of Antioch 
police, dismissal time at Antioch 
Lower Grade School is much safer 
and smoother for all concerned. 

The school, which is located 
on a increasingly busy Route 83, 
was having concerns about safety 
with young children and many 
vehicles trying to get in and out 
around the same time period. 

"This had the potential to be 
an accident waiting to happen," 
said Dr. Daniel Burke, superin- 
tendent of District 34. "Now we 



feel it's an accident prevented." 

The village board approved 
stationing an officer at the school 
during dismissal time. A trial peri- 
od of 10 days proved how effec- 
tively this could work, according 
to Burke. 

"Parents are driving slower 
knowing there is an officer there. 
With the officer, there is control 
and people are now driving more 
safely," Burke said. 

Burke added Principal Mary 
Kay McNeill told him the parking 
lot is cleared out in about seven 
minutes every day. 



This effort is just one example 
of the village and the school 
working together. Three years 
ago, Village Administrator Tim 
Wells and Village Engineer John 
Boldt gave tips to help improve 
the parking lot and make the traf- 
fic flow better. 

Burke said it was their sugges- 
tions and support from the village 
which lead to a bus drop off at the 
Depot Street. 

He said a conversation with 
Wells lead to a suggestion to try 
an officer directing traffic at the" 
school. 



No simple solution for St. Peter crossing 



ALECjUNGE 



5taff Reporter 

Antioch trustees are back to 
the drawing board as they search 
for a solution to pedestrian cross- 
ing problem at Rte. 173 near St. 
Peters. 

Trustees directed Tim Wells, 
village administrator, and John 
Boldt, village engineer to view the 
site and provide suggestions to 
the board. Boldt remarked they 
both couldn't find a ready solu- 
tion. 



"No matter where you put it, 
you still have the dangerous 
curve," Boldt said. 

Trustees realize on Sundays 
the traffic is quite busy and park- 
ing is at a premium. Some people 
are attempting to cross the street 
from Struggles Restaurant to the 
church. That location is near a 
curve and creates a site problem 
for drivers. 

Trustee Dorothy Larson sug- 
gested warning residents not to 
cross at that point and use the 



existing crosswalks. 

The request was brought up 
about two months ago by 
Trustee Ron Cunningham after 
he saw a senior citizen have 
great difficulty attempting to 
cross Rte. 173. 

Boldt added no matter what 
direction he and Wells viewed the 
possible crosswalks, it would be a 
problem. 

The board agreed to explore 
the issue further but decide on 
any action at this time. 



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UkElANd Newspapers NovemBer 1, 1996 




ni 




Emmons Book Fair coming 

Emmons School is having a book fair from Nov. 5-8. School 
officials encourage people to browse through the many educa- 
tional selections. The times are 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Nov. 5-6, 1-9 
. p:rn. Nov. 7 and 1-6 p.m. Nov. 8. 

Save those box tops 

District 34 PTSO is collecting General Mills box tops through 
Dec. 19. They ask parents to please save the box tops as they are 
collected once a month. Each top is worth 15 cents per box. The 
goal is to raise $200 this year. 

Report cards come home 

District 34 report cards will be sent home with all K-5 stu- 
dents on Nov. 5; 

Petty Music program ahead 

A vocal music program is planned at W. C. Petty School for 
Wednesday, Nov. 20. 

No School on Veteran's Day 

District 34 schools will be closed Nov. 11 in observance of 
Veterans Day. 





Its me talk of the town 



1 1 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriTiiinnTOrri 



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Dist. 34 goes red for anti-drug week 



District 34 schools did their part in commemo- 
rating an anti-drug week with all sorts of activities. 

The district participated in "Red Ribbon Week," 
Oct. 23-31 to honor Drug Enforcement Officer 
Enrique Camerena who was slain by Mexican drug 
dealers. Everything from essays, to posters and 
making ribbons mark this week. 

Besides doing many activities, students have 
received recognition for their efforts. A third-grade 
class in Oakland School won first place in a county 
collage contest. Tracy Klean took first place for her 
essay in the seventh-grade division white Shannon 
George earned first place in her age group. 

Students at Antioch Grade School and 
Oakland wore red ribbons all week stating 
"Winners Don't Do Drugs." At the end of the 
week they signed the back of the their individual 
ribbons along with the person they would like to 
be healthy and drug free. The ribbons are then 



sent to President Clinton. 

Other drug prevention activities include doing 
the "Red Ribbon" coloring book "Count on Me to 
be Drug Free," posters, drug-free'pledges and a red 
balloon release. 

Students from Antioch Upper Grade visited 
third-grade classes to read and discuss the book 
"The Red Ribbon" by John Lasne, 

Students at W.C. Petty and Antioch Upper 
Grade will wear red and white friendship bracelets 
and decorate the Antioch commuter station and 
pass out red ribbons to commuters. 

Antioch Community High School students went 
to sixth-grade classes delivering drug prevention 
messages while encouraging healthy choices and 
lifestyles. 

These activities are planned to reinforce drug 
education and prevention that is a yearlong 
process for all students. 

/ 



Geo-Karis: State releases funds to schools 



Local school districts this 
week received more than 
$731,000 in state funds that 
would have been lost without the 
efforts the Illinois Republicans, 
said State Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis. 



Sen. Geo-Karis and other 
Republican lawmakers fought to 
add a "hold harmless" to this 
year's education funding. This 
provision guarantees that no 
school district in Illinois will 



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receive less funding this year 
than in the previous school year. 

"Education is one area where 
we cannot afford to cut back on 
spending/' said Geo-Karis (R- 
Zion). "Schools rely heavily on 
state funding to provide a quality 
education for our children. 
Without this additional funding, 
many schools would have lost 
funding this year. I fought hard to 
make sure that every school in 
this district would not receive less 
money than it did last year." 

Thirty-first district schools 
that would have lost funding 
without the "hold harmless" 
include: Zion $231,089.81; 
Millbum CC $31,436.65; 

Emmons $11,012.49; Lake Villa 
CC $79,329.77; Fox Lake Grade 
SD114 $3,202.62; Grant 
Community HS $3,698.97; 
Lfbertyville Community HS 
$365,750.31. 

Schools 
recognized 
for attendance 

Elementary schools from 
across Lake County participated in 
the Eighth Annual Lake County 
Elementary School Fall Attendance 
Week, Oct. 7 to 1 1 , which was spon- 
sored by Project PASS (Lake County 
Center for Dropout Prevention) 
and Edward Gonwa, Lake County 
regional superintendent of schools. 

The top ten reporting schools 
were: Green Day School, North 
Chicago; Adler Park School, 
Libertyville; Copeland Manor 
School, Libertyville; Oak Grove 
School, Green Oaks; , Hawthorn 
Junior High School, Vernon Hills; 
Glen Flora School, Waukegan; 
Hawthorn Intermediate School, 
Vernon Hills; Stanton School, Fox 
Lake; Arnett Lines School, 
Barrington; and Woodview School, 
Grayslake. 

Retired teachers 
meets Nov. 12 

The Retired Teachers' 
Association of Lake County will 
hold a buffet luncheon meeting 
Tuesday, Nov. 12, at noon at the 
Meadows 21 Restaurant, 1760 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville. Apre- 
luncheon social will begin at 11:30 
a.m. The program will be presented 
by Allen Kagarf, a pharmacist from 
Wooddale. Kagan will discuss the 
problems of drug interaction and 
drugs on the market for vascular 
diseases, his address Is being spon- 
sored by the organization's health 
committee. 

Reservations are not required. 
Call 662-5314 for information. 



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Persons charged 'with, a crime are innocent unit! proven guilty in a 
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NoVEMbER 1, 1996 UktlANd NEWSpApERS 



Shopper claims harassment 




1 



Arrested for DUI 

Anton Feitz, .69, 11907 256th Ave., Trevor, on Oct. 24, was 
arrested for driving under the influence. He failed field sobriety . 
tests and refused a breath test. 

Arrested for driving offense 

• Daniel Davis, 20, 889 Main, Aritioch, on Oct. 24 was arrested 
for driving with a suspended license and speeding. He was 
stopped for driving.32 mph in a 20 mph zone. He was found to 
have a suspended license. - 

Charles Branham, 37, 981 Freeman, Genoa City, on Oct. 23, 
was arrested for driving with a suspended license. He was 
stopped for no rear registration light' and was found to have a, 
suspended license. 

Arrested on warrants 

Daniel Clark, 20, 1004 Cedar Lake, Round Lake Beach, on 
Oct, 23, was arrested on three warrants. 'He was spotted walking 
>; on a sidewalk and the officer recognized him and that he had 
warrants. He was arrested on three warrants. One of them was 
for criminal trespass and two others were battery counts. 

LINDENHURST 

Arrested for DO 

Richard Jones, 28, 34844 Park, Ingleside, on Oct. 24, was 
arrested for driving under the influence, driving with a suspend- 
ed license, improper lane usage and speeding. He- was clocked 
driving 71 mph in a 45 mph zone. He failed field sobriety test' 
and refused a breath test. 

Party broken up 

A loud party was broken up in the 2200 block of Federal 
Parkway on Oct., 24. Police estimate between 75 and 100 indi- 
viduals left the house after police arrived. Police were unable to 
find'the owner of the home. 

GRAYSLAKE 

Drivers charged for DUI 

DavIclMyrick43,' of Take Villa was arrested for driving under 
the influence Oct. 24 at 2:53 p.m. in the parking lot of the 
Grayslake District 46 office on Barron Boulevard. Police were 
notified of Myrick being slumped over the steering wheel of his 
car and when they arrived they discovered he was intoxicated. 
He was released on bond. 

Jeffrey. C. Frederick 36, of St. Charles was arrested for driving 
under the influence, obstruction and resisting arrest Oct. 25 at 
the Clark Gas Station, 737 E. Belvidere. Following a property 
damage accident the officer tried to take a report and Frederick 
became abusive, according to the police report. 

Patrick J. Jenkinson 25, of Crystal Lake was charged with 
driving under the influence Oct. 27 at Prairie Crossing subdivi- 
sion and Potowatomi. 

Jessie L Connors 27, of Mississippi was arrested for driving 
under the influence and improper lane use Oct. 27, at the Shell 
gas station on Belvidere Road. 

911 call gets two charged 

Guiseppe Inoomenico 34, of Lake Shore Drive, Round Lake 
was arrested Oct. 27 for possession of cannabis when officers 
responded to a 91 1 misdial in the 300 block of Neville Drive. 

Upon arrival they found several intoxicated subjects causing a 
disturbance and arrested Indbmenico. He was also charged with 
domestic battery and possession of a firearm without an FOID card, 
Lora Williams 35, with an unknown address, was also charged with 
battery and obstructing a police officer. '.-' 

Jndomenico was arrested again early the next day Oct 28 at 1:09 
a.m. for disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and violation of bail for 
yelling in the hallways of the same apartment building on Neville Drive. 

Doctor impersonation 

An apparent impersonation has a Mexican man under investi- 
gation after he reportedly posed as a licensed physician from 
'Mexico and dispensed drugs to someone. Apparently the sub- 
stances weren't scheduled drugs or controlled substances. The inci- 
dent is being referred to the Attorney Generals office. The incident 
was reported Oct. 26 as occurring at Brittany Square. 




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TINA LYNN SWIECH 
Staff Reporter 

A couple of women using 
the washroom at a Round Lake 
Beach 7-Eleven store allege 
they were treated unusually, 
and cite lewd behavior by the 
store attendant. 

After claims o.f being 
grabbed, one of the women 
signed a complaint with police 
and subsequently the offender- 
was arrested. 

The store employee, Pervez 
Akhtar, 47, of 700 Hollywood, 
Mundelein was charged earlier 
this week with battery.' 
• On Oct. 19 around 11 p.m., 
police responded to the conve- 
nience store on Rollins Road, in 
which a Lindenhurst woman 
was apparently "crying and 
shaking" according to reports. 

Her friend, a Waukegan 
woman, attempted to tell 
police what happened, but the 
victim refused to report much, 
nor did she wish to sign a com- 
plaint against the store clerk. 

Police did get comments 
from the witness (Waukegan 
woman) who said when the 
Lindenhurst woman asked" to 
use the washroom facilities, 
she was told she could, but she 
had to leave the door open. The 
witness then said the clerk was 
viewing the victim while she 
was in the washroom. . 

The 47-year-old clerk told 
police the extent of their touch- 
ing was that "the woman was 
only trying to dance" with him, 



before "pleading" to use the 
bathroom. 

The 7-Eleven employee also 
told authorities he did advise 
the woman that he would close 
the exterior door to the main 
store area, but she should not 
close the door to the wash- 
room. 

Two days later, the 
Lindenhurst woman did file a 
report with police, and 
explained in her own words 
what happened. 

The woman said after using 
the bathroom in which the 
clerk told her to. keep the door 
ajar with a plastic container, 
she was approached by him 
from the side. She said the 



rWRiTE US 



clerk then patted her breasts 
and back, asking her if she felt 
better. 

The complainant said "yes" 
and moved away, according to 
reports. Once again the clerk 
approached her from the side 
as she was viewing the donuts, 
and he grabbed her and 
attempted to kiss, the woman. 

She pushed him away and 
yelled at the- clerk, the woman 
told police. 

Her friend came out of the 
washroom at this time, and the 
two left the store. 

No one was charged. The 
clerk advised police he would 
keep the store video tape for 
any further use. . - 



Lakeland Newspapers wants to hear news of local sporting 
events, clubs, organizations, etc. Black and white photos are 
also welcome. Please send news items to Claudia M. Lenart 
30 S. Whitney, Grayslake, 60030 or call 223-8161. 




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UkElANd Newspapers November 1, 1996 



New ArrjvaIs 









Brlttiny Marie Carlson 

A daughter, Brittiny Marie, was born Sept. 24 at Condell Medical 
Center to Ronda Schaefer and David Carlson of Antioch. Grandparents 
are Jhon and Nancy Carlson of Antioch, Linda Crane of Lake Villa. Great 
grandparents are Don and Darlean Crane of Round Lake Beach, and 
Lenora Schlctty. 

Joshua Brian Malkamaki 

A son, Joshua Brian, was born Oct. 9 at Condell Medical Center to 
Brian and Kristen Malkamaki of Antioch. Grandparents are Michael and 
Francis Krafthefer of Grayslake, Kenneth and Patricia Malkamaki of Lake 
Villa. Great grandparents are Jerry and Alice Nelson of Round Lake Beach, 
Virginia Hayhurst and Laurie Malkamaki. 

Kyle James Heywood 

A son, Kyle James, was born Oct. 15 at Lake Forest Hospitai to Lori 
and Vincent Heywood of Antioch, He has a brother, Vincent, 2 . 
Grandparents are Roberta and James Matusek of Grayslake. 

Auttim Marie Foley 

A daughter, Autum Marie, was born Oct. 12 at Condell Medical Center 
to Shannon Blakeman and Jason Foley of Antioch. She has a brother, 
Joshua Blakeman, 16 mos., and a sister, Miranda Blakeman, 5. 
Grandparents are Pat and Terry Thompson of Round Lake Beach, 
Marietta Foley of Fox Lake and Lawrence Foley of McHenry. Great grand- 
mother is Ruby Johnson of Chicago. 

David Michael Miller 

A son, David Michael, was born Oct. 10 at Condell Medical Center to 
Dawn Miller of Antioch. Grandparents are James and Mary Miller of 
Antioch. Great grandparents arc Clifford and Mildred Snell of Paddock 
Lake, Royal and Irene Miller of Round Lake, 



BEST FOOT FORWARD 

FROM THE OFFICE OF 



Antioch Foot Health Center 

Gary J. Guziec, D.PM. Ltd. 
Gary M. Kazmer, D.PM. 



RAYNAUD'S DISEASE 

In Raynaud's disease, named for the French physician who first dis- 
covered it, blood vessels become progressively narrower, interfering 
with circulation, and eventually leading to serious tissue changes. 

In the beginning, there is slight swelling, a tingly feeling, and the 
feet may perspire more than usual. The skin may begin to change 
color. As the disease progresses, the skin at the tips of the toes may 
begin to break down. 

When you first notice such symptoms, it's important to schedule a 
podiarric examination a soon as possible. Non-surgical treatment is 
often effective. However, in serious cases, surgery may be required to 
restore circulation and relieve pain. 

Presented in the interest of better foot care by 

ANTIOCH FOOT HEALTH CENTER 

41380 N. Highway 83 • Antioch 
(847) 395-0627 

24 Hour Answering Service 




FRIENDS 
FOREVER 



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Someone who has been with you as long as you can 
remember. .Someone who has always stood by. you. 
Someone who was there for you during the bad times 
as well as the good times. That's the kind of friend we 
want to be to you. We'll'be there when you need us, 
and we'll settle claims as quickly and conveniently as 
possible. We've provided insurance coverages to our 
customers for 75 years, and we'd like to be there for 
you during the next 75 years. 



Depend on your hometown professionals '^ iBQTSbtYOYlg. 



TIMOTHY H. OSMOND, CIC 

Osmond Insurance Sales, Ltd. 
976 Hillside, Antioch, Illinois 60002 

395-2500 



i 



vPEKINy 



Joan Vistain: One special lady 



There are people in this 
world that some folks like, and 
there are people in this world 
that hardly anybody can get 
along with, but then there are a 
few good people out there that 
everybody cannot help but speak 
fondly of. St. Peter Parish has 
just that person in Joan Vistain. 



JINGLE FROM PRINGLE 



LYNN 
PRINGLE 




J95'b1(>4 



With people being so mobile 
these days and relocating with 
each job promotion, it is unusual 
that a family stays in one place 
longer than it takes to pay off a 
car loan let along a mortgage; 
Vistain is an exception to this 
rule. Within the last several 
months this community has 
been rocked with some very 
major changes and losses. No 
change or adjustment will be felt 
quite more extensively than the 
retirement of the school's right 
hand administrator. 

Anyone who has ever 
walked into the school has been 
touched by her ambience. 
Vistain has outlasted numerous 
pastors, several principals, and a 
variety of teachers. She has 
watched countless students grow 
up and pass through the ranks 
before her very eyes. W[th each 
passing year she welcomes in the 
new kindergartners and'eongrat- 
ulates the graduating class 
before sending them on their 
journey with a little piece of her 
wisdom instilled in them. The 
question is: does anyone remem- 
ber a time when she did not 
occupy some place in the St. 
Peter school building? Her sin- 
cere smile which extends up 
from the corners of her mouth to 
the crinkles of her eyes will be 
greatiy missed, especially for that 




Joan Vistain is retiring from St. Peter Parish after many years of 
service. — Photo by Linda Chapman 

small child who just needs a little 
special attention. Her quiet man- 
ner and calm demeanor have 
held things together on more 
than one occasion. 



She use to be called Joanne, 
now they call her Joan, most 
refer to her out of respect as Mrs. 
Vistain. She has witnessed an 
ongoing array of changes at St. 
Peter's and in the Antioch 
Community throughout her 
years residing and working here, . 
some good, some not so good. 
But always she forged ahead, 
strong and stoic, flowing with the 
changes, keeping up with the 
pace, always with her wit and 
valued sense of humor. She has 
performed secretarial duties, she 
has bandaged more than her 
share of scraped knees and 
elbows, and she has sold more 
school supplies to children than 
Wal-mart, About the only posi- 
tion she has not filled is that of 
bus driver and only because her 
feet could not reach the gas 
pedal and brake. 

She is one of those rare folks 
who never talks ill of anyone and 
always sees the good in people 
no matter how faint the glimmer 
might be. Given some of her days 



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she has encountered, she has 
been St, Peter's own Mother 
Teresa. And now the time has 
come where she has decided 
enough is enough, it is time to 
step down from a position she 
has held for over 30 years, throw 
out that alarm clock and spend 
leisurely mornings writing poet- 
ry. (Sunday's being exception, 
6:30 a.m. mass will still beckon 
her.) There is absolutely no way 
of knowing what and how much 
this wonderful lady has done for 
our school, our church, our com- 
munity. 

Knowing how Vistain prefers 
a quiet life over pomp and cir- 
cumstance, a parade down Main 
Street may seem a bit extreme, 
but definitely a most fitting trib- 
ute to such a gem of a person. 
Now we might see her up at 
McDonald's on Bingo mornings, 
or playing cards at the senior cen- 
ter. There is always line dancing 
or adult karate as offered by our 
Parks and Recreation Dept. to 
keep her active if she finds an 
extra few free hours on her hands. 
So to our : Joanne, Joan, Mrs. 
Vistain or whatever other title 
deems appropriate, we all wish 
you a relaxing, most fulfilling 
retirement. We will all miss you, 
those of us who have known you 
all of our lives as well as those 
who have only recently made 
known your acquaintance. So 
whether it be to travel the world 
or putter in your garden — enjoy 
your retirement, and remember 
your position will be filled, but 
your presence will never be 
replaced. And so goes another 
"Jingle from Pringle"— >' 



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NovcMbER 1, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers 



-ParIc HAppENiNqs- — —— — .; - '■; ■ ■'. ' . '; 

Learn how to make photo albums safe and creative 




Computertots 

Computer fun for little ones. 
These enrichment classes expose 
children in a relaxed and friendly 
atmosphere and provide children 
with a creative, discovery oriented 
experience. Classes are taught by 
experienced early childhood pro- 
fessionals using Apple or IBM com- 
patible computers. The use of com- 
puters can begin an adventure with 
technology to learn of the endless 
possibilities to come. First session is 
Oct. 31 through Nov. 21 and the cost 
is $35 for Village Residents, $40 for 
Township Residents, or $45 for 
those outside of Antioch. 

Me, Myself and Mom 

The Antioch Parks and 
Recreation Department announces 
limited openings in the Mom and 
Tot program designed to introduce 



two and three year olds to orga- 
nized activities. This program gives 
children a chance to share with oth- 
ers in a semi-structured environ- 
ment. Spaces remain on Fridays 
from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

Kids basketball 

Antioch Parks and Recreation is 
holding registration for all basket- 
ball programs. The Parks office has 
expanded its basketball offerings 
this year include ages four through 
adult. Four to eight year olds 
include boys and girls. If you have a 
future all-star in your house, or a lit- 
tle one who just likes to play ball, 
call for details. 

For the 13 to 16 year olds, an 
instructional pick up class is 
offered. High quality instruction 
includes the physical and mental 
parts of the game both as an indi- 



vidual and team player. This offers 
teens a chance to sharpen their 
offensive and defensive skills as 
they learn to play from both sides of 
the court. 

For the adults, an open gym is 
offered at the Antioch High School 
on Sunday evenings from 7-9 p.m. 
for $1 per person per evening. To 
register call the park office. 

Photographs 

Where are your priceless pho- 
tographs? Are they stuffed in shoe 
boxes or drawers? Or worse, are they 
stored in one of the many popular 
albums that chemically destroy your 
photos? If you are frustrated with the 
condition of your pictures, this work- 
shop has some answers for you. 
Learn how to make your albums safe, 
meaningful, and creative. Included 
are: Tips on how to organize your 




wft«;te.V«.'^n:r 



Out for a spin 

Casey Benis, 8, goes for a ride with mom, Sandy Benis of Antioch at the Fall Heritage Motorcycle 
Run held at Lakewood Forest Preserve.— Photo by Dennis Torbeck 




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photos, what kinds of photo-safe 
materials to use, how to start your 
album, and documenting to make 
your photos more meaningful. 

Great for grade school students, 
high school students, moms and 
dads, grandmas and grandpas. 

This information and fun 
hands-on assistance workshop will 
be offered through Antioch's 



Department of Parks and 
Recreation on Wednesday, Nov. 6 
from 7 to 9 p.m. Workshop is $10 for 
village residents, $15 for Township, 
and $20 for those living outside of 
Antioch, For more information call 
the park office. 

For information on these or any 
other Antioch Parks and Recreation 
DepL programs, call 395-2160. 





November 1996 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1 




Holidays in the Mansion 

Noon to 8 p.m., at Lehmann Mansion, 
Lake Villa 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 

Holidays in the Mansion 

10 a.m. to 6 p.m., at Lehmann Mansion, Lake Villa 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3 

Holidays in the Mansion 

Noon to 4 p.m., at Lehmann Mansion, Lake Villa 

Open Gym 

7-9 p.m., Antioch Community High School,-$1 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4 





Free blood pressure screening 

8 a.m. -noon, Victory Lakes, Lindenhurst 

Men's Basketball 

7 p.m., Antioch Evangelical Free Church* 

Antioch Village Board meets 

7:30 p.m., at village hall 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 

ELECTION DAY...Remember to Votel 

Parents Day Out 

9:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m., at Antioch United 
Methodist Church for infants to 5-year- 
olds. Call 395-1259 

Lake Villa Women's Club Bingo 

7 p.m., at civic center 

Lake Villa Twp. Lions Dinner Meeting 
7 p.m. Call 356-9212 for location 



Lindenhurst Park District Board meets 

7:30 p.m. 

Antioch VFW Bingo 

Doors open 4:30 p.m., dobbers only. Call 395-5393 

WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 6 

Northern Lake County Quilter's Guild meets 
7 p.m., State Bank of the Lakes, Lindenhurst 

Lake Villa Committee meets 
7:30 p.m. 

Lindenhurst Plan Commission meets 

7:30 p.m. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7 

Running in Stitches sewing guild meets 

7 p.m., at State Bank of the Lakes, Lindenhurst 

Lake Villa Plan Commission meets 

7:30 p.m. 

COMING SOON 

Nov. 8, 9, 15 & 16: Footlights at St. Peter's 




GOT SOMETHING GOING ON? CALL US! 
Ask for Elise Retzinger 223-81 61 



1 



■ • ' .:■-.-. 




UkEl 



UkElANd Newspapers NovEMbcn 1 , 1 996 




The masked man 

T.J. Ruth, 12, of Antioch prepares to frighten guests of the 
MummyVTomb at Halloween Howl in downtown Antioch. 
The festivities also included pumpkin decorating and carving 
contests and a Tunnel of Terror.— Photo by Sandy Bressner 



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Affiliated w/Condell bosp. 

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(Behind Condell Acute Care Center) 

546-3069 



ml 



Rotary hears of decline from deforestation 

* . TL„iAfiir.-,nftnrliili dnnatoH Cic; nnn i,,u;^u , 



ALEQUNGE ■ 

Staff Reporter 

What happens to people a hemisphere away 
has an impact on us as well according to a Rotary 
member who volunteers in South America. 

James Allans of Wilmette has traveled the Third 
World for 27 years and says the environment is 
decaying in some of these 
areas. What he is seeing is 
complete change in weather 
caused by deforestation. 

"We see the destruction of 
the environment in the 
Southern Hemisphere is hav- 
ing effects all over the world," 
Allans said. 

Allans stressed the defor- 
estation has caused the 
ground in many areas of 
Guyana to harden and in other areas caused severe 

flooding. 

"The Amazon River is up 47 feel. It has 
destroyed 62 villages and forced 8,000 people to 
move," he said. 

Doing what they can are Rotary volunteers who 
finance supplies of medicines and maintain clinics 
in these remote areas of the world. 

Allans said Rotary funds matched with in kind 
services from businesses do much to help these 
beleaguered people. 



'We see the destruction of 

the environment in the 

Southern Hemisphere is 

having effects all over the 

world.' 

James Allans 



The Wilmette Club donated $15,000 which was 
matched by $90,000 worth of services such as addi- 
tional medicines and equipment -enough to run a 
clinic for a year. 

One of the major problems is insects and 
rodents. Most of the disease is spread by them. As 
trees are burned down, bird species which feed 

upon the insects are killed 
which compounds the prob- 
lem, according to Allans. 

Allans, an anthropolo- 
gist, has been volunteering for 
27 years. He has been an 
expeditionary field team 
medic a member of the 
remote team medical corps, 
the Peace Corps and director 
of Mid-USA expeditionary 
teams-Amazon Regions. 
He said the traditional Indian tribes are being 
forced out by ranchers, mining and disease. 

"It they are here eight years, it will be a miracle 
of god," Allans said. 

The Rotary program actually pays the way of the 
volunteers to their country and gives them $50 a 
day spending money. All that is required is a three- 
week stay. 

You don't need a medical background. The 
team members ensure the supplies get to where 
they are supposed to go. 



Rotary governor urges linking groups 



ALEC IUNGE r 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch Rotarians heard from 
the district leader on ways they 
can spark additional community 
involvement and effect change in 
their neck of the woods. 

Karen Kline, area governor, 
told members they are much like 
their forefathers, people who get 
together for the common good. 
They also are the ones to get the 



ball rolling towards bettering the 
community. 

- "All it takes is one or two peo- 
ple and then everyone begins 
working together for an idea to 
grow," Kline said. 

Kline disputed a study by a 
Harvard psychologist noting 
there is a decline in organized 
groups and activities. She 
stressed another study by 
Northwestern professor John 



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CHURCHILL 







Robert W. Churchill is a uniquely effective State Representative. 

He works hard to stay in touch with his constituents and to best 

represent their interests in Springfield. As Majority Leader of the 

Illinois House of Representatives, and chairman of the 

Rules Committee, Bob has played a major role in passing 

legislation on tax reform, welfare reform, Chicago School reform, 

Ethics and government downsizing. 

Most importantly, Bob gets results! 
Let's make sure we keep him on the job. 

■ — Vote. Republican 



Paid for by Citizens for Robert W. Churchill.Tim Osmond, Treasurer 
976 Hillside Avenue, Antioch, Illinois 60002 



■ . > . 



McNight revealed there were 
many organizations existing in 
one of the most blighted areas in 
Chicagoland. 

She said .studies revealed 
there were 249 groups in this 8- 
block area, everything from 
spotts teams to sewing clubs. 

"They were doing above and 
beyond what they needed to do. 
They said they would be willing 
to do more if someone else asked 
them," Kline said. 

Kline suggested the Rotary be 
the vehicle to coordinate with 
other organizations to provide 
even more'back to the communi- 
ty • , " 

As an example she pointed to 

the Rotary's commitment world- 
wide to eradicating polio by the 
year 2000. There are now about 
45,000 cases of polio each year 
compared with 100,000 10 years 

ago. 

She added the Rotary made 
the initial push and that encour- 
aged other organizations to join 

the effort. 

She said Democracy is not a 
political doctrine, but flows from 
the people. 

"Democracy is people doing 
what they can to make their com- 
munities safer and more prosper- 
ous," Kline said. 

She said the energy and effort 
tends to snowball. 

"The power of the-' group 
allows you to do things indi- 
vidually you can't do," Kline 
said. 



rWRiTE Us-i 

Lakeland Newspapers 
wants to hear news of 
local sporting events, 
clubs, organizations, etc. 
Black and white photos 
are also welcome. Please 
send news items to 
Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. 
Whitney, Grayslake, 
60030 or call 223-81 61. 



VV1 « I 1 



W . i W . ..-|W ! ^ f — . y^N —^.. .. .,-. h .* f y T 






NovcMbERl, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 1 v 



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open enrollment, you'll maximize your benefit with 
Victory Memorial Hospital as your preferred provider. 
You'll receive quality care for lower out-of-pocket cost 
when you choose Victory. 

i 

If you choose the Humana HMO, simply select a 
primary care doctor in your network. Victory and 
over 140 area physicians have teamed up to provide 
you a healthcare package built on trust, compassion 
and respect. To join this partnership, all you need 
to do is choose a primary care doctor that is part "of 
Health Options. You can find a list of Health 
Options doctors on the right or listed under 
Victory in your benefits book. 

If you choose the Humana PPO, you will have 
lower out-of-pocket costs when you use any of 
the 140 Health- Options doctors. By choosing a 
Health Options doctor, you'll benefit from Victory's 
award- winning services and a network of over 
100 specialists right in Lake County. 

A primary care physician who meets your needs and 
specialists close to home are important options to 
consider when selecting a healthcare plan. Choose well. 
Choose Victory and Health Options. . 

For a complete list of Health Options PPO and HMO 
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Guy Abderholden, M.D. - Antioch 
Naveed Bari, M.D. - Waukegan ■ 
Nicholas Bellios, M.D. - Gurnee 
Gopal Bhalala, M.D. - Zion 

* Albino Bismonte, M.D. - Gurnee 

* Renuka Desai, M.D. - Lindenhurst 
x John Dunlop, M.D. - Zion 

C. David Engstrom, M.D. - Zion 

Gerald Frank, M.D. - Libertyville Waukegan 

Bruce Frazm, M.D. - Waukegan 

Johr^Freeland, M.D. - Waukegan 

Oscar Giron, M.D. - Grayslake 

Wilfredo Granada, M.D. - Zion 

David Herman, M.D. - Antioch 

Charles Holmberg, M.D. - Waukegan 

Yoginder Kumar, M.D. - Gurnee 

Kang-Yann Lin," M.D, - Waukegan 

Noberto Martinez, M.D. - Waukegan 

Dennis McCreary, M.D. - Zion 

James Monahan, M.D. -Gurnee 

Pedro Palu-Ay, M.D. - Zion 

Rashmikant Patel, M.D. - Lindenhurst, Waukegan 

Robert Schwartzenberg, M.D. - Gurnee 

Chin- Yung See, M.D. - Waukegan 

Dilip Shah, M.D. - Gurnee 

Mohammed Siddique, M.D. - Gurnee 

* MarleneTari'quilut, M.D. - Gurnee 
Alan Thain, M.D. - Antioch 
Dennis Thain, M.D. - Antioch 
Robert Thain, M.D. - Antioch 
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Willard Walton, M.D. - Zion 

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UkElANd Newspapers NovcnibEA 1, 1996 



1 




Look whats hiding in her barn! 

Sixty five pounds of flour* 2 gallons of glue, one hundred plus feed Bags, hundreds of moth balls, 
sixty cans of spray paint and thousands of old Market Journals. Put all this together with count- 
less hours of hard work and what do you get? A dragon measuring 31 feet in length and 15 feet 
in height. Three ladies, Joyce Cross, Joyce Sylvestri and Carole Eaton spent long nights and 
many weekends creating this creature for their annual Halloween haunted house. Carole Eaton 
stands next to the beast as it towers over her. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



* 



You are invited to a 

Ooliela&y ©peat House 

featuring 
The Pampered Chef 




At St. Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church 

977MainSt.,Antioch 

Sunday, November 3 

11:00-1:00 

Good Food, Good Recipes, Good Ideas 

Orders Will Arrive Before Thanksgiving! 
(847) 356-0954 for more information 



WCome Worahip With UsTW^ 

$T[ Y ^ Directory Of Antioch Area, Churches y \yf^ 



Qrocoland Bapttat Church. 258 Ida SL, Anitoch, IL 
Sunday School 11 a.m., morning Worship 11 a.m.; 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robort Williams, Pastor 

First Church of Chrttt, Scientist & Reading Rm. Rio 
173 and Hanton, Antioch, Phono (847) 395-1196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Sonrico 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, 
Bp.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church. 554 Parkway. Phone 
(847) 395-3393. Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday 
Worship 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. 

St Ignatius Episcopal 977 Main St., Phono 

(647) 395-0652. Low Mass 7:30 a.m„ High Mass 9:30 

a.m. Sunday Shcool & Nurrory 9:30 a.m. 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church. 42429 N. Tillany Rd. 
Phono (847) 395-4117. Sunday School 9;45 a.m., 
Sunday Worship 8:30, 11:00, 6:00, Children's Church 11 
a.m. Nursery both services. Awana Club. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rio. 59. 
Phone (847) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, B, 9:15 & 
10:30. Church School 9 am. , Sunday. The Rev. Chariot 
E. Miller, Poslor. 

Christian Ufa Fellowship Assemblies of God Church. 
41825 Deep Lake Rd., AntJoch. Phono (B47) 395-8572. 
Sunday School ( all egos) 9 am., Sunday morning 
Worship 10 a.m., Children's Church 10 a.m., Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m., Wednesday Worship & 
Children's Program 7 am., Tuos. Women's Fellowship & 
Bible Study 9-11:30 am. Jeff Brussaty, Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main SI. Phone 
(647) 395-1600. Sunday worship 8 & 10:30 am., Sunday 
School 925 a.m., toon. 7 p.m. Rev. Oamld Qruen, Rev. 
Gregory Hermanson, Pastors. Christian Day Shcool 
(647)395-1664. 



Mllrburn Congregational United Church of Christ 
Grass Lake Fid. at Rio. 45 Phono (847) 356-5237. 
Sunday service 10 a.m. Chlldron's program 10 am, Rev. 
Paul R. Ma lira r, Pastor. 



United Methodist Church of Antioch. 848 Main SL 
Phono (847) 395-1259. Worship 8:30 & 10 a.m.; 
Fellowship Time 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Tho 
Rev. Kurt A Gomlin, Pastor. 

St Peter's Church. 557 W. Lake SL. Antioch. Phone 
(B47) 395-0274. Masses wookdaye, 7:15 & 8 a.m.. 
Sunday 0:30, 8, 9:30. 11 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m. Pastor Rov. Father Lawrence Hanley. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, Phono (847) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's 
Church 10:45. Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rev. Don Sweeting. 



Good Shepherd Luthem Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rtw. 59 & 132), Lako Villa 
(847) 356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:16 & 10:45 am.: 
Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 a.m. 
Rov. John Zollmer, Pastor, Christian Preschool. 



Dan Dugenake, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



Osmond 




From page 1 

Community High School. He earned a bachelors degree in business 
from Western Illinois University. He has owned and operated Osmond 
Insurance Service, Ltd. since 1997 which was founded by his father, 
Bernard Osmond. 
' He became a certified paramedic with the Antioch- Rescue Squad in 
1978. He held the rank of lieutenant for several years and now is the 
squad chief. 

He is member of Antioch Lions, Antioch Rotary Club and Antioch 
Chamber of Commerce. He, his wife, Jo Ann, and their children 
Colleen and Michael, are parishioners of St. Peter Catholic Church. 

Osmond added he would like to continue the work of retiring 
Supervisor Jim Fields and expand upon it. 

"Jim has always helped those in need. That is one of the functions 
of the office, to help those down on their luck," he said. 

Osmond said he would like the township government take a high- 
er profile and have an open forum at meetings. 

He feels he could manage the job of supervisor and that of business 
owner. He added his daughter would take over a majority of the day- 
to-day business - for the insurance business. 

Candidates have until January to obtain the necessary signatures of 

registered voters. 



Parking 



From page 1 

getting a ticket. . 

LeMere said the rule was added to encourage those who want to 
use the two-hour space if they are going into a shop or for a bite to eat. 
However, those who want to stay longer are encouraged to use the six 
hour spaces. 

For those who violate the overtime parking will be fined $5 com- 
pared with the current $1. 

Howl draws big crowd 



ALEC IUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

Antioch officials were thrilled 
with the response to the third 
Halloween Howl. 

This year, an estimated 8,000- 
10,000 attended the two-day 
event, according to Claude 
LeMere, community develop- 
ment director. . < 

This was, by far, the biggest one 
we've ever had," LeMere said. 

LeMere added such organiza- 
tions as Antioch Chamber of 
Commerce, Jaycees and Antioch 
Coalition of Auto Dealers helped 
volunteer for the event. 

"It was gratifying to see the 
whole community pull together 
for a such a big party," LeMere 
said. 



The free event boasted two 

children's areas, free hayrides, 

merchants distributing candy, 

children's games, a "Tunnel of 

Terror" and Dracula's Cave." 

• "Everyone was . courteous, 

they were having a good time. 

There was not even a hint of a 
problem," LeMere noted. 

Included In the helpers were 

Antioch area grade school to high 

school students. 

"It was wonderful to see the 
enthusiasm of the kids who 
helped out for this," LeMere said. 

The event was designed, to 
provide a safe, family oriented 
Halloween activities. 

The village board participated 
by sponsoring a children's area as 
well. 



Fox Chain O'Lakes winter 
drawdown to begin Nov. 1 



The William G. Stratton 
Lock and Dam at McHenry will 
begin winter drawdown of the 
Fox Chain O'Lakes water levels 
on Nov. 1, according to lock- 
master Frank Novak. 

"We allow about a month to 
take the Chain water level down 
18 inches to provide protection 
from ice damage to shoreline 
structures such as docks and 
seawalls," Novak explained. 

The drawdown also accom- 
modates the change in the 
watershed during the winter 
months of the year. 

"Since most of our 
watershed is agricultural, the 
'thirsty' corn and beans slow 
down the run off rate during 
the summer, but in the winter, 
when the ground is frozen, the 
run off can be much faster, 
which can lead to a quick flood 
situation," Novak added. "The 
drawdown helps minimize this 
effect." 



Novak also noted that the 
locks at the Stratton Dam will 
close for the winter to all boat 
traffic at 11:30 p.m., on Sunday, 
Nov. 3, so that routine mainte- 
nance and preparations for 
winter can be accomplished 
before the onset of freezing 
weather. 

"Usually, we close the lock 
on Oct. 31, but that date hit late 
enough in the week that we put 
it off until Sunday to give every- 
one one last weekend," he said. 

The Stratton Lock and Dam 
is operated by the Illinois Dept. 
of Natural Resource's Office of 
Water Resources, utilizing 
funds appropriated from the 
State Boating Act Fund. There 
is no charge for boats using the 
lock. 

Questions or comments 
regarding the winter drawdown 
and/or lock closing can be 
directed to Novak at 9815)385- 
2848. 



Lakeland Classifieds 

Get the Job Done! 
Call (847) 223-8161 



I 






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■ 



> 



* <• 



" 



: : 




NovEMbiR 1 , 1 996 UkelANd Newspapers 



»> 





Onto, 

Three Antioch youth - 
teams will play for trophy 
RAGEA12 

Athletes of 
the week 

Golf team members 

honored 

RAGEA12 




Carmel High sought a 
non-last minute finish to its 
season finale against St. 
Patrick. 

Unlike Northwestern, the 
Corsairs record in doWn-to- 
the wire; finishes is sub-par. 
Buton this balmyFriday 
. nlghti : everything clicked for 
the Corsairs as they finished 
the season with a 20^7 win 
over the St. Patrick club 
headed to the playoffs, 

"We are psyched up for 
each game, so it is hard to 
teU; -The attitude and the 
hard work have not been dif- 
ferent week to week," Carmel 
coach Mike Fitzgibbons said.- 

';] Sophomore Jon Styx 
scored touchdowns on runs. 
pf:3 and 2yards^, the later 
comihg^atthe end of an 
eight-minute third period 
drive- 
John O'Malley had 63 . 
; yards in seven carries. Jim '.; 
Hanna had a 69 yard effort 
^whichset^p the TDs. 

'■The offensive line played 
very well," Fltzgibbbhs said. 

Kevin Dix, a junior QB, •' 
: "did a great job. He threw 
across his the Other way on 
the'touchdown pass to Matt 
Dana," Fitzgibbons said. , 

The' defense stiffened 
when it had to. After a Chris 
Elliott 22-yard run for a 7-7 
tie in the second period, the 
offense of the 7-2 team was 
shut down. 

Carmel had a fourth 
down stop inside the 10 and 
one at midfield, . * 

Hanna gavethe Corsairs 
a key fourth down tun, mak- 
ing two yards when he need- 
ed one. 

"We will sorely miss the. 
seniors' leadership/.They led 
the never surrender charge,'* 
.Fitigibbonssaid, ',,. ; - : - 

. Dan Pptempa had 6 tack- 
les and 2 assists. The senior 
linebackerwas named all 
Catholic Metro conference. 

Center Raffel Losaho, a 
senior; Jason Chilicki and ; 
running back Hanna gained 
the all-league honors as well. 

"Dan was a fine defensive 
player - one of the best we 
have ever had," Fitzgibbons 
said. 



* 



ACHS spikers dig in, claim shot at regional title 



STEVE PETERSON _ 

Staff Reporter 

The numbers were right up on the score- 
board for all to see: visitor 8, home 0. 

It looked like the Graysiake-Antioch match 
would certainly head to a third game. Antioch 
had won the first 15-3, but the second looked 
like it was there for the Rams' taking. 

"We dug in. We never wanted it to go three 
games," Antioch's Carrie Gofron said. 

With some assistance from some classmates 
as well as younger teammates, the match was 
over in two games, as Antioch won 15-13. 

The 14-17 Sequoits have a chance at knock- 
ing off their own regional's top seed when they 
faced Libertyville Thursday. 

The Northwest Suburban Conference teams 
did not fare well elsewhere. Grant lost 15-11, 15- 
6 to Crystal Lake Central for an 8-20 season. 

"The setting was perfect - it is so easy to put 



it down when you have Lisa Ips'en and Carrie 
Kowalczk setting. We have worked hard. It is so 
exciting to work for a kill," Gofron said. 

■ Emily Levin and Megan Kbtlarz were the 
underclassmen who provided spark. 

Gofron appears to be a crowd favorite at 
ACHS volleyball matches. Football players shout 
'Carrie, Carrie'when she serves and sometimes 
when she does not 

"We cheer at their football games and they 
cheer at our games. Itis a lot of fun," Gofron 
said. 

"We were pumped up to play the first game 
- Grayslake is a good passing team but when it 
was 8-0., we held them and were able to hang 
on. Levin played an outstanding match. They all 
played well, steady," Antioch coach Gwen 
Varneysaid. 

Levin was 9-of-10 with 8 kills. Gofron had 8 
kills on 16-of-20 tries. 



Behind senior Kowalczyk's serves and a miss 
rotation by Grayslake, the Rams were behind 8- 
at the outset of game one. 

They rallied for a few sideouts, and Nancy 
DeGraff gained an ace, but could not break the 
Antioch momentum. 

Jen Koll sparked the Rams in the second 
game. Tiffany Michalowski had an ace for a 7-1 
lead and Jessica Kiefer's kill gave the Rams an 8- 
llead. 

That is when Antioch drew the line across 
the court. Grayslake had six sideouts without a 
point as the home team got back into the swing 
of things. 

Two aces by Kowalczyk tied the battle. 
Grayslake went ahead on an ace by DeGraff and 
led 13-10. 

The five-point rally ended with a Ram' miss 
hitting the ball into the net 

The Rams' season ends at 7-16. 



j 



SPORTS 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



ACHS celebrates upset, savors six-victory season 



Antioch High football head 
coach Del Pechauer had a phrase 
ready for the last game.of the reg- 
ular season. 

."If you don't win, you don't 
get in. We finished a couple of 
points out of the playoffs - we had 
32 and you needed 36," Pechauer 
said. 

There was plenty of satisfac- 
tion to be had this Saturday af- 
ternoon in Antioch. The Sequoits 
responded every time when pres- 
sured by the Lake Forest Scouts. 
Brandon Polheber scored his sec- 
ond TD of the game from six 
yards out. 

Quarterback Dave Gooch 
remained as a threat to run the 
ball. He had 10 carries for 61 
yards and had a 51 -yard TD run. 

The Sequoits had their second 
straight winning season with a 6- 

See ACHS page A13 




Antioch's Chris Schultz is enroute to a touchdown near the end of the first quarter for the Sequoits 
as they knocked off playoff bound Lake Forest. The Sequoits defeated the Scouts 28-25 in the sea- 
son finale. — Photo by Steve Young j - 

ACHS' Chudd responds when needed in playoffs 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

When the pressure is on, Kevin 
Chudd is a good soccer player to 
rely on. 

"In our seven wins, he has the 
game tying or game-winning 
goals," Antioch coach Brad Wilson 
said. 

Chudd scored the first goal and 
the last in a 3-2 double overtime 
win over Warren. The win advances 
Antioch to the sec- . 

ond round of the Chudd scored the first 
Wheeling sectional goa | an d the last in a 3 
against libertyville. 2 double overtime win 

Chudd beat Ed over Warren , The win 

advances Antioch to 



Montano to the side 
of the goal minutes 
after Warren had a 
premature cele- 
bration and some 
fisticuffs broke out. 

Matt lohnson appeared to be 
the hero for Warren, but the official 
ruled off-sides on the play. After 
Warren's goal was waved off, one 
player from each team was given 
an ejection red card for violent play 

Enter Kevin Chudd. He sent a 
shot which found the far side of the 
Warren goal, giving the win to ACHS. 

Johnson gave Warren a 2-1 lead 
in the second half of regulation 
with less than 15 minutes left But 
Carl Wheeler dribbled around a 
Warren defender and scored for a 
2-2 tie. It stayed that way for the 
next 40 minutes. 



"We were pumped up and our 
emotions took over," Chudd said of 
the game-winning goal. 

"We had a couple of defensive 
miscues and little mistakes that 
hurt us a lot. There were some 
tough calls. After the fight, it was a 
real letdown for us. We lost focus 
and that is too bad," Warren coach 
Bob Tatgenhorst said. 

"We are at a disadvantage when 
we play a physical team, We have a 
tendency to get ten- 
tative with our pass- 
es," Tatgenhorst said. 
Wilson said his 
team was told after 
the melee it could go 
out and win the 
match or do some- 



the second round of 
the Wheeling sectional thingstupid. 
against Libertyville. "We did a better 

. job - we had to. Last 
time, they won every loose ball," 
Wilson said, referring to a 3-0 
Warren win over Antioch in the 
season finale. 

Wanen concluded at 10-7-2. 
The Sequoits were playing 
short-handed. Cameron Mitchell 
was out because of a red card 
received the match before; Brad 
Mendalke was in an automobile 
accident and Chris Porter is out 
. with a knee injury. 

Pitching in on defense in front 
of goalie Steve Holevas were: Cory 
Sibil and Chris Hodges and Chris 
Placko. 



/ 




W^ii 






Antioch's Mark Miller and Nick Mendelke work the ball down the 
field. Antioch defeated Warren 3-2 in double overtime to 
advance to the second round sectional. — File photo by Steve 
Young 




UkElANd Newspapers NovEMbER 1 r 1996 



■B 

'Hi 




Antioch sends three teams 



on to league cha 




Three of four Antioch youth 
football teams advanced to 
. championships games in their 
respective divisions of play in 
Junior Football league of 
Northern Illinois. The 

Featherweights, Lightweights, 
and Heavyweights will play for 
conference championships 
Sunday at the Warren 
'' Township Center. The Viking 
Pee Wees came up on the short 
end of- a 6-0 score against 
Grayslake. 

The Antioch Raider 
Featherweights will meet the 
Mundelein Broncos in the 
league title game. The Raiders 
advanced to the championship 
game by holding on to a 7-6 win 
over Warren Blue. Both teams 
defensive units dominated 
throughout the game. The 
Raiders only score came in the 
third quarter on a 65 yard punt 
return by Brett Bairstow. 
Bairstow also scored to what 
proved to be the game winning 
extra point. 

Warren came back in the 
third quarter on a long outside 
* run to cut the lead to 7-6, but 
the Raider defense stepped up 
and stopped the extra point 
attempt. * ' 

Raider defensive honors go to 
Scott Gehrke, Dino Katris, Sam' 
Garden, Dave Hartman, A.l. 
Baslcr, and Adam Lehn. 

The Viking Pee Wees battled 
Grayslake evenly throughout 
their playoff game, but three 
fumbles, one of which hap- 



pened at their own 20 yard line 
with just a minute left, was the 
turning point for the Vikings as 
Grayslake scored with just 20 
seconds left in the game. The 
defensive unit played outstand- 
ing for Antioch and included 
linebackers 

Brian Wood, Chris Pollack, Ben 
Rosewicz, lineman Chris 
Cabrera, defensive end Luke 
Seznov, and corner back Jason 
Rogalla. The team will play the 
Indianapolis Jr Colts in the 
Youth Super Bowl next week. 
- The Antioch ' Viking 
Lightweights shutout the 
Round Lake Spartans 34-0 and 
will meet the McHenry Hornets 
for the. league championship 
Sunday at the Warren 
Township Center. Running 
back Mike Smith opened the 
scoring for Antioch in the first 
quarter on a 58 yard run. In the 
second quarter, running back 
Bobby Crasser caught a 15 yard 
pass from QB Mark Purnell for 
the second TD with Purnell 
scoring the extra point. Then 
just three plays later line- 
backer Chris Romano stripped 
the ball from a Spartan ball 
carrier ran 30 yards for a third 
Viking TD. 

The Vikings scored two more 
TD's in the second half, an 8 
yard run by Smith and a 22 yard 
scamper by Grasser. Purnell 
kicked extra points and Billy 
Damron scored an extra point 
as well. The defense was out- 
standing limiting Round Lake 



to five first downs. Linebackers 
Smith and Grasser had nine 
tackles each with six tackles by 
■nose guard Matt Elliott, and five 
each by Romano, Chris 
Richardson, and Jim Huspen. 
The Viking offensive line 
opened large holes for the 
backs to run through. Antioch 
lineman include Ryan Roberts, 
Eric Sesko, Bill Banser, Lincoln 
Barnett, Justin Mehaffey, Josh 
Kaminsky, Damron, and Tom 
Miller. The win was the 
Lightweights 39th straight win 
over a four year period. 

The Antioch Heavyweights 
will battle the Warren Packers 
for the league championship 
Sunday after their hard fought 
20-8 win over a well prepared 
Round Lake Spartan team. 
Antioch scored on the opening 
drive on a TD run by back Alan 
Rapinchuk early in. the first 
quarter. 

The extra point kick by Scott 
Hodina made it 8-0. But Round 
Lake came right back to tie the 
game and the second and third 
quarters was a standoff with 
neither team able to find the 
end zone. In the fourth quarter 
Papinchuk scored thanks in 
part to key blocks thrown by 
end Chris Rogalla. Hodina 
added a third Viking TD late in 
the game. Punter Mike Pocious 
was cited by the coaching staff 
for several excellent punts dur- 
ing the second and third quar- 
ters which kept Antioch out of 
trouble. 



lindenhurst Typhoons defeat Elk Grove 



On Sunday, the Lindenhurst 
Typhoons resumed league play 
at Forest View where they 
defeated the Elk Grove Strikers 
'2-1, Though the Typhoons con- 
trolled the ball much of the 
game by hustling-and individ- 
ual dribbling skills, Elk Grove 
displayed team skills rarely 
seen at this level of play. 

Early in the second quarter, 
precision passing enabled Elk 
Grove to score first on a text- 
book play' The Strikers drove 
the ball into the left corner of 
the field before crossing it over 
in 'front of the goal where 
another Striker had an open 
net for the score. The play left 



Typhoon goalie Erick Voight 
defenseless. 

During the second half, the 
aggressive play of defenders 
Joseph Barlow, Trevor Hall, 
Kyle Kozuck and Matthew 
Wade prevented the Strikers 
from reaching goalie Brett 
Carlson. 

Late in the third quarter, 
Darren Nordstrom dazzled the 
Elk Grove defenders, along 
with Typhoon fans, with a bit 
of fancy foot work that gave 
him an open shot on goal for 
the tying score. 

The score remained tied 
until literally the last minute. 
With 30 seconds left in the 



game Darren Nordstrom 
placed a corner kick in front of 
the Elk Grove net where Alex 
McKenzie had the cannon 
cocked and ready. Like much of 
the game, however, the Elk 
Grove goalie was in a good 
position to deflect his shot. 
Thanks to the heads-up play of 
Darren (a.k.a. Fred Astairc) 
Nordstrom who followed his 
corner shot into the goal 
instead of watching from the 
corner, he too was in the right 
place at the right time. With 
.ten seconds left, Nordstrom 
poked the deflected ball into 
the net to give the Typhoons 
the victory. 



Lindenhurst Rockets post fourth shut out 



The Lindenhurst Rockets 
posted their fourth shutout of the 
season with a 3-0 victory over 
Elmhurst. The Rockets dominat- 
ed the play leaving goalie Jennifer 
Michehl virtually unchallenged 
during the match. The defensive 
team of Becky McBrady, Lori 
Knupp, Kristen Gagne, Katie 
Malcolm and Amy Shouse once 
'" again turned in an outstanding 
performance keeping the ball in 
play on the Elmhurst half of the 
field most of the game. 

Tina Washburn opened the 
scoring for the Rockets in the first 
half when she received a pass up 
J the field from Becky McBrady. 
Washburn shot was misplayed by 
the Elmhurst defense and passed 
by the goalkeeper for the score. 
Lissa Coby was credited with the 
Rocket's second goal after scdr- 
; ing on a penalty kick after a 



handball call was made against 
Elmhurst. Callie Check finished the 
scoring for the Rockets with an 
unassisted goal. Check gained pos- 
session of die ball at midfield and 
took a shot that deflected off an 
Elmhurst player trying to stop the. 
shot and into the goal for the score. 
Other Rockets players con- 
tributing to the victory were 
Courtney Ksioszk, Katie Lincoln, 
Melissa DeMeyer and Barbara 
Leal. The Rocket's record is 6-1-1 
and they will be hosting the 
Mundelein Magic next Sunday. 

Rockers Girls U-12 

The Rockers completed their 
home schedule last weekend 
playing Saturday vs. 

Schaumburg and Sunday vs. 
Arlington Hts. winning both 
games and improving their 
record to ! 4-2-2. On Saturday 



the Rockers defeated 

Schaumburg 2-1. After trailing 
1-0 at half-time Vicky Garrison 
tied the game off a great feed 
from Kristina Gopp. Kelly 
O'Connell scored the winner at 
the 10 minute mark with Vicky 
assisting. The defense held the 
lead as Stephanie Willding 
made a great save from the 
stopper position. 

Sunday the Rockers defeated 
the Arlington Aces 2-0 with Kelly 
and Erin Jouppi sharing the 
shutout. Kristina scored for an 
early 1-0 lead assisted by Erin. In 
the second half Beth Fries scored 
with the assist going to Vicky for 
her third point of the weekend. 
The midfielders stepped up this 
weekend with Annie Heath, Caity 
O'Neill, Theresa Gosciniak and 
Miranda Korbal turning in strong 
performances. 










1 




Athjetes of the week 

Above, Jeff Mulder, president of the First National Bank of 
Chicago, presents the athlete of the week award to Steve 
Drengler along with varsity golf coach Roger Aim. Drengler 
showed great skill when he shot a 77 in the sectional tourna- 
ment in Bloomington. Below, golfer Jeff Crivello was also 
honored as athlete of the week for taking first place in the 
conference championship tournament with a score of 78. 
The First National Bank and Thelen Sand and Gravel will 
make a donation to the Antioch High School Scholarship 
Fund in the name of each athlete for his outstanding effort. 







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Power drops close one 



The Lindenhurst Power went 
on the road and dropped a game to 
the Wheaton Wings by a 3-2 score. 
The game started off looking like 
the Power was going to dominate 
when they scored just a little over a 
minute into the game on their ini- 
tial offensive nish. Jamie Wismer 
tallied when she volleyed in a 
crossing pass from Sarah 
Richardson. Wheaton later scored 
on a penalty kick and then on a 



wind blown goal which changed 
the momentum of the game. 
Wheaton kept the pressure on for 
the rest of the game until 
Lindenhurst was able to convert on 
a penalty kick of their own. Jenny 
Barbera, Nicci Estep, Kristen 
Gamlin and Shayne Jacobsen had 
strong games for the Power in the 
defeat. With the loss, the Power's' 
League record drops to 3-3-1 on 
the season. 



Thunder played Spirit 



The Lindenhurst Thunder 
Girl's U-10 Soccer team played 
the Palatine Spirit to a victory 
this past Sunday. 

The first goal of the game 
came within the opening min- 
utes when Carly Richter 
crossed to Pam Staton for the 
score. A forward pass from 
Stefanie Sweeney setup Holly 
Roberts, who sent a great left 
footed shot into the net for the 
second goal of the game. Two 
other goals scored during the 
first half were unassisted goals 
by Megan Placko and Gina 
Florian. The second half of the 
game opened quickly, with a 
serials of passes, that caught 
the Spirit defense off guard and 
help to setup Holly Roberts for 



her second goal of the game. 
Megan Placko got her second 
goal of the game minutes later, 
on a long, high kick from mid- 
field. The final goal of the game 
came on a defensive error cause 
by a Palatine Spirit player. • 

Other Lindenhurst Thunder 
team members contributing to 
the win' were Janelle Buss, 
Melissa Lulofs, Michelle 
Marturano, and Stefanie 
Sweeney, with outstanding 
goal keeping efforts by Calla 
Myslinski and Amanda Otten. 
The girls on the Lindenhurst 
Thunder team have practiced 
hard, giving an outstanding 
effort in all the games that they 
have played. The Lindenhurst 
Thunders record is 8-0. 



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NovEMbEit 1 1 1 996 UkElANd Newspapers 





area qualifiers 




Rothermel 




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After more than two miles, 
the race between Antioch's Liana 
Rothermel and Crystal Lake 
Central's Katie Treptow boiled 

down to a 
matter of 
strides, 

"I almost 
won - she 
beat me by 
three 
strides. I 
just tried to 
keep my 
head. She 
was right 
behind me 
the last three-fourths of the race. 
I thought I had a good race," 
Rothermel said. 

The race was good enough for 
a second place finish by an eye- 
lash as both runners had 12 min- 
utes, 49 second races in 
Woodstock. 

Antioch finished third as a. 
team with 76 points, qualifying 
for the sectional Nov. 2 at 
Schaumburg. 

Grant was ninth with 247 
points and Wauconda! 1th in 313. 
Grant had topped 

Wauconda's effort in the confer- 



ence meet and did the same at 
regional. 

Colleen Kuemmel clocked a 
15:23 to lead Wauconda. Lordes 
Salinas, a junior, had a 15:43. • 

"Colleen has been running 
hurt - she ran with the pain' and 
ran hard. Lordes and Colleen 
have switched on and off as team 
leaders. Lordes got off to a good 
start with the leaders, but fell 
back," Wauconda coach Al 
Wllhoit said. 

Grant, the Northwest 
Suburban . Conference boys 
champ, carried the day with a 
fifth place 130. Antioch was ninth 
in 207, Wauconda 11th in 321. 

Roy Lundelius paced the 
Grant effort with a 17:36 while 
Chuck Bosworth had a 17:41; Eric 
Johnson a 17:52; Wayne 
Bosworth a 17:41 and Kerry 
Gonzalez a 18:54. 

Ken Bratton qualified from 
Antioch with a 17:42. 

Wauconda juniors Mike 
Geary and Jeremy Shaver had 
time of 20 minutes and 19:21. 
"Both boys had a slow start, but 
surged. It was good experience 
for them for next year," Wllhoit 
said. 



[ 

Rams, Panthers treat fans 
|to fine finish of rivalry 



The ending seemed to match 
the significance of the final foot- 
ball clash between Grayslake and 
TRound Lake as members of the 
Northwest Suburban 

Conference. 

No over early blowout wins 
f here this balmy Friday night. The 
final Friday of October has been 
reserved for the Rams-Panthers 
neighborhood clash for years and 
the two did not disappoint. It 
took an overtime before 
Grayslake overcame the Panthers 
19-16. 

Two Palos spelled victory for 
the Rams as quarterback Jeff 
Palo tossed a 9-yard TD strike to 
Jason Palo for the winning score. 

"The offensive line did a great 
job as we moved the football up 
and down the field and Don Ryes 
and Jeremy Grace made big plays 
on defense," Rams coach Dan 
Dillon said. 

It was Grace's fumble recov- 
ery which led to a Neil Schroeder 
2-yard TD run in the fourth peri- 
od. 

Brian Lester booted a 29-yard 
field goal on the Panthers (3-6, 2- 
3 NWSC) for the first overtime 
score. 

Then it was Palo time in 
Grayslake. 

"Jason deserves all the credit. 
He kept both feet in bounds on a 
difficult catch," Dillon said. 

Mike Ditka to 

Football legend and former Chicago Bfears head coach Mike Ditka will 
speak on "Attitude, Character and Enthusiasm" at the College of Lake 
County on Dec. 5. His presentation will begin at 7 p.m. in the physical edu- 
cation center gymnasium at CLC, 1935 1W. Washington SL, Grayslake. This 
event starts at 6 p.m. 

Ditka's appearance is a fundraising event sponsored by the CLC base- 
ball team in cooperation with Libertyville Lincoln/Mercury, Classic 
Chevrolet in Waukegan and the Nite N' Gale Restaurant in Highwood. 

Tickets are $20 for general seating and $15 for bleacher seats. Tickets are 
on sale now at the CLC box office, room C 101, or call 223-660 1, ext. 2300. 
Advance ticket purchase is highly recommended as the college expects the 
event to be a sell out Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express are 
accepted. For more information, call 223-3600. 



The Rams, who were knocked 
out of playoff contention with 
lopsided defeats the last two 
weeks, gained the school's first 
winning season since 1990 play- 
off team at 5-4. The game meant 
twice in a row these juggernauts 
have played an extra session. 
Round Lake won last year in 
overtime 8-0. 

Jason Olson led the Rams 
finale NWSC game with 208 yards 
in 25 carries. He broke free for a 
75-yard TD run in the first period 
for a 7-0 Grayslake lead. 

James Clifford and Schroeder 
bolsted the Rams offense with 
key runs. 

Justin Krebs scored on a 20- 
yard run and Derek Edwards 
broke free for a 66-yard TD scam- 
per in the second half for Round 
Lake. 

The Rams slowed the 
Panthers' offense otherwise. 

"We got a lot of new people in 
the defensive line with Rich 
Anderson and Dennis Adkins," 
Dillon said. 

A day later, Adkins reflected 
on four years of Dillon football at 
GCHS. ' 

"I like him and the way he 
motivated us," Adkins said. 

Dillon and the Rams will chal- 
lenge the Fox Valley Conference 
as the school joins the FVC next 
year. 



at CLC 









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Antioch's Brandon Pol he ber makes a touchdown run in the fourth quarter to put the Sequoits ahead, 
28-25 over favored Lake Forest.— - Photo by Steve Young 



ACHS 



From page All 

3 mark, although the Class 5A 
playoffs did not beckon. Weak 
non-conference foes Aurora 
West and Chicago Harlan and 
winless NSC foe North Chicago 
cost the Sequoits post-season 
goals. 

"Gooch has developed all 
year long. At first, we gave him 
too much to do. But he learned 
how to make audibles and throw 
the ball. He read the option 
well," Pechauer said of Gooch. 

Chris Schultz, who con- 
tributed a 5 -yard TD run and 
two-point conversion, added 65 
yards. 

"The defense did well. Stu 
Johnson, the inside linebacker, 
makes all the defensive calls on 
the field and does an outstand- 
ing job. We had seven seniors on 
defense and they all played 
well," Pechauer said. 

Lake Forest trailed 14-3 on 
Polheber's 6 yard run and 
Schultz's eight points. But the 
Scouts dominated the second 
quarter, as Jack Rovetto added 
to a field goal with a 25-yard 
TD pass from Phil Irvine. Rick 
Thornhill added a 2-point c6n- 
version run. Thornhill scored 
from 3 yards out and Ron 
Goode snared a 2-point con- 
version run for a 19-14 Lake 
Forest lead. 

Gooch burst through for his 
TD, answered by a Thornhill 4- 




Lance May pushes through for more yardage. — Photo by Steve 
Young 



yard run. Polheber then went to 
work, punching it in from a yard 
out. Schultz helped make that 
possible for a 24-yard run. 

"It was a big game and you 
can't make too many mistakes. 
They never give up," Pechauer 
said. 

The Sequoits can only won- 



der what might have been. 
Plainfield and Salem Central Wis. 
open the schedule next year - 
which features the return of 
Gooch and most of the offensive 
backfield. One can bet the 
Sequoits will be fans of those two 
teams the remaining seven 
weeks. 



Salas's goals sparks Rams booters 



Adjusting is a daily task for Sam 
Salas, 

He is a senior at Grayslake 
Community High School, but the 
Mexico City native must listen to 
classes in English and keep up with 
his classmates as best he can. 

Then he has a chance to enjoy 
his favorite sport in which he excels 
- soccer. The senior scored two 
goals as Grayslake edged 
Johnsburg 3-1 in the first round of 
the Wheeling sectional on 
Saturday. 

"Sam was hurt, but he played a 
great game. His midfield play 
picked up everyone," Rams coach 
Joe Martinez said. 

Both of Salinas's goals came in 
the second half after Johnsburg had ' 
gained a 1-1 tie. 

"In Mexico City, we play with 
more finesse. Here it is more phys- 



ical," Salas said through his inter- 
pretator, also the head coach, 
Martinez. 

The Rams are a close-knit 
group. The highest seeded team 
ever in Grayslake soccer history 
battled for a regional title at home 
Tuesday with Lake Forest, upset 
winners over McHenry. 

"He feels the team unity is 
important. He works extremely 
hard. This team is getting closer 
and closer," Martinez said. 

The Rams (13-5-1) defense had 
to be changed as Blake Larson was 
injured. The goalie was replaced by 
fullback Griffin Ford. 

"It made me want to step up 
and play stronger after Blake was 
hurt," Ford said. 

Martinez said the other Rams 
have accepted Salas well. 

Josh Shipley scored the Rams 



first goal just before haltime. "Josh 
played whale of a game. He is a very 
smart ballhandler who can adjust," 
Martinez said. 

Junior James Jaqus tied it up for 
the Skyhawks. 

"We both played a good game. 
The first Grayslake goal was a beau- 
tiful goal. We tied it up then had a 
shot hit the crossbar and another 
one go wide," JHS coach Dave 
Rigbysaid. 

Johnsburg had a 14-7 season, 
the best in school history, but three 
of the losses came to Grayslake. 
The future looks bright as only four 
seniors graduate with 23 people on 
the squad. Soph Shawn Stewart led 
the team with 16 goals. 

But for Grayslake and a friend 
from Mexico City, the Rams were 
still in the hunt for the school's first 
sectional semifinal spot 










'. t V* V- 




LaIceIancJ Newspapers NovemIier 1, 1996 



Wi\ 




Antioch 




l 



ALEC IUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

Antioch Youth Baseball League 
is looking for some volunteers to 
keep a top notch program provid- 



ing the opportunity for children 5- 
18 to play baseball. 

The league membership has 
expanded to about 700 children a 
year, according to President Mike 



Perrone. 

Perrone added he is not looking 
for anyone with special skills. Just 
people who want to help. 

"We really need some of the 



new residents, people who might 
be willing to help but don't know 
how," Perrone said. 

The Antioch program differs 
from many other communities 




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because it offers both boys and girls 
baseball programs. There are sepa- 
rate leagues. 

Particularly, the league is seek- 
ing someone to be a concessions 
director and a fields director. 
Neither position requires experi- 
ence. 

If you're interested in finding 
out more about volunteering, call 
Perrone at 838-3354. 

Money management 
course for retirees 

"Lifelong financial security" 
(GSP 067) a four week course for 
people who have retired from full- 
time employment, will be. offered 
by the College of Lake County in 
November. Students may attend 
the class "from noon to 2:30 p.m. on 
Fridays Nov. 1, 8,15 and 22 or 2 to 
4:30 p.m. ori Tuesdays Nov. 5, 12, 
19 and 26 at CLC's Grayslake cam- 
pus. 

The cost for the course is $38 
per person, plus $25 materials fee 
payable to the instructor on the 
first night of class. For information, 
call 223-3616. To register by phone 
call 223-1 Hi; 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The Loon Lakes Management 
Association Annual Meeting will be held 
Thursday, Nov. 21, 1996 at the Antioch 
Senior Center, 817 Holbek Drive, Antioch, 
Illinois, 60002 at 7:30 p.m. 

The meeting will consist of the regular 
Business Meeting along with the Bi- 
Anriual Election for the following Officers: 
President, Vice-President, Secretary, ., 
Treasurer and Two At-Large Directors. 

Anyone residing or owning property, 
within the boundaries of Special Service 
Area-8 in and around Loon Lakes are 
encouraged to come and cast their vote,' ec 

1096D-360-AR 
October 25, 1996 
November 1, 1996 T 
November 8, 1996 
November 15, 1996 IS 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

The following parcels of property, 
acquired through the Tax Sale Certificate 
Program, are being offered for sale by the 
County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted to 
the County of Lake, Tax Extension Dept., 
Room 101, 18 N, County St., Waukegan, 
IL 60085. 

Bids received will be retained for 30 
days after the Initial bid. After completion 
of the 30 -day period, the County has the 
right to accept the highest bid or to reject 
it If the amount Is insufficient or if the sale 
would not be in the best Interest of Lake 
County Taxpayers. 

Willard Rooks Helander 
Lake County Clerk 

UNINCORPORA TED ANTIOCH 60002 
25492 W. Clinton Av. 01-24-41 1-001 
22257 W. Loon Dr. 02-21-409-017 

1196A-375-AR 
November 1,1996 



f 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Nu Air Concepts. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO 
BE CONDUCTED OR TRANSACTED IN 
THIS COUNTY: 40625 Sunset, Antioch, IL 
60002. 395-8395. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR ■ 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) 
OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING BUSI- 
NESS: Donald F. Foley, 40625 Sunset, 
Antioch, IL 60002. 395-8395. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the location(s) indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of the 
person(s) owning, conducting or transact- 
ing the business Is/are correct as shown. • 
Donald Foloy 
.October 15, 1996 

The foregoing Instrument was acknowl- 
edged before me by the person(s) Intend- 
ing to conduct the business this 15th day 
of October, 1996. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Richard L Sarmont 

Notary Public 

Received: October 17, 1996 

Wlllard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1096D-355-AR 

October 25, 1996 

November 1,1996 

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NovcMbtR 1, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers COMMUNITY [ - ■ 




■ 











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Clubhouse 

Golf Clubs & Snowboards 

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(SE corner of Rt 21 & 

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Hours: M-F 11-7; Sat 10-6 

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95Chevy1ahbe 30,595 28,595 

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| '96 Nissan Pick-Up' 14,995 12,995 - 

95 Olds; Cutlass Supreme 15,995 .13,9951 
| S3 Chevy 3/4 Ton p/u 4x4 13,995 t 

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THE ULTIMATE FOOTBALL CONTEST 






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WEEK 11 | 
Games of Nov. 9-10 


16 




15 


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13 




12 




11 




10 




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7 


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6 




5 




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HOW TO PLAY 

Select a winner from each of the week's 
games, listed below. Select in descending 
order of your CONFIDENCE in your 
choices. Win points at left for each correct 
selection toward possible total of 1 36 points, 
See complete rules below. You must be at 
least 8 (eight) years old to enter. To enter, 
clip along dotted, line, then place game 
entry in POWER POINTS container at co- 
sponsor's retail outlet(s). Entrants must list 
name, address and phone number below. 



$ 268"/mo. 

x48 




Entries 



are 





"GTIVR6" 



I Marquardt 



LIMIT: You may enter only one coupon 
statewide per week. 

DEADLINE: 2 P.M THURSDAY 



Motors 



TIEBREAKER 1 








TIEBREAKER 2 





Total points scored 
(both teams) in 
BEARS game. 

'Total offensive yards 
(both teams) in this game. 



136 TOTAL POINTS 



THIS WEEK'S GAMES 



Name. 



Address , 




City. Slate (zip). 
Day Phone ( 
Night Phone ( 



Arizona nt Washington 
Baltimore at Jacksonville 
Chicago at Denver 
Green Bay at Kansas City 
Indianapolis at Miami 
New England at N.Y. Jets 
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati 
N.Y. Giants at Carolina 



Atlanta at St. Louis 
Buffalo at Philadelphia 
Dallas at San Francisco 
Houston at New Orleans 
Minnesota at Seattle 
Oakland at Tampa Bay 
Ohio State at Illinois 
Northwestern at Iowa 



i 

| RL41& 
| Washington St, 
Gurnee 

1(^)249-1300 

I 
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j The 

I Clubhouse 

(Rt 21 & 
I Washington) 
I Saratoga Square, 
I Gumee 

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1(847)360-8595 



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&Sr«v» r#s£«iC WS*'' 




279 9 7mo, 



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"Jetta GL" 



POWER POINTS OFFICIAL RULES 



1. Object ol the game is to amass as many of iho 
136 possiWo points as you can Simply review the ; 
week s schedule ol games, listed on enliy form, and 
decide which game you are sure si ol picking a winner 
In. Wnle the name ol your project od winner on lh c 1 6 ■ 
point line, II that learn wins its game that week, you win 
16 points. Wnle Ihe name ol youi second-surest 
winner on the 1 5-point line, and so on down lo the 1 - 
po<nt line, which game you figure to be a loss-up. 
Ne»t, fill in Tiebreaker 1, the lolal points scored by 
both teams in Ihe week's Bears, Rams or Illinois 
game. II this step fails lo produce a winner, the judges 
will apply Tiebreaker 2. total offensive yardage from 
scrimmage in tins, game, il a winner still doesnl 
emerge, a drawing will be held among those contes- 
tant slill lied. Decisions of the judges are final The 
weekly winner of Ihe contest will receive Ji ,000. 

2. Any entry form that does not contain a legible 



name, address, etc.. will be disqualified. 

3. ■ Entries that lai! to lorecasl a winner from each 
and every* game will be disqualified, as will entries 
that fail lo distinguish between Ihe Jets and Giants of 
New York and Pill and Pittsburgh. 

4. Mo points are awarded on tie games or in case 
any game is not played for any reason during its 
scheduled week 

5. Entering POWER POINTS consli1ul.es permis- 
sion by contestant for his or her name and pholo- 
graph lo be used (or news and reasonable promo- 
tional purposes al no charge. 

6. Employees of this newspaper and Iheir immedi- 
ate (amii'es are ineligible lo participate. 

7. Any inquiry about or protest ol weekly results 
must be made by Noon on the Friday following Ihe 
announcement of winners. 

& No puichase necessary. Facsimile game entry 



forms wiH be accepted. Enterconlest by dropping entry 
lorm into POWER POINTS conlainer al participating 
co-sponsors. 

9. Weekly deadline lor entry win be 2 p.m. Thurs- 
days except when noled otherwise on weekly entry 
lorm. 

10. Neither (his newspaper nor any co-sponsor win be 
respon sibl e for Illegible entry lorms or those Josl, stolen 
or damaged in any way. 

11. Umit: one entry per person per week . Each entry 
musl represent Ihe original work of one entrant; "group" 
entries, "systems' or other ariempls to enter multiple 
entries will be disqualified. Filling oui extra forms and 
putting your friends' and relatives" names on ihem 
violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior 
lo grading. 

12. Contestants must have reached the age ol eight 
(8) years by Ihe Sunday ol.any week's play. 




k >219 9 7mo. 



•$1,000 cash down plus tax, titlej license. 1st payment, sec, dep, $450 acquisition fee 10c per mile extra. 12,000 miles per year Included. 




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GURNEE, IL 




' 




(847) 249-1300 

Moh.-Thur. 9-S; Fri. 9-6; Sat 9-5 









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7§7;NQvWb«.^t(K«te 'UkelANd Newspapers LAKELIFE 



Critic's Choice — 'Male ; 
Intellect' offers comic relief 
tb please both genders 
H Page B7 

■'.■.' r£ ■■■•■:. 

■ *uM2t*to*L -to - hi--*, v ""■ 







In Fall home and garden- 
Squeezing the most out of 
summer's finest vine 
Page B 7 




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Lakeland 

Newpapers 






■ 







"When we let life lead us instead of us 
trying to lead life, things flow " said 
Susan Roos Bockwinkel. 



usan Roos Bockwinkel's life has lead her on a 
winding path which has included many surprises 
and has put her at the forefront of the holistic 
healing field. 

Roos Bockwinkel of Lake Villa started her 
career as an ER nurse, she then moved into the 
field of holistic healing, and is now the author of a 
novel, "Rhiannon: Truth Seeker." She is also a 
mother and wife and, most recentiy, an ordained 
non-denominational minister. 

"I think everyone of us has a spiritual alarm 
clock- When it goes off, things start to happen very 
quickly," said Roos Bockwinkel 

Roos Bockwinkel's career in healing began 
after receiving her master's degree as a nurse practitioner 
from the University of Virginia. 

The Lincolnwood native worked in the emergency ward. 
of Cook County Hospital. With tight funding, a nurse practi- 
tioner w as able t o.perform some of the procedures normal- 
ly dorie~by doctors?-™ :r- 

"When diagnosing a patient, you were often able to rule 



out what (their ailment) wasn't, but you could not say what 
it was. I started to think there was something missing from 
our medical model," she said. 

In order to better care for her patients, Roos Bockwinkel 
took a class in bodywork, a type of therapeutic massage. 
This started heron the path of alternative healing. 

Her next step on the path was sparked when she 
became acquainted with a doctor who was practicing 
acupuncture. She enrolled in an acupuncture school in 
Chicago and Went oh to do her internship in Shanghai, 
China. 



With a background that was tending more and more 
towards holistic methods, Roos Bockwinkel left the hospital 
and started Body Therapeutics" in Highland Park, one of the 
Midwest's first holistic healing centers. 

"When I was working as a nurse, I was very professional 
about it, I went through paramedic training ... I wanted to 
be a really good ER nurse. It wasn't until I left that I realized 
I missed a whole aspect of care for people, the care of the 
soul," said Roos Bockwinkel. 

"There may be nothing more you can do for a person's 
illness.but there's always more you can do for the person," 




Sijara 



Nurse's life leads her into holistic field and novel writing 



In 19B5, while practicing acupuncture, Roos Boqkwinkel 
ran into an obstacle. She was arrested for practicing with- 
out a license. The case Was eventually dropped because the 
state of Illinois didn't have any licensing mechanism for 
acupuncture. Roos Bockwinkel noted, some 10 years later, 
the state is finally getting ready to actually legalize 
acupuncture. 




she said. 

While studying acupuncture, Roos Bockwinkel realized 
the field was not an end destination, just a slop along the 
path. However, she credits the study with opening her eyes 
to the concept of energy, what theTaoists call Chi. 

"I always thought of us as physical beings with energy 
flowing through us. It took many years to realize that ener- 
gy creates matter. We are energy," she said. 
Roos Bockwinkel finds the evolution of the scien- 
tific perspective interesting. "In quantum physics, 
they're saying there is no such thing as matter; 

CLAUDIA M. LENART 

Regional Editor 



there's only energy," she said. She noted in recent 
surveys of scientists, most are saying they believe 
in a higher power. 

Roos Bockwinkel's fascination with energy led her 
See SPIRIT page B5 




Susan Roos Bockwinkel relaxes with her 
children, Chani, 8; Yuri, 6; and Kara, 4. 
Roos Bockwinkel has just published her first 
book,"Rhiannon: Truth Seeker," a story 
about the spiritual journey of a young girl. 
The book is available at Leaves of Earth in 
Antioch and Borders Bookstore in 
Deerfield, or write to P.O. Box 341, 
Northbrook, 60062.— Photo by Sandra 
Bressner 



mmmmammaa 




LAKEUFE LaI<eIaincI Newspapers NovtMbtR 1, 1996 



-Kids Fare— — - ,"'• ; ' : ■ ■ , " ■ " . . . : • ."- 

CLC presents children's musical theatre Nov. 10 




"The Lion, the Witch and the 
Wardrobe," to be performed at 
1 and 3 p.m. Nov. 10 at CLC 
auditorium. 



C.S. Lewis' children's story, "The 
Lion, the Witch and the 
Wardrobe," will be brought to life 
in a musical theatre production at 
the College of Lake County on 
Nov, 10. Performances will be held 
at 1 to 3 p.m. in the auditorium, 
19351 W. Washington St., 
Grayslake. 

The story of four school chil- 
dren who travel to the land of 
Namia through the magic of a 
wardrobe is translated to stage by 
five members of "Theatreworks 
USA," a group based in New York. 
Tickets are $3 per person. For rick- 
ets, call 223-6601, ext. 2300. 

Toy F aire 

Kohl Children's Museum 
invites children and their parents 
to enjoy the fun and educational 
world of toys at the Fall Toy Faire, 
Friday, Nov. 8 through Sunday, 



Nov. 10. Come to see how much 
fun educational toys really can be 
as youngsters experience games 
nd toys hands-on. 

For the first time, books and 
computer software will be repre- 
sented at the Toy Faire. Also new 
this year is children's Christmas 
cards, advent calendars, and cre- 
ations by Anne Geddes. From 
stomp rockets to talking globes, 
the Toy Faire has something for 
every child. 

Th Kohl Children's. Museum is 
located at 165 Green Bay Rd., 
Wilmette. Hours are Tuesday 
through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m., Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.; 
closed Monday. Admission is $4 
per person, seniors are $3 and chil- 
dren under 1 are free. For more 
information, call 256-6056. 
Puppet theatre 

Charm aine and Company will 



stage "Aesop Says,* a program for 
kids in grades kindergarten 
through fifth and their parents, on 
Saturday, Nov. 2, form 10:30 to 
11:15 am, at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake 
' Forest. Tickets are priced at $5 per 
seat. 

These wonderful, large pup- 
pets will have everyone in the 
audience involved as a magic 
bookmark brings old Aesop, the 
storyteller, out of the past Priginal 
music helps him tell his stories: 
"The Tortoise and the Hare," "The 
Boy Who Cried Wolf," "The Ant 
and the Grasshopper," and "The 
Fox and the Grapes." Aesop real- 
izes the importance of books and 
reading. The children will also 
learn a few interesting facts about 
ancient Greece. 

For further information, call 
234-6060. 



Saturday science 

Students in grades fourth 
through eight will be awash on sci- 
ence on Saturdays at Stevenson 
High School, One Stevenson Dr., 
Lincolnshire. "Science for Young 
Students," beginning Nov. 2 and 
ending Dec. 7, will teach kids 
about biology, chemistry, earth 
and environmental science, and 
physics. This series of classes is 
intended to inspire and motivate 
young people in the sciences, and 
prepare them for the high school 
science curriculum and beyond. 

Each session will meet from 1 
to 3:30 p.m. in room 8006 at 
Stevenson High School. The cost is 
$1 15. The class is pare of the SHS 
Patriot Recreation Education 
Program's fall community educa- 
tion curriculum. For more infor- 
mation, call 634-4000, ext 300.— 
byROSELLELOVE 



Parents beware — sometimes tricks aren't a treat 



It's Halloween time and there's 
lots of scary fun out there! Be care- 
ful that your kids are ready for it 
before you do iti 
Dear Dr. Singer, 

A few days ago, my hus- 
band took our two children to 
one of those haunted houses. 
My kids are 1 2 and 8, Since 
going, my 8 year old wont 
sleep and is really much more 
afraid of the dark than before. 
What can I do to help her? L.D. 
DearLD., 

Those haunted houses can get 
really scary these days. The effects 
they use are getting more and 
more realistic! I'm still scared to go 
into many of them! SomeUmes.it 
makes kids feel a lot better to be 
able to understand how it's all 
done. 

What I mean, is if you can sit 
down and talk with her about the 
hours of make-up that goes into 
the performance. The fact that 
these are all just people that are 
dressed up and having a good time 
scaring people. When you're 8, 
sometimes the line between fanta- 
sy and reality can become blurred. 
I can clearly remember seeing the 
movie, "The Fly" when I was 8. 1 
told my mom I could handle it and 
then proceeded to cover myself up 



so tightly that night because I was 
truly afraid that I would wake up in 
a spider web! 

I truly couldn't in the dark of 
night find that reality distinction, 
and your daughter may be having 
the same problem. Try and focus 
in on what is scaring her 
the most. When you find 
out, diffuse it. Like I said 
a minute ago, make it 
into the production 
preparation versus the 
show. If she can know 
that the effects are made 
of rubber and that these 
people are going to go 
home afterwards and 
maybe get a snack and then go to 
bed just like she does, it might 
help. 

The other thing I would recom 
mend is that until she is older, try 
to have her not go to those haunt- 
ed houses next Halloween. They 
can get very frightening because 
usually there are people jumping 
out at you in the dark! Tell her for 
me, that there's nothing to be 
afraid of and I wouldn't steer her 
wrong! Good luck! 
Dear Dr. Singer, 

I absolutely hate 
Halloween! I hate the horror 
and fear and the graphic sim- 



ulations of death. My kids 
seem to love all of It 
Obviously Jhis creates a prob- 
lem. What do you think of the 
whole Halloween tradition? 
Signed, .sick of the scares! 




PARENT'S 

Place 



Slierri Singer, Psy.D. 
Licensed Clinical Psychologist 



Dear Sick of the scares, 
Halloween can be looked 
at from two angles. One is light , 
and one dark. The light angle is 
that it's a time for make believe, 
fantasy and lots and lots of candy! 
This is how most kids see it 

The other way to look at it is 
that it's a dark holiday that cele- 
brates horror and fear. Many peo- 
ple find that description of it to be 
even more intriguing than the first 
I'm not sure of why you bate 
Halloween, but I can suggest that if 
your kids are young enough and 
you want your kids to look at it in 
the light way, it's up to you to 



make it that way for them. 

Rather than resisting it and 
making them do it on their own, 
leaving their viewpoint to them- 
selves, you could take the opportu- 
nity to introduce the light, fun side 
of it. Don't focus on the horror and 
fear. Focus on the dress- 
ing up and the candy and 
the fun. Also, understand 
that when kids get to a 
certain age, they seem to 
love being scared. 

Ghost stories are a pop- 
ular thing done routinely 
at slumber parties having 
nothing to do with 
Halloween. Older kids 
tend to become attracted to horror 
movies. There's really nothing 
abnormal about that Of course, if 



it becomes an obsession, it isn't a 
normal thing and should be looked 
into, but the average, run-of-the- 
mill older child, will like this stuff. 

There are many theories about 
why, Try not to make it an opposi- 
tional thing. Talk about it if it con- 
cerns you. Clarify what is accept- 
able to you and what isn't and 
then remember that they may or 
may not accept your definitions. 
Halloween can be really fun if it's 
looked at the right way! Be with 
your kids and help them to see it 
the right way! 

Editor's note: Dr. Sherri Singer is 
a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, 
childhood behavior specialist and 
author of the book, "Why Time Out 
Doesn't Work," CalUierat(630) 
415-0974. 




Miif people write ti EU. 
S»ekil|is»swerfi|. 

GREG K I N N E A R 

DEAR GOD 



S6« 



nniwnxnu. ™ ™ 



Fri 5:05 7:30 10:00 Sat 12:10 2:35 5:05 7:30 10:00 tny | ii|fc THFATRF 
Sun/Wed 12:10 2:35 5:05 7:30 Mon/TuefThu 5:05 7:30 rwA ,~J"™ , nana 
No passes or coupons t° 4 /; 97 3-iauu 




•VICE PRESIDENT 
GEORGE BUSH 
WON THE PRESI- 
DENTIAL ELECTION. 

•U.S. UNEMPLOY- 
MENT FELL TO ITS 
LOWEST POINT 
SINCE 1974. 

•THE LOS ANGELES 
DODGERS WON THE 
WORLD SERIES 
DEFEATING THE OAK- 
LAND ATHLETICS. 

•FLOODS IN CHINA 
KILLED THOU- 
SANDS AND LEFT 
THOUSANDS MORE 
HOMELESS. 




Football Scrarnbfe 

Unscramble the fetters befoco and 
discover oyords that have to da mth football 

1. A football field is 100 of these long. SARYD 

2. The best team in football is decided at this yearly event. LUOPERSWB 

3. This happens when the offensive team crosses the opposing teams's goal. 
NOHUOCDTW 

4. Detroit is the football home to what king of beasts? S I O N L 

5. A 60-minute football game is divided into four SUARRT'EQ 



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NovEMbER 1, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers LAKELIFE B? 









F.Y.I. 




Jeremy Chapman, Jeff Weber/ Cameron Corbin and Kelly Anne Burke 
star in "Peter Pan." 





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'Peter Pan' 

The curtain will rise on 
Highland Park Players' 9th 
annual musical production, 
"Peter Pan," which will be 
presented on Friday and 
Saturday, Nov. 6, 9,. 16, 16 at 8 
p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 10 
and 17 at 2 p.m. There will 
also be a performance on 
Nov. 16 at 2 p.m.- The pro- 
_duction will take place in the 
Vlisner Auditorium at Central School, 
521 Grove St. in Glencoe. Tickets are 
available at Karger and West Ridge 
Center in Highland Park and are $10 
In advance and $12 at the door. 
Tickets can be ordered by calling 205- 
91B8. 

'Dracula' 

Bram Stoker's "Dracula" will be 
performed by the Univ. of Wisconsin- 
Parkside Dramatic Arts Dept Nov. 1 
and 2. "Dracula," the first production 
of the 1996-97 plays at Parks ide 
Series, will be performed at 7:30 p.m. 
In the Communication Arts Theatre, 
located at the south end of the main 
campus complex. Admission is $8 for 
the general public, $6 for senior citi- 
zens. For ticket information call, 
(414)595-2564. ... .; 

Auditions 

Auditions for "Steel Magnolias" are 
set for Nov. 18 and 19 at 7 p.m. at the 
Northbrook Theatre, 3323 Walters Ave., 
Northbrook. Rehearsals begin Niv. 21 
and are Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday 
evenings from 7 to 10 p.m. Auditions 
will consist of cold reading from the 
script Cast includes six women ages 18 
to 65. Performances begin Jan. 24 and 
runs through Feb. 15, 1997 on week- 
ends.There is no pay. For further 
Information, call 291-2367. ' 

Really You?' 

Don't miss Laughing Stock 
Theatre's last show of the season, "Is 
The Real You Really You?" The show 
runs Nov. 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 22 
and 23 at Andres Steakhouse In 
Richmond. 

No Exist' 

Jean-Paul Sartre's "No Exit," the 
fall theatre production of the College 
of Lake County, will open at 8 p.m. 
Friday, Nov. 8, in the auditorium, 
19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake. 
The play will be repeated at the same 
time on Nov. 9, 14, 15 and 16. "No 
Exit H is a gripping drama with a focus 
on character development. The ( 
drama unfolds when a group of peo- 
ple find themselves in a room togeth- 
er and confront each other about the 
choices they have made in their lives. 
The play is directed by CLC English 



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instructor Eibhlin Glennon. Tickets 
are $7 general admission and $5 for 
CLC students and alumni. For tickets, 
call 223-6601, ext. 2300. 

'The Mouse Trap' 

The Cuneo Museum and 
Gardens, 1350 N. Milwaukee Ave. In 
Vernon Hills and Northstage Theatre 
will present Agatha Christie's "The 
Mousetrap" in the Great Hall of the 
museum, Thursday through Sunday 
evenings, now through Nov. 17. 
•Curtain time is 8 p.m; Admission Is 
$15 and $12. A dinner package is 
offered. Call 362-3042 for reserva- 
tions and information. 

Tales of Terror' 

The Stage Two Theatre Company Is 
celebrating the Halloween season with 
their annual salute to the eerie! "The 
Telltale Heart and Other Tales of 
Terror" is a collection of four gothic 
tales from the horror genre's most cele- 
brated writers, Including Byron, Edgar 
Allan Poe, Bram Stoker, and Sir Arthur 
Conan Doyle, and Stage Two Is putting 
all four together for an evening's excur- 
sion into the land of fright, running 
now through Nov. 2. Performance 
times are 730 p.m. , Thursdays; 8 p.m., 
Friday and Saturdays, and 3 p.m. on 
Sundays. Stage Two Theatre Is located 
at 410 Sheridan Rd., Hlghwood. Tickets 
are $15 general public, $12 students, 
seniors and $10 for groups of eight or 
more. For deket reservations, call 432- 
7469. 

'Singta* in the Rain' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire Theatre 
presents "Singln' in the Rain.' 
Performances begin Oct, 30 and con- 
tinues through Jan. 19, 1997. 
Performance schedule is Wednesdays 



at 2 and 8 p.m.; Thursdays at 8 p.m.; 
Fridays at 8 p.m.; Saturdays at 5:30 
and 9 p.m.; and Sundays at 2:30 and 7 
p.m. Tickets to all performances are 
$33, senior and student discounts 
available. For further Ucket informa- 
tion, call 634-0200. 

'Rapunzel' 

The Northbrook Theatre for 
Young Audiences, 3323 Walters Ave., 
Northbrook, is now showing 
"Rapunzel." The play will run until 
Nov. 2. Performances are at 10:30 
a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays only. For 
ticket Information, call 291-2367. 

'Beau Jest' 

The Northbrook Theatre presents 
a modern comedy about a young 
Jewish girl whose fiancee, unbe- 
knownst to her parents, just doesn't 
happen to be Jewish. "Beau Jest" will 
be performed Nov. 1 and 2 at 8 p.m. 
All seats are reserved and priced at 
$16, $14 for senior citizens. The 
Northbrook Theatre is located at 3323 
Waiters Ave. in Northbrook. Call 291- 
2367 for ticket reservations. 



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Guitar night 

Seven nationally and inter- 
nationally acclaimed finger- 
style guitarists from across the 
country will converge on the 
stage at the Woodstock Opera 
House to per form In concert 
for "Woodstock Guitar Night" 
The concert will be on Friday, 
Nov.l at B p.m. For tickets are 
call (815)338-5300. 

Jazz brunch 

A spectacular afternoon of fun, food 
and jazz is what's in store when the 
Riverside Foundation Auxiliary hosts its 
fall benefits, a Jazz Brunch. A cham- 
pagne brunch, silent and live auction 
will all be part of this musical event 
Jazz entertainment will be provided by 
the Bradley Young Orchestra ra. 

The event Is set for Sunday, Nov. 3 
at Marriott's Lincolnshire Resort, 10 
Marriott Dr., Lincolnshire. Tickets are 
$100 per person. For Ucket informa- 
Uon, call 634-3973. 

Rick Neely concert 

Just Folks Music Company ■ 
announces the next concert In its 
monthly Fall Folk Music Concert scries 
at Stamps A'Brewin', 323 N. Seymour, 
Mundelein. Rick Neeley will appear on 
Saturday, Nov. 2 from 8 to 10:30 p.m. 
Neeley's musical skills on the 12-string 
guitar and banjo couples with a bloom- 
ing voice will please all audiences. 
Doors open at 7 p.m. Admission is $5 at 
the door. For further information, call 
566-2686. 



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Fall is here — time to turn your ovens back 
on!!! 

A new feature is coming to Lakeland 
Newspapers and we need your favorite, 
quickest hottest, most delicious meal or 
snack! 

Send your recipes to: Roselle Love 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



CLC presents harpist 

. Internationally acclaimed harpist 
and singer Harvi Griffin will perform in 
concert at 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 at 
the College of Lake County auditorium, 
19351 W. Washington St., Grayslake. 
Tickets are $13 for the general public 




and $10 for CLC students and alumni. 
Griffin's style of music is a unique 
blend of pop, jazz, country, gospel and 
classical music For tickets, call 22 3 - 
6601, exL 2300. 

Lakes Area Band 

Lakes Area Community Band, 
directed by Matthew Kastor will per- 
form at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 
AnUoch Community High School, Rte. 
173 and 83 in Antioch. Admission is $4 
for adults, $2 for students and senior 
citizens. Musical selections will follow 
an autumn theme. The band includes 
50 plus musicians who live In northern 
Lake County. 

CLC Wind Ensemble 

The College of Lake County Wind 
Ensemble, directed by CLC music 
. instructor Bruce Mack, will present its 
first concert of the new season at 4 p.m. 
Nov. 3 in the Grayslake campus audito- 
rium, 19351 W. Washington SL A vari- 
ety of classical and popular r selections 
will be featured. For information, call 
223-6601, exL 2566. 
See FYI page B4 



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Nov. 8th, 9th, 10th 

Friday 3-9pm % Saturday 10:5pm * Sunday 11 -4pm 

THE ORIGINAL. HAKCER ^HOW 
Eaaturing -tit a Gi^xtHm and ">A£*i 



On*. Hundr«d^Mality CrafUr* 

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Quilts Hi Dolls Hi Bears Hi Santas Hi Lamps Hi Miniatures Hi Toys 

Clothing Hi Floorcloths Hi Original Fine Art Hi Fish Carvings 

Pottery * Stained Qlass Hi Weaving Hi Furniture Hi Wood Working 

Baskets Hi Signs * Wooden Primitives Hi Seasonal Decor 

ADMISSION: ADULTS $4.00 

CHILDREN UNDER 12 FREE 

For More Information: 



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4^ (630) 268-8067 o>- 



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A few beers, maybe a nightcap or two. I thought I could 

handle it. But when my job performance went down, my 

relationships were affected and I couldn't stop, 

I had to admit I needed help. 

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A Not For Profit Organization 



Victory's Outpatient Chemical Dependency Programs are also 

available at 2031 E. Grand Ave., Suite 200, Lindenhurst, Illinois 

Call (847) 356-9685. 




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LAKELIFE UkeUNd Newspapers NovcmbER 1, 1996 



FYI 



From page B3 



LLI 

< 



Gasper dance 

Buoys and Belles Square 
Dance Club is sponsoring a 
Casper dance on Friday, Nov. 1 
at First United Methodist 
Church, 128 N. Utica St., 
Waukegan. Plus workshop will 
be held from 8 to 8:30 p.m.j 
main stream and round danc- 
ing from 8:30 to 10:30 p.m.; 
and plus tip at 10:30 p.m. Cost 
is $3.50. For further informa- 
tion, call 662-6546. 



Square dance 

An old time square dance will be 
held at the David Adler Cultural Center, 
1700 N .Milwaukee Ave., Ubertyville on 
Saturday, Nov. 2. The will be a family 
dance beginning at 7 p.m. will Paul 
Tyler. The square dance will begin at 8 
p.m. with callers Valerie and Michael 
with Dot Kent. For further information, 
call 367-0707. 



Holiday arts 

More than 70 crafters will 
sell their wares at the College 
of Lake County's arts and 
crafts show on Saturday, Nov. 
2. The show will be held from 
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the physical 
education center, building?, 
at the Grayslake campus, 
19351 W. Washington St. The 
sale is sponsored by the CLC 
women's volleyball and soft- 
ball teams. For information, 
call 223-3600. 



Traditional crafts 

Country Collections is sponsoring a 
traditional craft and folk art faire with 
more than 100 crafters on Nov. 8, 9 and 
10 at Harper College, Algonquin and 
Roselle Roads, Palatine. Show times are 
Friday from 3 to 9 p.m.; Saturday from 
10 a.m. to 5 p,m. and Sunday from 1 1 
a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $4 for 
adults, children under 12 are free. 

For further information, call 268- 
8067. 





Ring in the holidays 

Anticipate holiday needs by visiting 
the Suburban Fine Arts Center Holiday 
Sale. The Gallery will feature dozens of 
artists with their crafts including, 
ceramics, jewelry, glass, books, fabrics, 
statues, and toys. The show will be held 
on Thursday, Nov. 14, Friday, Nov. 15, ■ 
and Saturday, Nov. 16. Show hours are 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Gallery is located 
at 1913 Sheridan Rd. in Highland Park. 
For further Information, call 432-1888. 

Combined Singles 

All singles are invited to a 
joint "Super Dance" sponsored 
by the Combined Club Singles 
and Chicago Metro Singles at 8 
p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2, at the 
Bam of Barrington Restaurant, 
1415S.BarringtonRd., 
Barrington. Music will be pro- 
vided by Music in Motion. 
Admission will be S6. For more 
information, call 209-2066. 

Christian Singles 

The Christian Singles group (ages 
50 and up) is composed of those who 
are widowed, divorced, or never mar- 
ried. The group is non-denominational 
and welcomes visitors and new mem- 
bers. The group will meet on Saturday, 
Nov. 2 at 5:30 p.m. at Calvary Temple, 
450 Keller Ave., Waukegan. A game 
night is planned. Bring a wrapped 
"white elephant" gift for a prize. Before 
the games there will be a pizza supper 
served. Cost is S3. For further informa- 
tion, call 244-1632 or 244-4304. 

Solo Singles 

Solo is a group of friendly, single 
people who meet at Princess Banquets, 
1290 S. Milwaukee Ave., Ubertyville on 
Wednesday evenings for dancing and 
socializing. Join them on Nov. 6 from 8 
p.m. to midnight. Cost is S6 which 
includes appetizer buffet. Also, join 
Solo on Friday, Nov. 15 for a Super 
Dance at the Holiday Inn, Rtes. 45 and 
83 in Mundelein from 8:30 p.m. to 1 
a.m. Admission will be $8. For further 
information, call 945-3866. 




Ace Singles 

The Ace Singles invite all singles to a 
dance at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 6, 
at the Bam of Barrington Restaurant, 
1415 S. Barrington Rd., Barrington. 
Music will be provided by Music 
Makers. Admission is S5 which 
includes a dinner buffet. For more 
Information, call (312)509-5000. 

Visual feasting 

The sculptor, the photogra- 
pher, the painter and the chef 
come together in one exhibit at 
the Suburban Fine Arts Center. 
"Visual Feasting," opening 
.^ Friday, Nov. 8 at 6:30 p.m., the 
exhibit will feature the works of 
10 of the best chefs in 
Cliicagoland as well as two- 
and three-dimensional art 
from Chicago-are artists. 
Curated by Evanston resident and 
artist Jill Friedberg, "Visual Feasting" 
will include the edible artistic creations 
of Margaret Lastick (LeRoyale Icing: 
wedding cakes); Michael Altenberg 
(Campagnola); Peggy Ryan 
(VaPensiero); John Bubala (Marche 
Restaurant); Keith Luce (Spruce); 
Shawn McClain (Trio); DougAnderson 
(Four Seasons); and Richard Aronosn 
(Richie's). 

The evening will end with an auc- 
tion of the edible artwork and restau- 
rant gift certificates to benefit the 
Suburban Fine Arts Scholarship Fund. 
For more information, call 432-1888. 

Fun fine arts 

Fun classes exploring the develop- 
ment of creativity through the Fine Arts 
will be offered by the Performing Arts 
Group, Inc., in conjunction with area 
park districts. Limited spaces are still 
available for the second fall session 
b egin ning the week of No v. 4 . Classes . . 
are offered for all ages from infant and 
toddler/ parent, through elementary 
school ages. 

Call for more information on age 
groups, times and dates, and fees, 526- 
3610 or the Grayslake Park Dlst. at 223- 
7529. 




18& a part of 
£akeland *Neimpaper&' 

Lakeland's Newspapers' annual Holidays and Traditions booklets 
are going to press soon! 

Share your Holiday Spirit with Lake County and keep the excite- 
ment going all year long! 

Send us your favorite holiday recipes, crafts, family tradition sto- 
ries, or your most special holiday photographs and become a part of 
these exciting booklets! 

Deadline for all entries is November 15 ! 

Send items to Roselle Love, 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers, 

30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030 



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Take a step inside magical ring 




The all-new 126th Edition of 
Rfrigling Bros, and Bamum and , 
Bailey, opening Nov. 6 through 17 
at the Rosemont horizon, then 
moving to Chicago's United 
Center, Nov. 19 through Dec. 1, is 
not only high-tech, 
with rapid-fire 
special effects, 
pulsating 
pyrotech- 
nics, and a 
woman that 
literally flies, 
but also — for 
the first time 
ever— high- 
tech. Early-comers to every perfor- 
mance will have a chance to step 
inside the magical three rings, 
swing on a trapeze, walk a low 
wire, try on costumes and learn 
other triclcs-of-the-circus-trade 
first hand from the same artists 
who dazzle audiences in their live 
performance. 

This unique, interactive experi- 
ence is open at no additional 
charge to any ticket holder, parent, 
child or grandparent, who arrives 
at the arena one hour prior to the 
start of a performance. 
Among the international cast of 
stars at work in this year's circus 
are: Britain's preeminent animal 
trainer, Graham Thomas 
Chipperfield, presenting regal lions 
and a herd of ponderous ele- 
phants; the Flying Vargas and 
Flying Tabares, masters of the 
trapeze; high-wire aficionados, the 
Quiros of Spain; Kenya's strong- 
man Samson Power, who lifts 
tremendous loads with his' teeth; 
awesome acrobats from The 
People's Republic of China; and 
the only human being in the uni- 
verse to conquer fear, fate and the 
mighty restraints of gravity— ' 




Airiana, the Human Arrow. 

Tickets for the The Greatest 
Show on Earth are available at the 
Rosemont Horizon Box Office, 
6920 N. Mannheim Rd., the United 
Center Box Office, 1901 W. 
Madison St., Chicago, and all 
TicketMaster locations. 

Prices range from $9.50 to 
$16.50. To order by phone call 
(312)559-1212. For general show 
information, call the Rosemont 
Horizon at 635-6601 or the United 
Center at (312)455-4500. Group 
rates available by calling oia- 
9070,— toy ROSEIXE LOVE 



SpEci/vl Events 

Assist Animal Foundation plans gala 

The Assist Animal Foundation is holding a gala dinner dance on Saturday, 
Nov. 2, at the Crystal Lake Country Club. The gala event offers gourmet din- 
ing and dancing until midnight Festivities start at 630 p.m. with cocktails, 
reception and viewing of silent auctionltems. Some auction offerings are col- 
lectibles from Kenya, E, Africa including a dance, mask, a Maasai spear, 
Turkana milk gourd, and a water dipper of the Pokot people. These along 
with other collectibles, dining options, entertainments/art and holiday Items 
will be available to benefit the operation of the AAF's life care shelter In which 
companion animals are not destroyed, but given quality care until they are 
adopted. Tickets are $50. For further information, call Claire Dehzler at 
(312)951-3222 brtheAAF at (815)455-9411, 

Getyour kicks on Rte. 176 

. You don't have to travel from Chicago to LA to catch the spirit of • 
America's Infamous highway, Rte. 66. Instead,' head down Illinois State Rte. 
176 to the Lake County Forest Preserves' Lake County Museum for the Grand 
Opening of Its new exhibit, "Model A to Z28: America's Love Affair with the 
' Road." On Sunday, Nov. 10, from 1 to 4 p.m., all ages' are invited to view this 
exciting new exhibit, located In the museum's newest wing. Admission Is 
free, and refreshments will be available throughout the event In celebration 
of the 100th anniversary of car manufacturing in America, the '.exhibit will fea- 
ture a different vintage and new automobile each month so viewers can wit- 
ness the progress made in the industry. For further information, call 367- 
6640, exL 122. . 

New coffee house welcomes performers 

Coffeeworks Is the name.of the new coffee house at the Qmrch of the 
Holy Family, 25291 W. Lehrrianri Blvd., Lake Villa. Performances are sched- 
uled Nov. 2 and Nov. 16. Coffeeworks coordinator BarbaraTdmoyahnis said 
the coffee house will welcome singers, musicians, poets, readers, actors, sto- 
rytellers and political commentators in a traditional coffee house atmos- 
phere. For information, call 587-7204. 



Skip's Automotive parts swap meet set 

Skip's Automotive and Truck Parts Swap Meet (16th edition) will be held 
Nov. 3 at the Lake County Fairgrounds, Rtes. 45 and 120, Grayslake. Hours 
arefrom8am.to4p.rn.Generdadmissiorils$5.Forihfonrmtion,.call ■ 
(630)602-8792 or 1(800)250-7369. 

Sports card, memorabilia show 

Grand Slam USA; 2449 Pierce Dr., Spring Grove (Rte. 12 and Spring Grove 
Rd. behind die Clark gas station) will be sponsoring a sports card and memo- 
rabilia show on Saturday, Nov. 2 from 10 am. to 3 p.m. For furiliei; informa- 
tion, call (815)675-3005. ■ ."..-.. 

Healing service to be conducted 

Barbara O'Malley, Internationally recognized Christian healer, will con- 
duct a healing service Wednesday, Nov. 13 at 7:30 p.m. at Villa Olivia Country 
Club, comer of Lake Street (Rte. 20) and Naperville Road In Bartlett Since 
O'Malley received the gift of healing 15 years ago, countless testimonies of 
physical, emotional, and spiritual healings have taken place through her min- 
istry. All are welcome. There is no "admission charge. For further information, 
contact (630)620-1825. ... 






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LAKELIFE UkelANd NewspApERS NovemBer 1, 1996 



It's time to 



. I'm sorry. I know it isn't nice to 
refer to the candidates to our high- 
est office as stooges. But you have 
to admit - it's not that far from the 
truth, at least when it comes to 
campaign behav- 




look if she were dressed as Dennis 
Rodman and suddenly was called 
to testify about Whitewater? A 
President's spouse has to think of 
all these things before dressing in 



ior. They may 
not be doing the 
physical stuff 
(although I do 
remember seeing 
Bob Dole doing 
some crowd div- 
ing), but there is 
certainly plenty of 
eye poking, hair 
pulling and 
"Woo, woo, woo!" going on, if only 
in the verbal sense. . 

Maybe my choice of column 
tides is just a reflection of one of 
the things that's wrong with 
America in the '90s. We don't have 
a lot of respect for politicians. Or 
their wives, either, considering the 
pr^ss has spent four years beating- 
up on Mrs. Clinton. 

Of course, maybe we'd have 
more respect for the candidates 
wives if, for instance, Elizabeth 
Dole didn't make an appearance 
on the David Lertermari show 
dressed as a biker chick. Would 
someone explain that to me? Was 
that because some poll said that 
Dole doesn't have enough of the 
"biker chick votes"? 

I was kind of hoping that, in 
response to Mrs. Dole's stunt, 
maybe Hillary would show up on 
the RuPaul show dressed as 
Dennis Rodman, since a lot of vot- 
ers out there are Bulls fans and/or 
drag queens, but apparendy when 
you're already the first lady, you 
sometimes have to choose dignity 
over votes. I mean, how would it 



LIFE'S 

A 
BEAR 

DONNA ABEAR 




drag. 

So, you can see how goofy this 
campaign stuff is - it doesn't make 
it easy to decide who to vote for. 
For instance, Dole keeps calling 
Clinton a "liberal", while simulta- 
neously claiming Clinton is trying 
to steal his thunder by acting like a 
Republican. Or Clinton keeps talk- 
ing about how Dole is planning to 
cut Medicare and welfare, yet just 
before the Democratic 
Convention, President Clinton 
signs a Welfare Reform bill that 
cuts off benefits after a certain time 
period. How are we supposed to 
make up our minds, when they 
can'tmake up theirs? 

And both of them claim that 
they want to make this a clean 
fight by sticking to the issues. They 
do this by making a half-hearted 
statement about how much they 
like and respect each other, just 
before launching a personal attack 
on the other's values or lack of 
them. 

As you can see, it's very difficult 
to figure out who's telling the truth 
- i.e., nobody really is - so, I try to 



or Curly/Larry 

choose my candidates by other, 
equally worthless criteria: 

WHO'S BETTER LOOKING— 
Clinton/Gore, hands down. In 
fact, they are thebest looking duo 
to ever run for 
the White House. 
I realize that Jack 
Kennedy was 
awfully cute, too, 
but remember 
who his running 
mate was? 
Lyndon Johnson. 
Bowwow. 
WHO'S MORE 
RESPECTABLE— 
Dole/Kemp, of course. Except for 
the "biker chick" episode, it's diffi- 
cult to dig up any good dirt on 
these folks, Although, one can 
never tell for sure. For instance, 
what exacdy does Mr. Dole do with 
that pencil when he and Elizabeth 
are at home? I'm sure if he's elect- 
ed, someone will come up with a 
story. 

WHO GREW UP POORER— " 
This is a tie, at least where Dole 
and Clinton are concerned. ■ 
Clinton grew up poor in Arkansas 
and Dole grew up poor in Kansas. 
What this has to do with their qual- 
ifications is anyone's guess, yet 
they bring it up all the time so it 
must mean something. Poor us 
trying to figure out what 

I could go on and oh, but I'm 
• sure you'll be able to think of a few 
of your own, such as: Who has less 
embarrassing relatives? Who looks 
better in shorts? Who has more 
money than God? (Hint: His first 
name is Ross.) 

Good luck at the polls — and 
look out for t\te grouse. Yuk, yuk. 
yuk, yuk. 




USM 




by RoseIIe toye 
Friday, Nov. 1 

Appearing at Chicago Blue Note, 1550 ;N. Rand Rd„ Palatine 
"will be Magic Slim & the Teardrops Cover is $6; Call 776-9850. 

Elvis Brbs. ; .{Pop Rock), will perform at Slice of Chicago! 36 S. 

NbrthwestHwy., Palatine.Call 991^2150. Duke O'Brieris/1 10 N. 

Main St., Crystal Lake, ; will ..be host to Sister Envy (Rock) at 10 
: p.m, $3 cover. Gail (815)356-9980. Eride (Rock) will be at Durty 

Nellies, 55 N. Bothwell, Palatine' at 10 p.m., $3 cover charge. Call •. 

358-9150: 

Saturday, Nov. 1 

Lynne Jordan & The Shiver (Swingin' R&B) perform at Slice 
of Chicago, call 991-2150. Booze Brothers play at Chicago Blue 
Note, $6 cover, call 776-9850. Durty Nellies will host Birds at the 
End of the Road (Alt. Rock), 10 p.m. show, $3 cover, call 358- 
9150. Duke O'Briens play host to 6 Foot Graphic, 10 p.m. show, 
$3 cover, call (815)356-9980. 



I i 




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Spirit 



From page Bl 

to the Reunion life Center in 
Kalamazoo, Mich., where she stud- 
ied energy life balancing. 

It was at this time that she was 
considering parting from Body 
Therapeutics. She had a vision and r_ 
had written a business plan for a 
medical center which would . 
include physicians, chiropractors, 
nurses, herbalists, massage thera- - 
pists and more. She couldn't find 
the funding for the concept at first 
and had stored it away. But one 
year ago, a parent company, 
Edgewater Rehab, was looking to 
invest in a holistic health care facil- 
ity. "They thought holistic health 
care was just about ready to pop," 
said Roos Bockwinkel. 

Partners in Healing in 
Northbrook was born and Roos 
Bockwinkel serves as center direc- 
tor. Like Roos Bockwinkel's vision, 
the center brings together practi- 
tioners in the health fields from 
physicians to psychotherapists to 
massage therapists to herbalists. 

"We're changing the way medi- 
cine is practiced. We have patients, 
but we also have clients. We edu- 
. cate, we give choices. We look at 
things through the mind, body and 
spirit," she said. 

Roos Bockwinkers venture into 
writing started with meditation. 
When meditating, she would listen 
to her inner voice and write down 
what she heard. 

"My writing started coming out 
and it was awesome. It was very 
wise," she recalled. 

After three years of writing 
down her thoughts, she considered 
publishing. She said she knew the 
information was good, but wasn't 
, sure about the writing. As it hap- 
pens, one of her clients was an 
author and she let him read some 
of her work. He thought it was very 
good and encouraged her to pur- 
sue that path. 



When she started writing her 
book, she thought she was writing 
a short adult fairy tale, but she 
kept seeing more and more scenes 
and the work grew. 

"I didn't have to research a lot. 
It just flowed out," said Roos 
Bockwinkel. "I entered an expand- 
ed state of knowing." 

Her author friend, Paul 
Neimark, was impressed with the 
work and helped edit it. 

The book was published by 
Mind and Miracles, out of Florida 
and has just hit the book racks. 
Mind and Miracles was the first 
publisher of the best-selling book 
"A Course in Miracles." 

Set in the lltli century," 
Rhiannon: Truth Seeker" is the tale 
of the spiritual journey of a young 
girl who leaves her family to live 
with her grandmother and study 
■ to be a priestess. The story brings 
in many philosophies from the 



spiritualistic, holistic healing and 
New Age movements. 

Roos Bockwinkel already has 
written scenes for a second book, 
"Rhiannon II: Truth Bearer." 

Along the way on her path, 
Roos Bockwinkel married Greg 
Bockwinkel and had three chil- 
dren, Chani, 8; Yuri, 6; and Kara, 4. 
The last two were bom in Lake 
Villa — they were home births. 

Roos Bockwinkel's latest foray - 
is the ministry; she was ordained 
in August. ' 

She explains she started a 
course in ministry at the school in 
Kalamazoo, buthad no intention 
of becoming ordained. 

As part of her ministry pro- 
gram, Roos Bockwinkel started to 
write a prayer book. It was to be a 
small desk- top published book she 
could give away. As with her other 
projects, this one also grew. The 
prayer book, with the help of a 



photographer friend, will be a 
glossy book with beautiful pho- 
tographs from professionals from 
throughout the country. 

There will also be a line of 
posters and cards. 

As her path continues to fork in 
different directions, Roos 
Bockwinkel plans to cut back some 
on her duties at Partners in 
Healing with the hiring of a center 
manager. But at the same time, she 
has an inspiration for a non-profit 
organization Infinity Foundation 
which would offer education pro- 
grams based on mind /body/spirit. 

She said she would like to offer 
some programs out in the Lake 
' Villa/Antioch area and thinks peo- 
ple in her own community would 
be very welcoming. 

"My sense from being in the 
area is that there is a real hunger 
out there for spirituality," said . 
Roos Bockwinkel. 



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LAKELIFE LAkelANd NEWspAptas November 1, 1996 



-MoviE Pick — — — 1 — — 

Top performances carry 'Sleepers' 



Director Barry Levinson, bor- 
rowing more than a little "shtick" 
from fellow directors Martin 
Scorsese and Francis Ford 
Coppola, utilizes Robert De Niro's 
penchant for coming through 
with a top performance in a 
"mob" flick to bring us this sea- 
sons "Good Fella." 

The string of unbelievable 
coincidences, and the unreal 
unfolding of events that make up 
the script of "Sleepers," is held 
together when top actors like De 
Niro, Dustin Hoffman, Brad Pitt 
and Kevin Bacon do their thing 
with a flare. 

In the cast list alone, we have 
the makings of a fine movie that 
woulcfhave been another triumph 
for Levinson and Hoffman like 
"Rainman," if they had used a bet- 
ter story, that's if audiences 
haven't had enough of depressing 
gangster glorification, despite the 
Oscar connections. 

The tale of four boys raised in 
Bogart's and Cagney's territory of 
New York's Hell's Kitchen, who are 
mentally and sexually abused by 
twisted reform school guards, led 
by Bacon, when they are jailed for 
a robbery flub/almost death, is a 
good base for a riveting movie. 

It's when the grown up victims 
of the prison system get together 




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Joe Perrino, Geoff Wigdor, Brad Renfro, Jonathan Tucker play four 
residents of Hell's Kitchen who suffer unjustly in reform school. 



to exact their revenge on Bacon 
and company that all the plot's 
weak links start snapping. Two of 
these, now full-fledged killers exe- 
cute Bacon. 

Now here's the rub, A third vic- 
tim, Pitt, now an assistant D. A., 
gets to be his buddies' prosecutor. 
Of course Pitt got his job without 
anyone noting his prison time and 
past mob affiliations. 

The fourth victim, Jason, has 
grown into the reporter who even- 
tually writes "Sleepers," for posteri- 
ty while working to get his pals off. 
De Niro is the boys', religious men- 
tor who is now asked to give them 
an alibi under oath to the God he 
serves. 

"Sleepers" pluses are led by 
award-winning performances by 





UPSERVICE 

It's the talk 
of the town 



■ 



Disney's Cruise Ship 
"The Magic" 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

Last week we talked about the "complete Disney experience" which Disney has created with its new 
cruise/resort package and touched a tittle on Disney's new ship, "The Magic". (Don't gel confused Premier 
Cruise Line's "The Dig Red Boat" which, at one time, licensed the Disney name and had Disney characters 
on board. The "Magic" is Disney's first ship). 

As I mentioned last week, even with an April 10, 1998 launch date, many of the Magic's first sailing 
are already sold out! * 

As would be expected, there's plenty to do for kids on board the Disney Magic. With 16,000 square 
feet dedicated solely to children, the Magic has more than ten times the area offered by most other ships. 
The children's space is separated into various age programs for the younger kids with an additional 
separate teen club. Baby-sitting will also be available for the real little guys. 

The over 30 counselors onboard will put the kids into small groups of six to eight. They'll then be 
able to partake or activities ranging from interactive stage presentations to fun with computers for the 3-8 
year olds and inventor's and animation's workshops for the 9-12 year olds. Since teens prefer less 
structured activities, Disney will ofTer them programs such as innovative elements ofa New York-lhcmcd 
coffee bar. 

This doesn't mean the Disney Magic is going to be crawling with screaming kids. In fact,, it will be 
just the opposite. With an 85,000 ton ship (I'm still not sure what (hat means, suffice to say it's big) there 
will be plenty of room to keep kids activities separate from adults traveling without children (or those who 
want some time away from their kids). The Magic will offer an adults only restaurant, teak deck swimming 
pool, and three clubs in the adults only entertainment area. Even Disney's private island (one of the 
Magic's ports of call) has a 1 .5 mile adults-only beach. 

There will, of course, be many family activities offered. After all, this is a Disney ship. 

Dining, lob, will be different onboard the Magic. In addition to the adults only restaurant mentioned 
above, the Magic will feature three themed restaurants instead or the usual large main dinning room. 
Guests will dine in a different restaurant each night, though their servers will remain the same. 

It looks like Disney is doing everything right in it's first venture into the cruise business, but would 
you expect anything less from the people who revolutionized theme parks? 

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De Niro and Hoffman, who plays 
the boys' alcoholic defender. Pitt 
and Patric have the same attrac- 
tion, talent and draw once welded 
by a young Marlon Brando or Paul 
Newman. 

' Minnie Driver, of "Circle of 
Friends," minus a few pounds, 
plays a neighborhood friend that 
helps Pitt set-up his web of deceit 
and lies designed to get the boys 
off and reveal the indignities per- 
formed by Bacon and company. 

Its debits scream loudly with 
the lack of credulity created by the 
story and our fill of the glorification 
of the underworld. Somehow we 
just don't buy the stories' claim to 
actuality. 

"Sleepers," rated "R" for all die 
usual reasons, tries to make a case 
for one wrong justifying another.. 
This is not our idea of entertain- 
ment, but the fine acting and all ' 
too graphic scenes that do make us 
experience, maybe more than we 
care to, draw a three out of five star 
rating.— by GLORIA DAVIS 

Hammond returns . 
to Zanies Comedy Club 

Darrell Hammond, resident 
impressionist in his second season 
with the cast of NBC's Saturday 
Night Live, will kick-off Zanies 18th 
Anniversary Celebration Nov. 7 to 
9 in Chicago. 

Zanies is located at 1548 N. 
Wells in Chicago. Showtimes are 
Thursday at 8:30 p.m.; Friday at 
8:30 and 10:30 p.m.; Saturday at 7, 
9 and 11:15 p.m. For tickets call, 
(312)337-4027. 



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FRI.-SUN. 2:15,4:45,7:15,9:45 

I MON.-THUR. 4:45, 7:15. 9:45 



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FR1.- SUN. 1:50, 3:50, 5:50, 7:5D, 9:50 
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SATURdAy- 



Wauconda Food Pan try set meeting 

The annual meeting of the Wauconda/Islarid Lake Food Pantry will 
be held on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 8 a.m., In the meeting room of ttie 
Wauconda Village hall. The public is Invited to.ottend. For further infor- 
matlonVcQlI Carol Ward at 526-3914. 
LGAFCE plans craft fair 

The Lake County Assn, of Home and Community Education {for- 
merly Lake County Homemakers Extension Assn.) is presenting a 300 
plus member Flea Market and Craft Show on Saturday, Nov. 2 from 9 
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Lake .County Cooperative Extention Service 
Auditorium, 100 S. Hwy. 45 (two blocks north of Rte. 120) in Grayslake. 
For further.informatlon contact, Carole Dreyer at 587-7548. 
Lake Zurich Lions Club holds bazaar 

The Lake Zurich Lions Club Holiday Bazaar will be held Saturday, 
Nov. 2 at Lake Zurich High School, 300 Church St, south of Rte. 22. 
There will be two gymnasiums filled with a wide variety of gift items 
perfect for the holidays from merchants from northern Illinois and'v 
Wisconsin/Admission is $2. Plenty of parking, and handicap and stroller 
accessible. Show hours are. from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



MoNdAy 



Join Harrington Woman's Club Literature Group 

The group meets on Monday; Nov. 4 to enjoy the always delightful 
Barbara Rinella for a review of the "Robert Frost Biography" by Jeffrey 
Meyers. Rinella is well-known in the Barrington areaand participants' 
can expect to meet Frost personally through her in-depthinterpreta- 
tlon. Light refreshments will be served at 12:30 p.m. at the Barrington 
Area Library in the Zimmerman Room followed by the book review at 1 
p.m. For further information, call 304-8502. 



CoiviiNq Soon 



Friends of Sparrow plan gala event 

Friends of Sparrow 1940's theme gala "In The Mood" will be held. 
Saturday, Nov. 9 at 6:30 p.m. at the Biltmore Country Club, 160 Biltmore 
Dr., Barrington. Tickets are $100 per person, raffle tickets available for 
three for $25. Reservation deadline is Nov. 2 and can be made by con- 
tacting Nancy at 381-6211. 

Lake County Women's Club seeks members 

New to the area? Or just looking for an organization to share Inter- 
ests with other women. Lake County Women's Club oilers its members 
morning and evening coffees, couple's socials, bowling and golf, out to 
lunch group, needKicraft, bridge, out and about group, theater outings, • 
antiquing, ethnic dining, wine tasting, walking and hiking and others. ' 
Take your pick! To obtain further Information about Lcwc, con caroi m 
949-1903 or Gail at 549-1406. . \ '' i .< • 

Blue Lights Senior Club moves meeting place 

The Blue Lights Senior Club has moved their first-and third 
Thursday meetings to Bertrand's Bowling Alley at 2612 Washington St., 
Waukegan. The time is still 7:30 p.m The next meeting is set for 
Thursday, Nov. 7. For further Information, call 623-5706 or 623-1147. 

New Lake County Knitting Guild formed 

A new knitting guild, the Nifty Knitters Knitting Guild, affiliated 
with The Knitting Guild of America, has been formed. The purpose of 
the guild Is to promote die advancement of the craft of knitting through 
education and charitable works. The guild will be meeting monthly, 
interested knitters with any level of experience should call 362-8133 or 
362-5433 for further information. 



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IF-SU 11:45, 2:10. 435, 7:00, 935; M-TH 435, 7:00, &35 



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1f-SUU0O,MO,MO, 630. 630, WO; UTH 4:40, «0,B3Q, 10:10 I 



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THE ASSOCIATE PG-13 

F-SU 11:40, EOS, 430, 635, 920; M-TH 430, 635, 9-3) 



THINNER* R 

F-SU 1:20, 325, 530, 7:45, 930; M-TH 530, 7*5, 9i0 



GHOST IN THE DARKNESS R 

F-SU 1230, 2*5,535, 735, BSfrMTH&OS, 735, 955 



FIRST WIVES CLUB PC 

F-SU 1230, 255, 5:15,730, 335; M-TH 5:15, 730, 9*5 



LONG KISS GOODNIGHT R 

F-SU 11:45,2:15, 4*5, 7:15,8*5; M-TH 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 



MICHAEL COLLINS R 

F-SU 12*5, 3:45. 6:40, 935; M-TH 535, 6:15 



TO GILLIAN ON 37TH BIRTHDAY PG-13 

F-SU 1 SO, 3:10. 530. 730, 9:40; M-TH 530. 730. 9.40 



I GLIMMER MAN R 
F-SU 1230, 430, 935; M-TH 430. 935 



ITHAT THING YOU DO 

If-TH 235,7:10; M-TH 7:10 



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NovEMbER 1, 1996 UkElANd Newspapers LAKELIFE 



The dreaming season begins WMM Cho 




"I hope that peony bush will bloom this spring!" 
How many times have you wondered as you are 
planting something new, what the end result will 
be? I believe all gardeners share a vision, call it a 
dream. We like to imagine how we can add beauty 
into our lives and those 



/■*' 



''fi&ffil 




'Jtonhial 



.'> 



by Lydia Hu 



of others by the design 
of our gardens. lam 
sure you have experi- 
enced moments when a 
gardeners' palette 
sparked your senses and 
you were filled with 
awe. I really believe 
nothing is as beautiful 
as a garden in full 
bloom. 

What were your gar- 
dening successes this 

season, your failures? Did you plant some annuals 
that just never got off the ground, or did you try a 
new perennial and it took off tremendously? 

The best way for us to remember what worked 
and what did not is to start a garden journal. All 
you need is a pen and a notebook. Jot down the 
varieties of herbs, veggies, and flowers that you 
enjoyed this season. It is helpful to note where you 
planted them, how happy (or maybe not so happy) 
you were with the end result. When a new idea for 
a garden design strikes you, write about it! Then 
come planting season you can incorporate these 
ideas in your garden. 

Gardening is a hands on learning experience. 
We gardeners set many dreams and hopes into the 
soil. They all don't work! Some years the bugs feast 
on our prize roses, rabbits devour our lettuce, 
worms do in the apples, but there is always next 
year! We can count on the emergence of the green 
grass, the budding of the trees, the daffodils poking 
their heads through the melting snow. 

Journaling is also a helpful way for you to 
become acquainted with different varieties of flow- 
ers. Which ones you would like to grow for their 
vibrant color, their perfume, for cutting, drying etc. 
Each species has its own personality. (I never met a 
flower I didn't like)! So, jot down which ones you 
feel the need to grow. In this way your garden 
begins to reflect you and your personality. 

Although it is sad when our flowers wilt and die, 



we know they need to rest over the winter. Before 
that final hard frost hits your roses and other flow- 
ers, gather the petals and dry them. You can pick 
the stems and hang them to dry. Rose petals can be 
dried quickly in the microwave. Place the petals 

. between paper toweling 
| and zap on medium for 



1*1 several minutes. Once 
fi you have dried the 
| petals you can make 
- , potpourri with them. 

tYou can enjoy your gar- 
m den over the winter and 
m beyond. 

Here is a basic recipe 
(use whatever dried 
flowers and herbs you 
have on hand). You can 
purchase orris root at a 




health food store and vermiculite at a garden nurs- 
ery. 
Basic garden potpourri 

3 cups flower petals 

1/2 to 1 cup herbs and leaves (try thyme, 

lemon basil, rosemary) 

6 Tbls. crushed spices (cinnamon, cloves, 

allspice) 

1/2 cup dried citrus slices (slice thin and 

dry In oven overnight at 200 degrees 

1 1/2 ounces vermiculite or orris root 

powder 

6 drops scented oils (rose, lavender) 

Combine dried flowers and leaves in a large 
glass bowl. Add crushed spices and mix with your 
fingers. If you are using vermiculite as a fixative, 
mix with oil in a covered jar; add oil to vermiculite 
until mixture is scented, but not oily. Carefully 
blend vermiculite mixture with petals and spices 
until mixture is fragrant. If you are working with 
delicate petals you may want to work them in after 
you've added the oil. If you use orris root, mix it 
first with the petals, then add oil to the mixture a 
drop at a time until the scent seems strong enough. 
Place the mixture in a ziplock bag, seal tightly, and 
store in a dark place about six weeks until the fra- 
grance mellows. Shake the bag every other day to 
mix. Once the potpourri has mellowed, place in a 
pretty bowl and enjoy. 

Happy dreaming! 



Lake County 
children to 
sing in 'Joseph' 

Nine Lake County children 
who are part of a 23 member choir 
oft eh Jubilate Children's Choir 
will be singing in the upcoming 
production of "Joseph and the 
Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" 
at the Chicago Theatre. 

• The Jubilate Children's Choir 
consists of six different choirs who 
rehearse in Northfield and 
Libertyville.The children range in 
ages from 6 to 17 and are from 
many communities throughout 
the northern Chicagoland area. 
The 23 members of the "Joseph" ' 
choir was one of 16 children's 
choir that auditioned to be in 
"Joseph." Four choirs were select- 
ed to perform. Jubliate is paired 
with the Morraine Valley 
Children's Choir and will sing at 
four performances a week. 

The nine Lake County chil- 
dren include: Kristen Mikrut and 
Henry Clapp of Lake Forest; 
Caroline Younts of Grayslake; 
Elisabeth Augsberger, Alex Lauder 
and Brian O'Connor of 
Libertyville; and Jenna Johnson, 
Kristin Wegner and Karis Munley 
ofMundelein. 

Upcoming performances for 
the Jubliate Children's Choir 
include The Festival of Trees on 
Saturday, Nov. 23 at Midlane 
Country Club and their Annual 
Holiday Concert at New Trier 
West in Northfield on Sunday, 
Dec. 8. 

$\ For more information about 

the "Jr icrformances or the 

Jubliai Jren's Choir call 446- 
5016. 



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SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT 

JAnJEDALLSmDAL 



SPECIAL WEEKEND 
LATE SHOWS! 



rRIDflY nOVEfflRER I A - WOpm 
DOUBLE FEATURE! 

CTARTKK QTHE SEARCH 

-3!nn I nfiFu*> forspock 

_SrARTRSL4 THE H V oT E 



TR€K FILM FGSTIWPiL 

Advanced Tickets On Sale Now! 



HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME every Saturday 

NOVEMBER 2nd &3rd - 2:00PM & 4:00PM NIGHT 11 :00 PM 



nwr 





Cm nix Ou Cm 



CiNEpUx OdEON ThEATRES 



RIVERTREE COURT 



Dear God (PG) (Dolby Stereo) - No Passes . 
Fri., Moa-Thur. 7:10, 9-30; Sal.-Sun. (120) 4:10, 7;10, 9:30 



Larger Titan Life (PG) (Drs-Digitat) 

Fri., Mon.-Thurs. 7:45, 955; Sat.-Sun. (1:15) 3:25, 5:35, 7:45, 9JS 



To Gillian On Her 37th Birthday (PG-W (Dolby Steno) 

Fri.. Mon-Thur. 7:40. 955: Sat.-Sun- Q:10> 3:20, 530, 7:40, 9:55 



Michael Collins (K) (Dolby Stmo) - No Passes 
Fri., Mon-Thur 630, 9-.2S; Sal.-Sun. (1:00) 3:40, 630, 935 



Sleepers (W (DTS Digital) 

Fri., Mon.-Thur. 6:45, 9:40; Sal.-Sun (1:00) 3:50, 6:45. 9:40 



Tlie Ghost and the Darkness (R) (DTS stem) 

Fri., Mnn.-Thur. 735. 9:40; Sat.-Sun. (ISO) 430. 735, 9:40 



Tfie First Wives Club (PG) (Dolby steno) 

Fri., Mon. - Thur. 730, 950; Sat.-Sun. (2:10) 430, 7:20, 9S0 



Tftat Tiling You Do (PG) (DTS Steno) 

Fri., Mon. - Thur. 7:00, 930; Sat.-Sun. (130) 350, 7:00, 930 



HAWTHORN CENTER 



Romeo & Juliet (PG-13) (Dotty Stereo) - No Pusses 
Fri., Mon.-Thuis. 7:00, 9:40; Sat.-Sun. (1:15, 430) 7:00, 9.40 



High School High (PG-n) 

Fri., Mon. - Thur. 735, 935; Sat.-Sun. (1:15, 3:15, 5:15) 735, 935 



'No Passes 



Stephen King's Tf tinner <R) (Dolby Steno) - No Pitsses 

Fri., Mon. - Thur. 7:15, 935; Sal.-Sun. (1:00, 3:00, 5:00) 7:15, 935 

The Associate (PG-73) 

Fri., Mon. - Thur.7:10, 9:45; Sat.-Sun. (130, 430) 7:10, 9:45 






^•.f5>' 



1 ~ JzZT&Qir-L' ''.It 



comic 
relief to please both genders 

Exploring the differences between the sexes, Robert Dubac hoists a 
thick volume bearing the title "The Rules." When he cracks it open, all: 
the. pages are blank because, as the actor/standup comic observes, -'., 
women are always changing the script 

This is one of many sight gags in 
"The Male Intellect", (an oxymoron), 
ymrtenarid performed by Dubac at 
Chicago's Mercury Theater, 3745 N. 
Southport 

The stage is designed to represent the 
male brain. The uncluttered right hemi- 
sphere, the feminine side, has little but a 
small window, curtains and a chalk- 
board, while the leftside is a jumble of 
fHe cabinets stuffed with beer bottles and 
other odds and ends. 

For an uninterrupted 90 minutes, . 
Dubac, as Bobby, analyzes with amiable 
wit where the relationship with his girl- 
friend went sour. Was it lies, inserisitivity, 
inattentiveriess?Gr did such habits as Robert Dubac 
eating like a pig and belching on cue play 
apart? 

To help his explication, he assumes the role of a half dozen charac- 
ters, which collectively define his version of the male ego. With mini- 
mal costume alterations, he becomes swaggering Fast Eddie, the pas- 
sion philanthropist; an abstract philosopher, Jean-Michel; old Mr. 
Linger, who has learned the secret of time management; the politically 
incorrect Ronnie Cabrezzi, and the know-it-all Colonel. 

In the long run, "The Male Intellect" provides enough insight— not 
to mention comic relief—to please both genders. See this highly amus- 
ing show through Nov. 24. For ticket information, call (312)325-1700.— 
byTOMWITOM 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 




'SUPER COP (PG-13)- Jackie Chan 

KFri & Mon- Thur. Call For Times 
K-l< 



D 



Sat. & Sun. 1:15, 3:00, 5:30, 7:30 



B INDEPENDENCE DAY (PG-13) • Jell GoldWu'm 
C Fri. & Mon. - Thur. 6:30, 9:20 
Bsat. & Sun. 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:20 

J] THE NUTTY PROFESSOR (PG-13) - BdtJo Murphy 
fjFtl. & Mon. - Thur. 7:15 
[]Sai. & Sun. 1:10, 3:10, 7:15 



A TIME TO KILL (R) 

DAILY 9:20 



&2.00 all s eats all shows 

Ample Parking Jj 

Samuel Jackson LI 
LI 
ESCAPE FROM LA. (R> - LI 

Kurt Russell rj 

DAILY 5:10, 9:35 £j 

BULLETPROOF (RJ - Damon Wayans^J 
Fri. & Mon. - Thur. 5:20. 7:20, 9:40 tJ 

Sat. & Sun. 1 :0£L 3: 1 5, 5:20, 7:20, 9:40 LI 



EuuuuuuHuyuuuuuauuuQuuuuduu'yubu^Quya 



FOX LAKE THEATRE (&< 

115 Lakeland Plaza ■ Fox Lake g 



PLAYING 11/1 • 11/7 



(847)973-2800 *2£ $ 



GEN ADMISSION $5 



LARGER THAN LIFE* (PG) 

FRI. 5:15, 7:50, 1Ck05 

SAT.12:20, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10*5 

„„ SUN./WED.1220, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50 

DTS M0N7TUEJTHUR. 5:15, 750 



DEAR GOD* (PG) - 

FRI. 5:05, 7:30, 1&00 
SAT. 12:10, 2:35, 5*5, 7:30, NWX) 
UN. /WED. 12:10, 2:35, 5:05, 7:30 
m MON/TUE/THUR, 5*5, 7:30 



THINNER (R) 

FRI. 5:25, 8:00, 10:10 
SAT. 12:30, 2:45, 5:25, 8:00, 10:10 

, ^UN-ZWED. 12:30, 2:45, 5:25, &00 

msE^m MON. /TUE./THUR. 5:25, 6:00 



SLEEPERS (R) 

FRI. 5:05, 8:10 

SAT7SUN7WED. 1:00, 5:05, 8:10 

»»S^e MONJTUEJTHUR. 5:05, 8:10 



HIGH SCHOOL HIGH* (PG-13) 

FRI. 5:35, 8:20, 10:15 SUN JWED. 12:40, 230, 5:35. 8:20 
SAT. 12:40, 2:50, 5:35, 8:20, 10:15 MON./TUE/THUR. 5:35, 850 



*NO PASSES OR COUPONS 



Where Movie Going Is Stitl Fun And Affordable 



MOVIES & TIMES START FRIDAY 11/1/96 






Located on Rt. 12 Near 22 

&' 847-550-0000 

• Surround Sound 10 Screens 



$6.50 Adults After 5 P.M. 
S3.50 Children Under 11 



ADULTS $4.00 CHILDREN $2.00 
$2.00 BARGAIN MATINEE TILL 5 P.M. 



FUf AWAIT HOME (PG) 

SaL& Sun. 2:15, 4:30 



i 



3 



M Daily Afternoon Shows 
Mon.-Fri. Till 5 PM 
Sat & Sun. Till 2:30 PM 



I TIN CUP (ft) * 2 - 00 ALL SEATS ' AL1 - shows 
Fit & Mon. - Thur . 730; SaL & Sua 7 JO 



• LIBERTY 1&2 (847) 362-3011 • 

* 708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville .• 



I 



? ] 



LARGER THAN UFE(PG) 1:30.4:00,6:45,9.00 < 



ROMEO AND PET (PG-13) 12:45. 3:45, 6:25, 9:00 



- MICHAEL C0UINS(R) 12:20, 3:25. 6:20. 950 



- SLEEPERS (R) 



1:15, 4:30, 8:00 



I THAI THING YOU DO (PG) 3:00,6:00,8:30 



THE ASSOCIATE (PG-13) 1 :45, 4:15, 6:40, 9:10 



TOE FIRST WIYTJCUIB(K) 12:45,3:15,6:15,8:45 



THINNER (R) 



1:45,4:00,6:40,8:55 



DEAR GOD (PG) 



1:00,330,6:00,855 



M: MrGHTT DOCKS (P6) 



12:30 



TOE GHOST AND THE DARKNESS (R) 1230, 3.00, 630, 850 



ADULTS $4.00 CHILDREN 1 1 & UNDER $2.00 

S2.00 BARGAIN MATINEE: 
SAT A SUN. UNTIL 230 



FUT AWAT HOME (PG) 

Sat. & Sun. 1:45. 4:00 



LONG KISS GOODNIGHT (ft) 

Fri. 6 JO, 8:45: SaL & Sun. 635. 6:45; Mon. ■ Thur. 7:1 5 



MIGHTY DUCKS 03 (PG) 
Sal. S Sun. 2:15. 4 J3Q 



THE CHAMBErTrT" 
Frt. 6:45. 9;0O;S3Li Sua 



6:45, 9:00; Moa- Thur. 730 



McHENRY 1 & 2 

1204 N. Green St. (815) 385-0144 
ADULTS S4.00 CHILDREN 11 & UNDER S2.50 



$1 .50 Bargain Maiinco Uniil 5 pm 



lrgain Maiinco 

IME (PG) 



FLY AWAY HOME (PG) 

Fri. 6:30-8:45; Mon. - Thur. 7:15 
SaL & Sun. 2.00 , 4:15. 6:30. B:45 



JOS aLl Seats All shows 

TIN CUP (R) 

Fri. 7:30; Mon. -Thur. 7:30 

Sat. & Sun. 1:30,4:30,7:30 









RaUmaBBEBBH^BBBRSBBH 




LIPSERVICE UkElANd Newspapers NovEMbcit 1, 1996 



LiPSERVICE 

It's tIhe taLI< oF tIhe town 

Get It oFF youR cIhest (847)225-8075 




Lipservice is a phone-in coiumn presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to • 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does not 
claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to 
edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 
and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the call is 
anonymous, please leave your village name. \ 



Whiners, stay away 

l was at Antioch's recent 
Halloween Howl event, which 
was very well attended and 
enjoyed by many people. The 
thing that gets me Is that no 
matter how great an event is, 
there are still people who need 
to find something to complain 
about. I was standing at the 
entrance to the Jaycee "Tunnel 
of Terror" and saw a woman 
yelling at the "Jason" with the 
chainsaw, telling him he 
shouldn't run the chainsaw and 
scare her kids. Well, why 
would she take her small chil- 
dren there instead of the 
Witches Kitchen or the other 
less intense areas? The Jaycees 
even posted signs saying that 
the "Tunnel" was for ages 13 
and up. I even saw people try- 
ing to force their kids to go in. 
Those are the same people that 
complain when their kid gets' 
scared out of their wits. My sug- 
gestion is to keep your whiny 
selves at home, because it's 
impossible to please you once 
you walk out the door. Thanks 
to Antioch and the Jaycees for 
making the Halloween Howl 
the success that it is — keep up 
the great work! 

Making a difference 

Thank you to the citizens of 
Lake County who took the time 
to register to vote. Together we 
can make a difference! — 
Sharon Fyfe, Village Clerk of • 
Round Lake Beach 

Paper pushers beware 

I'm sick of those people passing 
out pamphlets and putting them 
in my mailbox and on my door. 
They just blow around the 
neighborhood. When is the vil- 
lage going to make distributing 
these illegal? Other villages 
have done this. 

Teach by example 

l have read that Woodview 
School in Grayslake is hosting a 
multi-cultural fair. Isn't this the 
same school district in which 
there is conflict between par- 
ents, school officials and teach- 
ers? Accepting and understand- 
ing differences starts at home. 
Children learn by example. 

Wasted time 

I was disappointed to see the 
comment "What a mess" in 
Lipservice. The comment 
should have been devoted to 
why we're bothering to print 
the time wasted by the city 
board on things that two engi- 
neering companies agreed to 
on the plumbing. The real ques- 
tion is why is the county board 
wasting time with Trustee 
Soderman's personal agenda? 



Obsessed with power 

Bill Clinton recently said you 
can't believe a word Saddam 
Hussein -says, you have to 
watch what he does. I must say, 
it's a very astute observation, 
one that perfectly describes 
Clinton himself. After all, it 
takes one to know one. Clinton 
is obsessed with power, gov- 
ernment power. We must over- 
come the influence of the news 
media and elect Bob Dole for 
president. It's amazing how 
poorly informed Americans are. 
Americans would demand 
Clinton's resignation if they 
knew all about him. We can't 
afford another four years of 
"anything goes." 

Fix curb 

What is wrong with Antioch? 
When are they going to fix the 
curb at Main and Lake? People 
are tripping and falling. My dad 
fell there yesterday and if he's 
hurt, I'm going to nail them. 

Get on the move 

$5,586 a year is embarrassing 
for Grant Township residents to 
see. I would like to see pub- 
lished a job description of what 
they actually do. Do they meet 
once a week for over $500 a 
month? Wake up, Grant 
Township. Elect new officials 
and get this part of the county 
on the move. The only one who 
deserves his pay is the road 
commissioner. 

Great concern 

I was really struck by some of 
the things the TV media have 
been saying, even those who 
were for the Democrats. 
Everyone has said Jack Kemp is 
a good, fair-minded individual. 
And they've said that Bob Dole 
is truly a decent man. I think 
that says a lot. Bill Clinton and 
his wife have been surrounded 
by so much controversy and 
he's surrounded himself with 
people that have many charac- 
ter flaws and problems. I think 
this is of great concern to those 
of us who are trying to raise our 
children with a good example. 

Print info 

I agree with the caller who said 
the paper should print informa- 
tion on sex offenders. I think 
this is public information, but 
you have to jump through 
hoops to get it. It's important to 
publish this so people can pro- 
tect their children. 

Keep it up 

I would like to say that 
Lakeland Newspapers is the 
most dedicated news organiza- 
tion in Lake County. With all 
their newspapers, they cover 



the county quite well. I just 
wish it came out every day. 
Congratulations, Lakeland, 
keep up the good work. 

Holding back 

I'd like to voice my concern 
about the investigations ongo- 
ing involving federal law 
enforcement agencies. The 
Flight 800 crash hasn't been 
solved, the Atlanta bombing 
hasn't been solved, and the 
train wreck in the Arizona 
desert hasn't been solved. I 
think investigators hold back 
from the public important infor- 
mation. 

Look at priorities 

I was astonished to learn that 
Libertyville Township Super- 
visor Ralph Swank draws a 
salary of $51,000 for a part- 
time job. Mr. Swank is 
employed full-time by his fami- 
ly's insurance business in 
Waukegan and I don't believe 
he devotes anywhere near 
$51,000 worth of time to his 
job as township supervisor. 
This position is pretty much run 
by the township clerk, who gets 
$16,000 a year for a full-time 
job. I think we should look at 
our priorities here. 

The choice is mine 

I agree with the others who 
have said they won't vote for 
Al Salvi. I won't be voting for 
him or any other candidate 
who believes in reversing 
Roe vs. Wade. . What gives 
these politicians the right to 
make such an important 
moral decision for me or any 
other woman? This is a deci- 
sion that is arrived at with 
much thought, discussion, . 
reasoning and emotion and 
should be between a woman, 
her partner, and her doctor 
only. It's no one else's busi- 
ness. I don't, see Al Salvi or 
any other pro-lifers out there 
offering solutions on what to 
do with all these babies once 
they're born, either. In my 
heart, I am pro-life — I could 
never abort a child that I'm 
carrying. But I sure would 
fight for the legal right- that 
says this is a decision every 
woman can make for herself, 
with no interference from the 
government. 

What to do? 

I'm another one complaining 
about cats. My husband is 87 
and I'm 81 and we enjoy our 
birds tremendously. But we 
can't enjoy them any longer 
because the neighbor next door 
has a cat and he has a bird of 
ours in the front yard almost 
every morning we wake up. 
Now we had to take our bird- 
bath down because the cat 
waits for them to bathe. We 
bought a trap to trap him to take 
him to the police and report it 
and someone stole it from the 
yard. What are we supposed to 
do next? 



Show the flag 

I'm wondering what happened 
to the logo that Lakeland had. 
Aren't we proudly displaying 
our flag on the cover anymore? 
I'm disappointed. Let's show 
our flag! 

Get facts first 

This is in response to the mes- 
sage titled "Let it go." Get all 
the facts on Whitewater, Vince 
Foster, Ron Brown, Bosnia, and 
the Iraq caper. Then see if you 
can "let it gb." 

Time for change 

Citizens of Antioch, if you 
answer no to any of the follow- 
ing, it's time for a change: 1 . Do 
you want high-density housing? 

2. Do you want our village to 
remain a developer's paradise? 

3. Do you want your decisions 
made for you without your 
voice being heard or ignored? 

4. Do you Want our schools to 
remain overcrowded? 5. Do 
you want our precious wet- 
lands and waterways left in 
check? 6. Do you want the 
incompetence to remain in our 
local government? Vote for a 
better Antioch and let's get rid 
of Marilyn and all her stooges. 

Fight for rights 

Attention, all boat and RV own- 
ers. I live in Cambridge Garden 
and I own a 16-foot boat, 
which is kept neatly in my dri- 
veway. I, along with a neigh- 
bor/ received a violation notice 
warning us to remove our boat 
before Oct. 25. This is because 
a cowardly neighbor has a 
problem with this and reported 
it to the village without coming 
to us first. We decided to get a 
petition signed by all of our 
neighbors on the block. Let's 
get to the village and fight for 
the right to keep our boats and 
RVs in our driveways. 

Why? 

I would like to know why, in 
regard to the fire we had on 
Oct. 13 in Round Lake Beach/ 
Mark Kirshoffer Excavating was 
brought in instead of a local 
excavator? Is it because 
Kirshoffer is a fire chief in 
another village? Let's hear some 
rebuttal on this. 

A contradiction 

Why is Mary Davis still super- 
intendent of District 116? She 
contradicts herself. I read two 
articles and in one she says she 
has no tolerance of gangs and 
'violence and in the other one 
said she couldn't do anything 
when a student can't go to 
school because of gangs. This 
student has to be beat upon 
further before she'll do some- 
thing. 

Keep inspections 

A few months ago Lakeland 
published an article on the 
Round Lake Beach building 
commissioner's idea of discon- 
tinuing the property inspection 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



because he didn't know how to 
enforce the codes. Recently, a 
death occurred because of 
overcrowding — 16 people in 
the same home. How could our 
village board even consider 
doing away with the only pro- 
gram in effect which can pre- 
vent such situations from 
occurring? 

Deregulate politics 

It seems our politicians aren't 
concerned about the .same 
issues as the average taxpayer 
because they have good health 
coverage, and a job. They're 
not worried about NAFTA, 
healthcare for the average per- 
son, etc. We pay the taxes for 
their good coverage, and they 
do nothing about getting cover- 
age for the taxpayer providing 
their coverage. I think we 
should deregulate politicians 
and bring in private firms to run 
the government. ' 

Check it out first 

This is to the person who prints 
the Parkview letter. Why don't 
you check with people before 
you write? The picture of the 
fi rehouse was of the firemen 
draping the firehouse in memo- 
ry of one of their members. 
They were not decorating for 
Halloween. 

Look into records 

In light of recent revelations 
regarding Fox Lake Trustee Jim 
Thillen's dishonest acceptance 
of under the table payments over 
$20,000 for work he supposedly 
did for the Fox Lake Park, I think 
the village should look into 
financial records of the building 
of the community center to see if 
he "donated" as much time to 
that project. The village should 
then accept his resignation, look 
into legal prosecution, and thank 
Jim Pappas for saving the village 
$23,000. 

Ill do it 

I would like to challenge any- 
one out there who skates to call 
the school boards and tell them 
we need a place to go. I'm 
looking to do an Eagle project. 
I'm willing to build a half pipe 
and wilj build it anywhere. All 
the town has to do is have a 
place for it. I'll get it paid' for, 
built, and maintained. If you're 
interested, call the village office 
in Fox Lake and let them know. 

Appalled 

I'm appalled to know that 15 r 
people were living in a tri-level 
in Round Lake Beach. Were you 
neighbors so filled with apathy 
that you did not report this to the 
village, or were your officials 
told and did nothing to enforce 
this law. Allowing people to live 
this way in our village brings 
down our properly value and 
seriously overcrowds our 
schools. Stop boasting about the 
Metra station and start cleaning 
up the village and enforcing laws 
we already have. ; - 



1/ 

'' V-4'V.I 



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■•iiii.iii.f.i* 



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* > • > ■ • . i i * i < * ( i i * 



♦ * i ■ . > . i * i i i . i i t 



NovEMbES 1, 1996 UldANd Newspapers LAKELIFE |j 



■ ■ 






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Abbott employees 

have some g 



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If you choose the Humana PPO, you will have 
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Naveed Ban, M.D. -Waukegan 
Nicholas Bellios, M.D. - Gurnee 
Gopal Bhalala, M.D. - Zion 

* Albino Bismonte, M.D. - Gurnee 

* Renuka Desai, M.D. - Lindenhurst 

m 

John Dunlop, M.D. - lion 

C. David Engstrom, M.D. - lion 

Gerald Frank, M.D. - Libertyvilky/aukegan 

Bruce Frazin, M.D. - Waukegan 

John Freeland, M.D. - Waukegan 

Oscar Giron, M.D. - Grayslake 

WiJfredo Granada, M.D. - Zion 

David Herman, M.D. - Antioch 

Charles Holmberg, M.D. - Waukegan 

Yoginder Kumar, M.D. - Gurnee 

Kang-Yann Lin, M.D. - Waukegan 

Noberto Martinez, M.D. - Waukegan 

Dennis McCreary, M.D. - Zion 

James Monahan, M.D. - Gurnee 

Pedro Palu-Ay, M.D. - Zion 

Rashmikant Patel, M.D. - Lindenhurst, Waukegan 

Robert Schwartzenberg, M.D. - Gurnee 

Chin-Yung See, M.D. - Waukegan 

Dilip Shah, M.D. - Gurnee 

Mohammed Siddique, M.D. - Gurnee 

* Marlene Tanquilut, M.D. - Gurnee 
Alan Thain, M.D. - Antioch 
Dennis Thain, M.D. - Antioch 
Robert Thain, M.D. - Antioch 
Glynis Vashi, M.D. - Park City 
Willard Walton, M.D. - Zion 
^Pediatricians 










Health Options 
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1324 N. Sheridan Road, Waukegan Illinois 60085 





jfffl HOT SPOTS L\l<EUNd Newspapers Novemder I, 1996 




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Sunday: Free Food & Snacks 
Bloody Mary Specials 

MONDAY: ALL BEER $1.00 

TUESDAY: 
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Prizes, Raffles, Giveaways. 

Your Choice Free Turkey or Ham 

Given Away On Football Nights 



6 MICRO BREWS on tap 
MAIN STRE^* 

MAIN STREET lV/te^ 

**% PINTS 

CIGAR FRIENDLY 
' PARROTS COT 

RESORT & BAR 

26083 Spring Grove Rd. 

Antioch, IL. 60002 

(847) 838-9886 

CALL FOR DIRECTIONS! 



10:00 pm -2:00 am 

COME IN AND MEET US AFTER WORK! 

POOL-GAMES-PIZZA 



OPEN 

7 DAYS 

A WEEK 



New Hours: 

M-Th 1 p-mldnfght?? 

Fri. 2p-3 am 

Sat. noon-3 a.m. 

Sun. 11 a.m.-midntght?? 

Party Room Available Up To 150 
Sun. Thru. Tburs. 



B£ 



N 



83 
120 



45 



Book your Office or Holiday Party Now 



. . 




Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 




SERVING LUNCH & DINNER 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Monday thru Friday - Lakehurst 
7 Days a Week - Liberty ville 



#1 



100 N.Milwaukee Ave. 

Iibertvville.IL 

847/816-6988 



OPEN 7 

DAYS A 

WEEK 



Carry Out Specialists 



#2 
911 Lakehurst Road, 

Outalde Lafcehunt Mall 

. Waukegan,!L 
847/473-1660 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



DiMarco's 



Location: 

883 Main St., Antioch, 
IL 

Telephone: 

(847) 395-8883 

Hours: 

Tues. through Sat., 
open at 5 p.m. and on 
Sunday, at 4 p.m. 

Menu: 

Italian fare, seafood, 
salads, pasta dishes 
and all-you-can-eat 
specials. 




DiMarco's in Antioch - 
Donna DiAAarco loves it 

DiMarco's Restaurant has thrived in this 
small town that has brought it much success 
and great reviews. Three-and-one-half star rat- 
ings and countless articles have all helped to 



make the tiny Italian eatery a spe- 
cial place! Owner Donna 
DiMarco says, "This is home," 
and there she wants to be. That is 
very much what DiMarco extends 
to her customers, a comfortable 
at home feeling. 

A delightful menu with afford- 
able prices helps to make any 
evening perfect. DiMarco's is 
famous for its fine Italian cuisine, 
Ravioli Alforno with shrimp, 
Calamari Fritta, Mussels Maritara, 
Strip Steak Fprmaggio, Eggplant 
Francesca and more! 

While the market bears, 
DiMarco's is featuring an every 
Friday all-you-can-eat CRAB 
LEGS at $15.95, and on Saturday, 
LOBSTER TAIL at $1 0.95, or a 
LOBSTER TAIL DINNER at $16.95. 

DiMarco's will also be featuring a 
Christmas Dinner Show on Saturday, Dec. 7, 
at 10 p.m. with special guests Trish Shaefer 
and John Thulin, a musical cabaret experience 
you are bound to enjoy. So, make your reser- 
vations now !!! 




.' "-':-"■"" ■■ ; v t.vH-v ■',- ; -■ ■■■■ •■-. ■'-■• - ■• 



■ 



NowfttbER 1, 1996 UkElANd Newspapers HOT SPOTS I 




AMERICAN BISTRO 



WILD GOOSE CAFE, Gilmer Road, 
Hawthorn Woods, 949-5550. For ' 
4 years, Wild Goose Cafe has been 
Lake County's Best" kept secret. 
Anna and Jeff would personally like 
to invite you to come out and try 
our unique gourmet creations. 
Centrally located in Lake 
County.. .All roads lead to Wild 
Goose Cafe. 



BAKERIES 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. 

Whitney Street, Downtown 
Grayslake, 548-4600. Fresh baked 
pastries, all occasion decorated 
cakes, handmade chocolates, 
espresso/coffee bar, bulk beans, 
gourmet sandwiches, homemade 
salads, soups, hand sliced deli meat 
and cheeses. Gift baskets, gift cer- 
tificates. 1 6 flavors of premium 
hand-dipped ice cream. Outdoor 
cafe. Somethings Brewing is open 
Sunday through Thursday from 5:30 
a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday 
until 10 p.m. $ 



FINE DINING 



STONEGATE TAVERN & GRILL, 

500 Ela Road, Lake Zurich, 438- 
4900. Stonegale Tavern & Grill is all 
new - with new, management, chef 
and enticing menu. Dine in an Olde 
English atmosphere next to a magnifi- 
cent open hearth. Try steaks, 
seafood, chicken, ribs and more pre- 
pared in Stonegate's own special 
way. American cuisine at it's finest. 
Open Monday through Thursday 
from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and 
Saturday.from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; 
and Sunday from 4 to 9 p.m . $$$ 



Check This Section 
Every Week For Dining Out 
Specials And Information! 



Correction 

Parrot's Cove, 26093 Spring 
Grove Rd, Antioch was the 
spotlight feature Oct. 25, 1996. 
The establishment does not 
feature a deli or ice cream par- 
lor as stated in the story. 
Currently, Parrot's Cove is 
serving Best Kosher hot dogs 
along with their large selection 
of beer brands and eight micro 
brews on tap. The bar is closed 
on Monday and Wednesday. 

The Diebold family invites 
everyone to enjoy their cigar 
friendly neighborhood bar on 
Channel Lake. For more infor- 
mation call, 838-9886. 

The errors are deeply 
regretted. 




pa ' a t t3333 r** rI '■rrt i ym-ri'rrr-rt i rr* tfjjjj-j^ hi n 





Come Try The Best Steaks 
In L%KEiCouNwl 



Specializing m Charcoal Grilled Steak, Prime Rib, 
BBQ Ribs, & Steamed Lobster Tails: Children's Menu Available. 



HOURS: Mon.-Th. 4 to 10; Fri.-Sat. 4 to 11; Sun. 4 to 9 

1818 N. Grandwood Drive • G urnee • 356-5200 
% Only 53 Days 'til Christmas! 

?=- Plan your holiday party with the Backyard Steak Pit! 
-> Call us for information and reservations. 



^S^>rJ t* r>?>? , 'T r- r r , r r i ■ • .' r r! t 1 ■ ; f ■ / 



■' ----- ■■ >•-' -'J ■' - ' ■ 



zaztasa 




h\ 






FRIDAYS: SATURDAYS: 
Crab Legs 1 Lobs H r i€" * 



, => O n* s 10 95 ! 

All You Can Eat .! Lobster Tail 

Complete Dinner $16.95 
or Create Your Own Meal 

See me in AntiochS 

t , mmm o^—fr ^ 77\ i 883 Mam St., Antioch 
I m BaCK -f^V jji)^ (847) 395-8883 i 



(847) 395-8883 



H6e Sijtk %<XHdcVUM 

rMEEMBMS 



m. you cam m> 



I 




.■£&te&i<£'&*^:i**^ 



Appetizers'. 

• told Beef 

• Pork w/ Garlic Sauce 

• Polalo Salad 

• Crab Rangoon 



• Roaslcd Chicken 

■ Hoi & Sour Pickles 

■ Egg Rolls 

• Fresh Fruil 



Soups: • 

• Hot and Sour Soup 

• Egg Drop Soup 



Entrees: 

• Combination Fried Rice 

• Combination Lo Mein 

• Twice Cooked Duck 

• Chicken Chop Suey 

• Shrimp & Vegetables 

• Garlic Chicken 

Lunch Specials Start at $3.75 

4 EAST PHILLIP RD., VERNON HtlLS 
GBO-1760 (On Rto. 60 - 3/4 Ml. W. or Milwaukee Ave.) 
Reservations Recommended • Open 7 Days 



• Saulccd Siring Beans 

* licefw/ Broccoli 

* Fried Zucchini 

■ Sweet & Sour Chicken 

• Hunan Fish 



ADVERTISEMENT 



SPOTLIGHT: 



Trattoria Pomigliano 



Location: 

602 N. Milwaukee 
Ave. in Libertyville 

Telephone: 

(847) 247-2208 

Hours: 

Tuesday through 
Thursday, from 1 1 a.m. 
to- 9 p.m., Friday and , 
Saturday, from 1 1 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. and for 
special parties on 
Sunday 

Menu: 

Old world Italian 
cuisine from an 
eggplant sandwich to 
Rack of Lamb Vesuvio, 
Zuppa de Pesce, Veal 
Marsala, Chicken 
Francese, spaghetti, 
lasagna, liriguini, etc. 




Old world Italian 
atmosphere, food 

•The Trattoria Pomigliano restaurant, located at 
602 N. Milwaukee Ave. in Libertyville, like its 
name, exudes an old world Italian atmosphere, 
while serving the finest old world Italian cuisine. 

A year ago Nick and Patty Saladino, Ann 
Ranico and Deanna Ranico got together and 



opened this family owned and operated eatery 
where customers can dine in the quaint and 
cozy aura of an Italian villa of yesteryear com- 
plete with checkered tablecloths and cream stuc- 
co walls that are adorned with paintings of 
scenes from Naples, Sicily, Capri and Rome, plus 
scenes from many Italian operas. 

Of course spaghetti and lasagna are on the 
hand painted menu which lists Chef Pino 
Campo's works of European art, spotlighting the 
bestTiramasu you have ever tasted. 

Rack of Lamb Vesuvio is a Friday and 
Saturday special. Zuppa de Pesce, a fish soup 
that contains clams, muscles, calamari, etc. all 
served over a tender linguini, is a favorite. 

The Veal Marsala, veal sauteed in a wine 
sauce, served with pasta on the side, and 
Chicken Francese," tender chicken sauteed in an 
egg batter, spiced with lemon and served in a 
wine sauce, are palate treats you won't be able 
to get enough of. 

The restaurant's hours are Tuesday through 
Thursday for lunch and dinner, from 1 1 a.m. 
to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday, from 1 1 a.m. to 
1 p.m. Sunday is reserved for special parties. 
The restaurant seats 86 comfortably, call 
(847)247-2208 for more information. 
Reservations are accepted only for parties of - 
six or more. The restaurant has a non-smoking 
environment. 




get them £*t CyAKZl 

CZetetttate uout Utthdau At the ^aih and 

the Cake, is oh us.., 

I (tesnvnttons a necessity!) 

THE BARN OF BARRINGTON RESTAURANT 

847.381.8585 

1415 S BARRINGTON RD JUST NORTH OF DUNDEE RD) 




- Full Bar - 
CatavtgG Garry Out 

Available 

- LmdsG Dinner — 

Open Daity at U :00 am 



Country Italian At Its Best! 

Reservations Saratov Square, 

625-1500 Gurnee 

A Nan Smoking Environment (Qmtr {/MftiaukeeAte. 

DELIVERY SERVICE AVA1IABLE &mubmffon9.) 
CALL ELITE at (847) 263-3300 
PAISAN'S - Where Friends Will Be Friends ... Foretvrf 



For 4 Years... 

_„ JRIGSJ* CUISINL 

^jTjAll dishes' and drj^ 
''Blegdpi'aihtiiani&fe^^ 





lunch: ^bn^ru^n.^§i v 
; Dinner 7 Day$& Woekp^ v 



Got a Community Event? 

Let UkElANd Newspapers Publish It 

In TriE CoMMUNhy CaIencIar! 

CaLL ELISE RETZIIMGER 

AT (847) 225^8161 



TERRY'C 

I MEXICAN « 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

Voted # 1 
3rd Year in a Row! 

DAILY LUNCH 
& DINNER SPECIALS 



til 



!!** 



&S5 



*i? 



Msm 



SRTO 



Tny our new AddmoN: 

OSTRICH FAJITAS 

(The all new rage in healthy meat.) 

FRIDAY & SATURDAY! 

Iks* Entrees Are ReaIIj Deliciovsl 

• CkipoTLE RoASTEd Duck 

• ROASTEd PoRk 

• RoASTEd BeeF TENdERloiN 

• ChipoTlE New YoRk Strip Roast 

PRIVATE ROOM AVAILABLE! 

■ No SMokiNq Area • HANdicAppid Accessible 

mk\ TERRY'C 

MEXICAN W 



8s 



\1 '• i 



%m 



Recently. Sherman Kaptm 

ol WBBM Newsradio 78 

raviowod Torryls giving 

ihem on excollonl *K" 

rating. 16 out of 20, wrtch 
was announced on tno 
radio, September 9th. 






\t«:M«; ■ MEXICAN 
^&^ RESTAURANT & BAR 

729 N. SEYMOUR • MUINDELEIN, IL 

(IN THE HAWLEY COMMONS) CARRV-OUT 

566-9530 

FAX 566-9590 



HOURS: 

MONFRtll AM-10PM 

SATURDAY A PM - 10 PM • CLOSED SUNDAY 



v- li 




HOT SPOTS UkElANcl Newspapers Novemder 1, 1996 



I 



;S 2 



/ 



Eating and 
meeting in the 
Lakeland area 




Advertise in 

Lakeland 
Newspapers 7 

"Traditions 
'96" 

and 

"Holidays" 

Holiday 
Gift Guides. 

Call Jti 
223-8161 * 

for Rate 
Information. 1/ 



UNDER NEW 
OWNERSHIP 



Loon Lake 
Resort 

on Lambert Drive off of 

Grass Lake Rd. and Route 83 

- On Beautiful Loon Lake 

838-LOGN 

(5666) 




• Sandwiches 

• Ice Fishing 

• Boat Rentals 

• Camp Fires 

• Picnic Area Rental 
Calf for Details 



949-1550 

830 East Route 45 
Mundeleln, IL 60060 





884-3900 



1149 COIF Rd., West 
Hoffman Estates 





WHERE FRESHNESS IS A SPECIALTY 

$L tlnique 'Experience in Seafood Pining 

v^Iso an excellent selection of fine meat entrees 

Featuring: Early Bird Menu 

Live Entertainment - Tues. thru Sat. - Sunday thru Friday 

Through November. Music by Dave Major Gift Certificates Available 
Dally Specials Open Dally: 

Private Party Facilities Mon *^!!l!!™i 3 L" am 

Saturday, 4 pm 

Ample Parking Sunday, 2 pm 

All major credit cards accepted 




Waterfalls 

Banquet & Buffet Yi 

THURSDAY 

INTERNATIONAL BUFFET: $7.95 

FRIDAY 

SEAFOOD BUFFET: $7.95 

SATURDAY 

PBIHE RIB BUFFET: $12.95 

SUNDAY 

CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH: $8.95 

Special Prices for Children 

TISW-Rtc. 173 

Antloch 

(847) 395-2212 

Coll for Reservations 





Join us for 
Grandma Anna's daily specials 

Traditional 

OLD WORLD 

ITALIAN MEALS 

602 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Iibertyville, II 60048 

(847) 247-2208 

Tues.-Thurs. 11-9; Fri.-Sat. 11-10 



Lei sure. Point 

Res tail ran t &t- Loiiivge 



Halloween Costume 
Party 

Nov. 2 - 9:00 p.m. 



U 



Drink 
Specials 



Stars 
Ka 



StBars 
raoke 



CASH 

for best costume! 



FOOTBALL SPECIALS 

FREE Hatftime Buffet 

SI .00 Domestic Drafts • $1.50 Domestic Bottles 

New Fall Dining Hours: 

Mon.-Thurs. Lunch: 12-2 Mon. -Thurs. Dirtrwr: 5-10 
Fri. ■ Sat. • Sun. Sirring All Day 

200 N. Forest, Fox Lake 

973-0235 

10% Senior Discount per tnttee Sun. - lima 



NIGHTLY SPECIALS - 

Alaskan King Crab Legs, 1 lb. - $15.95 

Shrimp Specials - $10.95 

Your Choice: Shrimp Alfredo, Shrimp 

Scampi, Shrimp Diavalo, or Beer Battered Shrimp. 

THANKSGIVING BUFFET 

From 11:30 am - 8:00 pm 

$ 11 95 Adults, $ 5 95 Kids 
Regular Menu Also A vailable 

(847)526-6905 

- Overlooking Beautiful Bangs Lake - 




313 E. LIBERTY 
WAUCONDA 



"In!'* 



TRIPLE J 




STEAK HO USE 






Located On Rt. B3 1/2 Mile North Of Anlloch 

414-862-9886 

Open Dally At 4 P.M. - Closed Tuesday 
Book Your Private Parties Or Business Lunch Up To 100 Nowl 

MONDAY: Chicken & Ribs All You Can Eat '....$8.95 

THURSDAY: Pasta Bar All You Can Eat $8.29 

(3 Different Saucas, Sauteed With Oman Chicken, Shrimp, Italian Sausage, Clams i Fresh Veggies) ; 

FRIDAY: Haddock Fish Fry All You Can Eat $7.95 

Early Bird Special 4 -6 $5.95 

Coming Soon: Sunday Brunch & Prime Rib Buffet 



CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF™ PRIME RIB SATURDAY 

Homemade Bread, Soup And Salad Dressings 
i^e Have The Ever Popular .;. 
ONION BLOOM'l-Alao- 1 Utl Lobster Tall •'>'; 



- - - rt7\* - ZSSjM 



:z?OT 



"I cook with beer. Sometimes 
I even put it in the Food!" 

Steve, Chef 

Experience fresh brewed beer and great steaks, 
ribs and seafood at the Midwest's First Brewpnb, 

Brewmasters 
Restaurant & Pub 

Wliere even the Beer is Homemade. 



4017 80th St. Kenosha, Wisconsin 414-694-9050 
1170-22nd Ave. (Parkside) 414-552-2805 



^^* i^f* ^^^ ^g^ ^^ ^^^ ^r^ <^r W^ ^^^ ^tr ^er ^r ^^^ '^r V^ ^^^ %r ^tr ^r^ %fi ^tr ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 



•r* 

w*- Located on Rte. 12 at Case Rd., /PJ7\ v1Q7 lOQfV 

jt'2 mi. South of 120, 2 mi. North of 176 [0^1 f WhLJjy} 



Hickory Knoll Cafe 8 Pub 

Located at The Golf Farm in Wauconda 
LADIES DAY: Friday $1 .00 Drinks 

A bonafide musical mecca of jazz, blues, standards, pop, 
improv, and great funky, tunes performed by our 

professional musical ensemble. Featuring: 
T.S. Henry Webb - Brass & Keyboard; 

T. Will Fejer - Keyboard Arranger; 

and a host of other wide-ranging talents. Join us for 

: cocktails or dinner, and listen to the 

'Best Live Music in Lake County' with NO COVER! 







%*" V* W* V* W* W* ** W* V* V* V* V* «* V* V* V* ** V* W* V* V* V* V* ** w* v* w* %* v* 

fififpii ^Zfumksgiolng tfollk Us 




Thanksgiving Buffet 

11:00-9:00 

Call for Reservations 
Adults: $10.95; Children 4-9: $5.95 




Call for Holiday Parties 

Banquets & Catering 
Gift Certificates • Carry-Out 

217 N. Front St. 
I mile South of! 20 on 3 J. McHenry 

w 



^*jm POU! 



£m*$**w,Vv*v» 



POUSH-AMERICAN BUFFET 

(8 IS) 344-0330 




| FREE ECCROLL Mi 



Valid Sunday thru Thursday , *ty^ 

Dim In Only • Exp, 11-30-96 



With Any Dinner Entree 

Valid Sunday thru Thursday 
Dine In Only • Exp, 11-30-96 , ±±+* 

OPEN 7DAVSA WEEKK)R lAJNOl^DINNa'; $£ 




-:-' 
M 



I 

I 



P 






^■' 



1333 Delany Rd. 



GURNEE 



. 



_ f *L_ -^_^ ■ ■• -* — 




NovEMbtR 1, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers LAKE LIFE 



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1 




2 


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4 


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6 




7 




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11 


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14 










15 












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17 












18 








19 












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21 




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23 




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25 




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26 




27 










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28 














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Clues ACROSS 
1. Paragons 

4. Plows ground 

9. Preliminary stage 

10. Most conceited 

1 1 . Has legal right to vote 

14. Father, (Spanish) 

15. Baglike structure 

16. Sidelined 
21. Wash 

23. Condiment 

25. Hero 

26. Goddess of the hunt 

28. Glittering foil strip 

29. Peaceful 
Clues down 

1. Jet blacks * 

2. Denotes study or prac- 
tice, suffix 

3. Inexplicit 

5. Three, Roman num; 

6. Avarice 

7. A cotton fabric with a 
smooth finish 

8. Continuing indefinitely 

12. -tzu, Chinese phil. 

13. Money of European 
Common Market 



14. Hit lightly 

17. Owed, as a debt 

18. US, Latin America, 
Canada belong to it 

19. Body cavity 

20. Grooming aid 

22. Ryan, strikeout 

artist 
24. Shield 
27. Brew 




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Aries - March 21/Aprll 20 

Think before you speak, Aries. Before you have to pry 

your foot out of your mouth, keep in mind who you're 

talking to and what you're talking about. A lesson 

learned too late could put you in a sticky situation on 

Thursday. Romance highlights the weekend. Scorpio is 

involved. 

Taurus - April 21/May 21 

Simple pleasures give you the greatest joy this week. 
Time spent with family puts you in the right frame of 
mind. News of a breakup may come suddenly but it 
won't surprise you. Leo is involved. Change In the work- 
place means new opportunity for you. Watch your tem- 
per on Friday. 

Gemini - May 22/June 21 
A Leo's decision will have a positive impact on your 
week. A small — but significant — part of your life will 
become much easier. Virgo's ideas provide food for 
thought. This weekend, cancelled plans leave you with 
free time to do whatever you please. Enjoy! Good news 
comes Thursday. 

Cancer - June 22/July 22 

A difficult choice hits you like a ton of bricks on 

Tuesday. Whether you spend seconds or days deciding, 

you'll come to the same conclusion If you follow your 

heart. A second meeting with Aries will change a bad 

first impression. Perhaps you misjudged the enigmatic 

Ram. 

Leo - July 23/August 23 

A strange coincidence early In the week will renew your 
belief in fate. Been feeling down In the dumps lately? It 
may be time for a change of scene. A weekend getaway 
should charge your batteries. Gemini keeps you on your 
toes towards the week's end. Patience will be required. 

Virgo - Aug 24/Sept 22 

A sense of humor will come in handy early in the week. 
Your quick wit will be welcomed. Unexpected red tape 
will complicate a simple project. A romantic relationship 
needs some nurturing, Make the effort to do something 
special. Leo and Libra add fun to the weekend. 

Libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 

An opportunity for advancement will seem to come out 




of nowhere. Before 
you decide to make a 
change, take a look 
at your long-term 
goals. Use your 
insight to better 
understand a friend's 
behavior, You'll see 
that everything is not 
as it seems on the 
surface. Family get- 
togethers highlight the weekend. 

Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 

An unfair situation will be the topic of discussion this 
week. Don't be afraid to voice your opinion or even offer 
a solution. You could make a difference. A restless 
mood could Interfere with your productivity at work later 
In the week. You may as well give in and take a break. 

Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
Setting unrealistic goals will only lead to disappointment. 
Be fair to yourself by going for what's reachable. A new 
friend could be the source of Inspiration for a creative 
■ endeavor. Be patient with difficult.family members — 
especially Aries. New romance looks promising. 

Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 

It's time to step in and involve yourself with a problem at 
work. Take a stand and let others know your feelings. A 
strange dream early in the week may provide clues Into 
something that's been troubling you. Meditation helps 
you focus. Artistic endeavors run with success. 

Aquarius- Jan 21 /Feb 18 

An ongoing battle with a family member could be Ironed 
out with some patience and understanding. Keep an 
open mind. If you've been putting off an important pro- 
ject, now's the time to dive in. You may find that it's not 
as hard as you thought it would be. 

Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 

Creative thinking helps you figure out a way to stream- 
line your workflow. Don't be afraid to share your ideas 
with higher-ups. You may. have to bid farewell to some- 
one close to you. A bittersweet exit will put you in a 
melancholy mood. Positive thinking lifts your spirits. 




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Internet surfer, you'll be treated with care 
by Lakeland netDIRECT's team of service 
specialists. Our goal is to provide Internet 
access that's fast, friendly, and reasonably 

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OIH 



«Sffi*«S«Wi^^ssa«WswaW3»:-^^:;-; «>■; : ::?:■: .?. . :■: :3K . xcxs&zf;: :Wk -si 



(847) 223-8199 



• Local Phone Call For 30 Prefixes • Unlimited Use 

• E-Mail • Flat Fee of $25 • Chat Groups 
• News Groups • Supports 28.8 Modems 
World Wide Web Access • Discount Rates Available 

• Personal Web Pages Posted Free . • Much More!!! 

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service@lnd.com 

Visit us on the Internet: http://www.lnd.com 



I 






f 



1 

i 


t 



BRSj no:-, j_y\i <\ ^?vi 

i'FALL HOME "UkdANd Newspapers 



NovemBer 1, 1996 



'liM'Ul 



TORO 



,=, TIL APRIL 1997 

NOTHING THROWS SNOW LIKE THIS! 



MSRP' 

S 429 M 

NOW 



INTRODUCING THE I - 
TORO® CCR 
POWERLITE." 



• Throws snow 25 foot 

• Weights only 36 lbs. 

• Powerful 3.0 hp onglno 

• Electric start model available 



> Unlquo Drum Auger 
assures a smooth 
flow ol snow 

■ 5.0 hp onglne 
• 21* clearing widih 

> Throws snow up lo 
25 feet 

Includes 

FREE 
EJoctrlc 

Starter 
•154" 
Vnluo 



MSRP 

$ 1093 M 

NOW 

|OB 






38052 



-*<^«<-, 



38170 



Toro 

521 Snowlhrowor 



•For qualified buyers on Toro's Revolving Charge Plan. Price subject to local daalor option.t Soo dealer far dolails on this Rmhod warranty. 




/ {nLakelandjJJ 

1 iNcwspapcra 



Take extra steps in building 
dream home on wooded lot 



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It seems straightforward enough: Buy a 
wooded lot, build a house on it and live hap- 
pily ever after surrounded by trees. 
Unfortunately, it's not that simple. To maxi- 
mize the chances that the trees you want to 
save will provide years of natural beauty and 
shade for your home, you need to take some 
extra steps in the home-building process. 

"It all begins with selecting your lot," says 
Scott Sutherland, district manager of the Lake 
Bluff office of Hendricksen the Care of Trees. 
"To make the most of your investment in a 
wooded property, you need to choose the site 
carefully. And the best way to do that is to 
have someone knowledgeable about trees 
look at the land before you buy it" 

Sutherland explains that a certified 
arborist can determine whether the trees on 
a site can or should be saved, as well as how 
extensive the tree-preservation measures will 
need to be. Factors such as tree species, age, 
condition, location and soil composition, all 
figure into the assessment 

Some trees, sugar maples and white oaks 
for example, are particularly sensitive to root 
disturbance. Soil compaction from excava- 
tion equipment, addition or removal of top-, 
soil, and other activities associated with 
building a new home can weak havoc on 
their ultrasensitive root systems — and can 
thus seriously threaten the trees' chances of 
survival. It doesn't take much to disturb tree 
roots, considering they are concentrated in 
the top 12 to 18 inches of soil and extend far- 
ther from the trunk than the branches do. 

What's more, older trees tend to be more 
sensitive to construction activities than 



young ones. 



Although the tendency among those 
unfamiliar with tree physiology is to assume 
the best course of action is to sacrifice young 
trees for the older specimens, the opposite is 
often true. Young trees are usually heartier 
and better able to withstand the stress of con- 
struction. 

After site selection comes the planning, 
which according to Sutherland, should also 
involve an arborist if preserving trees is the 
goal, "I've driven past new homes that are sit- 
uated way too closely to mature trees. Sure 
the trees are standing now. But the chances 
are good there was construction damage that 
might not be visible now but will manifest 
itself in a year or so. Will the tree still be 
standing 10 years from now? Not likely. 

An arborist should be on-hand to work 
with the architect to site your home and with 
the engineers to develop a tree-sensitive utili- 
ties plan. Often a slight re-orientation can 
mean' the difference between saving or 
removing trees. 

Before excavation begins, the arborist will 
take steps to protect the trees on site. He will 
fertilize and mulch the trees, prune the 
branches and roots (root-pruning protects 
roots from being torn by excavation equip- 
ment) install snow fencing around the most 
vulnerable trees, and whenever possible help 
educate contractors about trees' sensitive 
root zones, 

Once you have your home in the woods, 
don't forget to take care of your trees. They 
need TLC to recover from the stresses caused 
by construction. Be sure they receive ongoing 
proper maintenance: water, fertilizer, mulch 
and pruning. - 



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NovEMbER 1, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers FALL HOME f 




\» 



Tomatoes in November? 



The frost may be on the pumpkins, but it heat Skim foam, if necessary. Ladle hot jelly 
[ doesn't mean the end of your tomatoes. With into hot, sterilized jars, leaving 1 /4-inch 
very little effort, you can preserve the flavor to headspace. Adjust two-piece caps. 



enjoy year-round. 

Save the greenest tomatoes for several 
weeks by leaving them on the vine. Pull up 
the plants, tomatoes and all, and hang them 
upside down inside a paper bag. The garage 
is an ideal place to store green tomatoes. At 
temperature under 55 degrees, they'll stay 
green without spoiling. With your tomatoes 
safely stored away, you'll have time to imag- 
ine new ways to use all colors and varieties.- 
One of the freshest ideas is Tomato Jelly, a 
delicious dinner table 
accompaniment. 
Spread it on piping hot 
dill bread or use a 
whole jar to glaze a* 
smoked ham. 

Honeyed-Yellow 
Tomato Butter takes 
your garden fare in a 
mellower, sweeter 
direction. The recipe is 
easy to prepare and 

preserve, and the results will give healthy 
snacks and lunches instant appeal. Use a 




Process 5 minutes in a boiling- water can- 
ner. Yield about four 8-ounce jars. 

* 

Honey- Yellow Tomato Butter 

5 lbs. yellow tomatoes (about 15 
medium) 

2 cups sugar 

1 cup honey 

1 l-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled 

1 Tbl . whole allspice 

2 sticks cinnamon 

To prepare pulp: 

Wash and quarter toma- 
toes. Cook tomatoes in a 
large saucepot until soft. 
Press through a sieve or 
food mill. Measure 8 
cups tomato pulp. 

To prepare but- 
ter: Combine tomato 
pulp, sugar and honey 
in a large saucepot Tie 



_J ginger and spices in a 



spice bag. Add spice bag to tomato mixture 
Cook mixture. slowly until thick enough to 

tablespoonful or two with a scoop of cottage round up on a spoon. As mixture thickens, 

cheese for a tasty low-calorie meal. Or, simply stir frequently to prevent sticking, 

spread some on a slice of sourdough bread 

for a bedtime snack. 

Paired with your favorite red tomato 

sauce, home canned jars of Pickled Green 

Tomatoes make an imaginative holiday gift. 

Add a package of gourmet pasta, sesame 

crackers, almond biscotti and a packet of fla- 
vored coffee. Put it all in an attractive basket, 

and you've given a culinary event! 



Tomato jelly 
• 3 lbs. tomatoes (about 9 medium) 

» Tbl. crystallized singer 

1 (1 3/4 ounce) package powdered 
pectin 

1/2 tsp. salt 

2 This, lemon juice 

1/2 tsp. hot pepper sauce 

4 cups sugar 

To prepare juice: Wash and quarter toma- 
toes. Simmer tomatoes in a medium sauce- 
pot until they are soft and lost their shape. 
Strain tomatoes through a damp jelly bag or 
several layers of cheesecloth. Measure 2 cups 
tomato juice in a medium saucepot. 

Prepare home canning jars and lids 
according to manufacture's instructions. Jars 
should be covered with water and boiled for 
10 minutes to sterilize. 

To prepare jelly: Tie ginger in a spice bag; 
add spice bag to tomato juice. Stir in pectin, 
salt, lemon juice and hot pepper sauce. Bring 
mixture Jo a boil over medium-high heat, 
stirring occasionally. Add sugar, stirring until 
dissolved. Return to a rolling boil. Boil hard 1 
minute, stirring constantly. Remove from 



Prepare home canning jars and lids 
according to manufacturer's instructions. 
Ladle hot butter into hot jars, leaving 1/4- 
inch headspace. Adjust two-piece cap 
Process 10 minutes in a boiling- water canner. 
Yield about three 8-ounce jars. 

Pickled Green Tomatoes 

6 lbs. green tomatoes (about 18 
medium) 

1 pound pickling onions 

1/4 cup canning salt 

5 cups vinegar, 5 percent acidity 

4 cups water 

1 tsp. peppercorns 

1 tsp. whole allspice 

1 tsp. whole cloves 

2 sticks cinnamon, broken 
1/2 tsp. mustard seed 

1 12 tsp. celery seed 

Prepare home canning jars and lids 
according to manufacturer's instructions. 

Wash and core tomatoes; cut into quar- 
ters. Peel onions. Combine salt, vinegar and 
water in a large saucepot. Tie spices in a spice 
bag; add spice bag to vinegar mixture. Bring 
to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 10 min- 
utes. Add tomatoes and onions to vinegar 
mixture; simmer 10 minutes. Remove spice • 
bag. Pack hot tomatoes and onions into hot 
jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Ladle hot 
pickling liquid over tomatoes, leaving 1/4- 
inch headspace. Remove air bubbles with a 
non-metallic utensil. Adjust two-piece caps. 

Process 15 minutes in a boiling-water 
canner. Yield about 7 pints. 



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Assorted Spireas ^O^S 00 *12°° 

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1000 3 Gal. Dense Yews ....'M 85 *7°° 

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* * 




Invites you to join us in our 






Hardware 



^%l THE CLOWNS ?m 
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— SATURDAY, NOV. 2 10 DM i 

H=SIJNDAY, NOV. 3 W 9 n»L^ 



AT OUR ROUND LAKE BEACH 

ACE HARDWARE LOCATED 
ON ROUTE 83 & ROLLINS ROAD 







_J^ ENTER TO WIN = 
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f Grand Prizes Include: ^ 
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Special Events Will Be At Our Newly Remodeled Store 
At Route S3 & Rollins Road In Round lake Beach 



Sale Prices In Effect At All Of Our 6 Locations. 



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2-pjy white, larger 
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Windshield Washer Solvent 

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fctSi J u-.dv.itM &'^w<w'A : 'o&tihd ajWOH-XTAi-M; 







Nov«ibER 1, 1996 UkeUwd Newspapers HEALTH WATCH 




■w,:^^*;* 1 ^*****^?^^^^ 



Midwtsif.uN Rf-.qioNAi 



-<SireCard.> : 

;A wallet-size card which 
contains your medical history, . 
and other important infprrna- 
tion on microfilm can speak: \ v 
for you when you may be 
unable to, during a medical 
emergency. 

The Care Gard.a'free com- 
munity service of Midwestern ; 
.. Regional Medical Genten 2501r 
Emmaus Ave., Zion, enables <- 
emergen^ personnel to learn ; 
about your medical history 
and expedite rreamierit dur- 
■ing a medical emergency like 
a heart attack, accident, sud- 
den illness or allergic reaction. 

; The care card is CTeated' 
using medical Information 
provided by the card holder. A 
personal rnedical history form 
is photographed on nticrofilm 
and inserted into a credit 
card -sized, document person- '■■". 
alized Jwi th your name, 
address, telephone number, 
personal physician and oilier ,. 
impoi^t information. The 
card is appropriate for chil- 
dren and adults and can be 
used by any hospital which 
has; arnicrofilm reader. 

Care card holders also 
receive stickers to display in 
car windows ana* at home to 
alert personnel that you carry 
the care card. 

; For an application for a 
free Care Card by mail and for , 
I more informatioh,' call 731- W / 
% 4109.;' ■:^r-:-:^, -\tt: ■ 



Viciouy MnivibRiAl 
HospiiAl 






Diabetes screening ■;;-. 

: . Diabetes screenings will 

locations during the week of ; 
Nov. 4 through 8: Grayslake at 
the VictbryHe^tricajeCferiter* 
call 549-3112/ffiMdenhurst 
at Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center, call 356-5900 and 
in Vvaiikegan at Victory 
Memorial Hospital, call 360- 
4161. • -; 



Professional seminar 

V Robert Kearney, PhD, 
author of ^thin the Wall of 
Denial: Conquering Addictive ■■ 
Behavior and Transition 
Therapy*. An Existential 
Approach to Facilitating 
Growth in the Light of Loss," 
will share his approach to 
working with addictive, com-. ( 
pulsive ancl impulse control 
disorders on No Vi 8 at Victory w/; 
Memorial Hospital. ' _ 
Psychologists, social workers, 
. addiction counselors, nurses 
and other therapists will bene- 
fit from the information and 
skill development provided by 
th^ program. 

■The cost is $45. To register 
call 360-4357. 



&. v. ■ 



Lake Forest 
HospiiAl 



R.T.S. bereavement 

Resolve Through Sharing 
Bereavement Services sup- 
ports parents who have lost 
a baby through miscarriage, 
ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth 
or newborn death. This;' 
group meets oh the third 
Tuesday of each month at 7 
p.m. in the Westmoreland 
'Nursing Center, Call 234- 
6161 for further details. 

Cancer support group 

Meets the fourth 
Wednesday, of each month . 
at 7 p.m. in the Outpatient '. 
Oncology Waiting Room/ .' 
Call 234-5600, ext. 6445: ' ' 



Putting the 'service' in our service economy 



JOANNE M. ROUNDS 

For years now, the media have been telling 
us that our nation's economy has moved from 
a manufacturing economy to a service econo- 
my. Tens of thousands of manufacturing jobs 
are being lost to foreign producers or more 
efficient production methods. But hundreds 
of thousands of new jobs are being created in 
service sectors, such as finance, computers, 
accounting and retailing. 

You wonder. Particularly when you're 
searching futility for a clerk in a department 
store, or when your bank charges you extra to 
see a live teller. 

Since I joined Blue Cross, I've worked in 
our largest division — Subscriber Services. It's 
the largest one in the company because its 
main job is servicing claims, the real job of 
any insurer. 

As the company grew, the volume of. 
claims grew with it. There was a danger that a 



larger company would become more remote 
from its customers. We headed this problem 
off by setting up what we call full service units, 
each of them a small group of Blue Cross 
employees dedicated to handling questions 
and problems for employees of a single large 
company or a group of smaller ones. Dealing 
with the same person is a real comfort when ' 
you're suffering from the anxiety of an illness 
or injury. 

We also have tried to minimize problems 
and questions by linking our computer sys- 
tem to hospitals, doctors' offices and other 
health care facilities. Ideally, we'd like to have 
the health care claim settled electronically by 
the time the patient walks out of the treat- 
ment facility. 

The sheer volume of claims we process 
each day— currently about 100 million for our 
private and Medicare business— demands 
that we do as much of the work as we can elec- 



tronically, but, as a company, we can't lose 
the human touch. 

Technology can only do so much. 
Electronic claims procession can sometimes • 
run into problems as a result of faulty data 
entry or some other glitch. When you have a 
health problem, glitches are about the last 
thing you need. You need someone to turn to 
so your problem can be straightened out 
quickly and correctly. 

That's why our customer service represen- 
tatives receive continuos training to sharpen 
their people skills and develop that necessary 
caring attitude and the determination to cut 
through any red tape that may be involved. 

The service economy is nothing new to 
Blue Cross in Illinois. We've been, part of it 
since we started, over 60 years ago. 

Editor's note: Joanne Rounds is senior vice 
president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 
Illinois. 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Ketogenic diet offers new hope to children with epilepsy 



Watching 3-year-old Max 
Nowosel playing in his club house 
in his backyard, no one would sus- 
pect that just a year ago he was hav- 
ing as many an 100 epileptic 
seizures a.day, sometimes requiring 
him to wear a helmet 

Max has a seizure disorder 
called "absence seizure," one of 
many forms of epilepsy which leads 
to brief periods of blank staring and 



in which the child is unaware of his 
surroundings and unable to 
respond. At the tender age of 8 
months, Max began to experience 
convulsions and seizures, a routine 
that occurred so many times a day 
his parents, Julie and Len Nowosel 
found it hard to keep track. In 
search of answers and a cure for 
their child, the Nowosels took Max 
to see Dr. Michael Chez, Lake 



Medical personnel urged 
to attend aasualt seminar 

The most important aspects of investigating and prosecuting a 
sexual assault case is evidence collection. That's why LaCASA and 
The Lake County Emergency Room Directors Focus Group are 
inviting all area medical personnel to attend a free seminar on sexu- 
al assault evidence collection. 

"Without proper training and procedural guidelines, the gather- 
ing of both physical evidence and testimonials from a sexual assault 
survivor can be traumatic and counter-productive," said Lynn 
Nash, LaCASA's. Coordinator of Advocacy Services. 

Scheduled for Nov. 14, from 8 am. to noon, the seminar is open 
to emergency room doctors and nurses, private physicians, hospital 
social workers, medical students, and other medical personnel. It 
will be held in Lake Forest Hospital's Conference Room B. 

Instructors Lynn Nash of LaCASA and Joanna Olson of The 
Illinois State Police Forensic Science Center in Chicago, will discuss 
a range or related topics. 

For information or to register to attend, call LaCASA's Lynn 
Nash at 244-1187 by Nov. 7. 



Forest Hospital pediatric neurolo- 
gist and epileptologist. 

After months of trying several 
different anti-seizure medications, 
which proved ineffective in treating 
the seizures, Dr. Chez placed Max 
on a closely monitored ketogenic 
diet Originally developed at John 
Hopkins Medical Center, a leading 
authority in the development and 
use of the diet and where Dr. Chez 
served his residency, the therapeu- 
tic diet consists of a high fat/low 
carbohydrate and protein regimen 
used for the treatment of epilepsy 
where medications don't work. 

The diet has a 70 percent suc- 
cess rate for improving and control- 
ling epileptic seizures. 

"The diet is based on ketosis, a 
change in the body's metabolic 
state in which the body primarily 
bums fat, not sugar, for energy," 
said Chez. "We've estimated that 
the diet will completely control 
epilepsy in approximately half the 
children whose symptoms cannot 
be controlled by anti-seizure med- 
ications. 

In the other half of the children, 
the diet will either decrease the fre- 
quency of seizures or enable med- 
ications to be reduced. Twenty to 
30 percent of children simply do 
not respond to the diet." 

Dr. Chez has been instrumental 



in implementing and using the 
ketogenic diet within Lake Forest 
Hospital. In fact, Lake Forest hospi- 
tal is the only medical facility with- 
in Lake County using this diet in * 
epileptic treatment, and is the only 
one among two medical institu- 
tions in the Midwest trained in the 
John Hopkins method of treatment 
and referral. It is also the only hos- 
pital in Lake County .providing 24- 
hour EEG monitoring for epilepsy 
patients and others in its sleep lab. 
. Lake Forest Hospital registered 
dietitian, Edye Wagner, R.D., 
worked closely with Dr. Chez in 
establishing the program at Lake 
Forest Hospital and assists parents 
with the implementation. 

"The ketogenic diet is strict in 
thatitlimits the variety of foods that 
can be. consumed," said Wagner. 
"In addition, the diet's prescribed 
quantities (in grams) and combina- 
tion of food to meet the caloric 
requirements must be followed 
exactly." 

Currently, Dr. Chez has treated . 
over 25 children with the ketogenic 
diet, yielding a success rate of 85 
percent, benefiting in approved 
seizure control. For Max, the keto- 
genic diet has been successful. 

After a year, Max is seizure free 
and on the road to a life of a normal, 
healthy, developing toddler. 



Dermatologists to 
offer free skin 
cancer screenings 

Three area dermatologist; all 
members of the medical staff of 
Condell Medical Center, will pro- 
vide free skin cancer screenings at 
the medical center, 801 S. 
Milwaukee. The screenings will be 
held by appointment only in the 
Department of Radiology. To 
schedule an appointment, contact 
Nursing Services at 362-2905, ext. 
5120. 

Benjamin Dubin, MD, will do 
screenings from 9 to 11 a.m., 
Wednesday, Nov. 6. Mark Berk, 
MD, will offer screenings from 8 to 
10 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 7, and 
James Swan, MD, will provide 
screenings from 2 to 4 p.m., Friday, 
Nov. 8. 

The screenings are part of a 
national campaign to encourage 
early detection and teach preven- 
tion of skin cancer, the most com- 
mon form of cancer in this country. 
About one million new cases of skin 
. cancer will be diagnosed in the 
United States this year. . 




Following careers in health 

Tim Harrington, president, Victory Memorial Hospital (center left) nd Donald Wasson (center 
right) congratulate recipients of the Victory Memorial Hospital Donald Wasson Health Careers 
Scholarships. Award winners are (left) Kerry Price, respiratory care; Tamara Brown, nursing; 
Amy Shallue, nursing; Sonya Rhutasel, nursing; Stephanie Knable, and George Weyenberg, 
nursing. i 



J< -e ■.' 



...I. 




1 HEALTH WATCH UkEUwd Newspapers NovEMbER 1, 1996 



LaCASA announces board members 








The Lake 
County Cou- 
ncil Against 
Sexual Assault 
(LaCASA) has 
announced 
the election of 
its 1997 Board 
of Directors: 
President 
Susan Miller 
Susan Aldrich Aldrich, ' bro- 
ker/ owner for Aldrich Properties 
in Prairie View, owner of Design 
Innovations, and CEO for Adrian 
Aldrich and Sons Landscape 
Service, Inc. In addition to serv- 
ing as LaCASA's board president, 
Aldrich is extremely involved in 
other community service activi- 
ties. She currently serves on the 
Women's Board of NiCASA, vol- 
unteers for the Bottomless Closet 
in Waukegan, and is a member of 
AAUW and WINGS (Women 
Interested In Government). 

In addition, she served on the 
board of directors for the YWCA 
of Northeastern Illinois, and was 
Charter President of Business 
and Professional Women In Lake 
County. Aldrich received her 
Business Degree from DePaul 
Univ. She lives in Prairie View 
and has two sons Arlyn and 
Daryl. 

Vice President Mike Meyer, 
vice president of Employee 




Relations, 
Staffing and 
Diversity for 
Abbott 
Laboratories 
in Abbott 
Park. Along 
with serving 
on the execu- 
tive board, 
Meyer is 
chairperson Mike Meyer 
for LaCASA's 

Personnel Committee which 
advises on staffing policies and 
benefits. He is also past treasurer 
for the Lake County 
Transportation Management 
Assn. He lives in Wadsworth with 
his wife Mary, and their two chil- 
dren Amanda and Jeremy. 

Treasurer Merle Lynch 
recently retired after 40 years 
with Hewitt 
Associates, 
Lynch is now 
consulting on 
records man- 
a g e m e n t 
information 
systems for 
area compa- 
nies. Along 
with being 
Merle Lynch LaCASA's trea- 
surer, she is a member of the 
Capital Campaign committee. 
She is also past president of 




Wti'EVt I 'M-ftK. OLT) rWoMAlt... 




« 



I S9<ftLL CLIM<B < M.0119&AIH$ • 

And run barefoot through a meadow, and stroll on a white 
sand beach at sunset, and toss my giggling grandchildren 
into the air, and... 

Life is precious, isn't it? Your good health is also 
precious. At Victory Memorial Hospital, we want 
you to be happy and healthy for years to come. 
That's why we offer a new test to detect osteoporosis 
in its earliest stages, before it affects your quality of life. 
The test takes only 10 minutes, is painless and is covered 
by some insurance plans. A baseline test should be 
• performed anytime after the age of 40, similar to a 
mammogram. Future tests are compared by your 
doctor to recognize bone loss and develop a proactive 
treatment plan to help you follow your dreams. 

(D09£ 'T UBI- OSTEOPOROSIS 

££T you vowtoc 

To schedule an osteoporosis test, talk to your physician 
about a referral. For more information on the test 
and a list of risk factors, call Community Relations 
at 1 -800-THE-CHOICE (1 -800-843-2464). 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



the AIIM (Association of Imaging 
International) and CMA (Chicago 
Micrographics Assn.), and has 
been involved in Business and 
Professional Women in. Lake 
County for several years. Lynch 
resides in Lincolnshire and 
enjoys traveling with her hus- 
band Donald. . * 

Secretary Kim Washetas of 
Lake Villa is employed by 
Manpower in a variety of posi- 
tions since 1988, Washetas Is cur- 
rently the 
company's 
Information 
Resource 
Coordinator. 
While this will 
be Washetas* 
first term as 
an executive 
officer for 
LaCASA, she 
has been a 
board mem- 
ber since 1995, and an events vol- 
unteer for LaCASA for six years. 
She also currently serves as chair- 
person of LaCASA's Resource 
Development Committee over- 
seeing fundraising activity. 
Washetas has also been a United 
Way volunteer since 1988. 

LaCASA is the only organiza- 
tion providing Lake County resi- 
dents with comprehensive sup- 
port programs, including: 24- 
hour hotline, child assault pre- 
vention, community education, 
24-hour medical and police 
advocacy, and court advocacy. 
LaCASA's 24-hour hotline phone 
number Is 872-7799. 




Kim Washetas 




Your 





by Charlotte F. Nielsen O.D. 



"Soft" contact lenses were one of the greatest 
developments in the field of vision correction. They 
are so soft and pliable that they may be flexed 
between thumb and finger. These lenses have the 
capacity to absorb liquids so they remain moist and 
pliable when worn on the eye. 

• Soft lenses are more comfortable on the eye, and 
most wearers adapt to them quickly and easily. 
People engaged in strenuous sports or other activi- 
ties find that soft lenses stay In place better and dust, 
particles do . not get under them as readily. These 
lenses have been fitted to persons of all ages.... from 
three months to those over seventy years. 

To determine what correction your eyes require 
and which lenses would be best for you, start with an 
eye examination. Phone for an appointment. 



^\f s 




VISION CARE ASSOCIATES 



Or. C.F. Nielsen, Dr. W.B. Lyons, Dr.E.L. Friedman 
2403 Grand Ave., Waukegan 

847-662-3800 




Open enrollment - 

Make an informed decision about 
your health care. 

■ ■ 

Condell's Independent Physicians Association (IPA) offers: 



v 161 local physicians, 59 primary 
care and 1 17 specialists, all commit- 
ted to your family's total health and 
well-being 






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A network of comprehensive health 
care resources for you and your 
family throughout Lake County 

A variety of treatment programs 
close to home 



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v A growing list of affiliated health 
plans 

Choosing the right physician is a very 
important decision. Call for your 
complementary copy of A Guide to 
Choosing Your Physician and a free gift. 

Call now 
(847) 362-5033 




; €ondeilIE)V is aftiliated with these 
health; jplaiis: 

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> HcalthNetwork, Imv(PPO) 

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- United HealthCare Open^Vccess 



1324 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan, IL 60085 



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<8> Condell Independent Physicians Association 

801 S. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville, IL 






NoveMbtn 1, 1996 UksJANd Newspapers LAKELIFE j!|^ 



■i. iii < m 




Presents the 



The Best songs of the 
80s; 90s and Tocfaw 



Vacation, 



In all, there are six different Dream Vacation destinations. Here's how you 
can win one of these fabulous trips... 

• Listen to lake Comity's 10Z*3-XLC\ox all six vacations. 

• Fill out the entry form below. Be sure to include the vacation and it's 
corresponding number. 

• Be sure to circle the vacation you want to win. 
I Mail your entry to WUC Dream Vacation 3250 Belvidere Road, Waukegan, IL 

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• You must be 21 to enter. 



Dream Vacation #1 
Jamaica... 

Trip Includes: 

• Round trip airfare . 

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Trip includes ail meals, 
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• Trip V alue is $4,000 plus 
$1,000 in spending money from 

WXLC 




Dream Vacation #2 
Dominican Republic... 

Trio Includes ; 

Round trip airfare 
» 7 nights at the Caribbean 
milage Play a Grande Retort 

• Trip includes all meals and 
beverages 

• Trip Value is $2,500 plus 
$1,000 in spending money from 

WXLC! 



Dream Vacation #3 
Mexico... 

Trio Includes ; 

Round trip airfare. 

4 Nights at the Caribbean Milage 
Canton and 3 nights at the Caribbean 
Ptafocar CUt€Ui4 Beach dab 

Trip includes all meals and 
beverages 
• Trip value is $2,800 plus $1 ,000 

in spending money from ¥fXLCt 



Dream Vacation #4 I 



listen to WUC for 

details on 
Dream Vacation #4/ 



Dream Vacation #5 



Dream Vacation #6 



listen to WUC for 

details on 
Dream Vacation #5/ 






listen to WKLC for 

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Vacation: 

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Corresponding # ; 

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When you have all six vacations, circle the 
one you want and mail your entry to WXLC1 



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-" "'"•" ~^' iaaWl I— P— — 



HI 




JkfiJ LAKELIFE UkelANd Newspapers NovcMbeR 1, 1996 



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-.-■•v; ?\ ••- Aotbch. It. ROPO? ''"*■. Novc*Mbm1, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers COUNTY f, t y. 

This electorate carries 90 years of memories into voting booth 

SUZIE REED . nn^otr1i.mrTU n : i_. t- , , -. O-" 



Staff Reporter ~ 

Members of the Golden Circle Club at Hawthorn 
Lakes Retirement Community don't think a president's 
personal life has anything to do with" his effectiveness as 
chief executive.' 

The seniors, all 90-plus residents of the facility, 
shared memories of 17 presidents, and indicated their 
satisfaction with the current administration. 

"All womanizers are great presidents," said one man. 
"I don't give a damn what they do; I don't care what the 
president's personal life is." 

The statement was prompted by a question on what 
the seniors remembered about John F. Kennedy, who 
actually conducted his alleged relationships-while the 
media looked the other way and the public was none the 
wiser. 

With encouragement from public relations director 
Bev Kennedy, members of the Golden Circle reviewed 
presidents of the 20th century and the effects each had 




on their lives. Their memories began even before women Memories of Franklin Roosevelt brought com- 

We T P HH v W nn tOVOt ,!*' -a a r,u ' mentsonhis fondness for martinis and images of him 

Teddy Roosevelt provided a lively beginning to the with cigarette holder. The seniors recalled the Great 

llllrV Whfin ho Z>Cf*anAaA f*» _ 



century when he ascended to 
the presidency after the assas- 
sination of William McKinley 
in 1901; 

"I like what he said, 'Walk 
softly and carry a big stick,'" 
said Mary Dennstedt. "I have 
one of the original Teddy 
bears," she added. The toy 
became popular, said 
Kennedy, after the president 
was photographed with a baby bear. 

Another resident shared a memory of the 1912 cam- 
paign, when her father was one of few Democrats in a 
town of Republicans. He set his children to work passing 
out ads for an appearance by Woodrow Wilson. 

"It was muddy; I spoiled my new tan shoes," she recalled. 



'We don't look at the private lives 

of these people. They all have 

something to hide/ 

Gilbert Button, senior citizen, reflecting 
on the presendential election 



Depression and FDR's efforts to 
combat it when he became presi- 
dent in 1933. 

"He put a moratorium on 
banks," said one. "Everyone felt a 
sigh of relief; someone was doing 
something.". 

One woman recalled her 
father worked in the Civilian 
Conservation Corps. "It gave the 
men something to do," she said. 

"It gave them a lot of hope and made their families 

feel better." 

The public was largely unaware of FDR!s dependence 

on a wheelchair after a bout with polio in 1921. "A lot of 

people didn't know it," recalled one man. "I was sur- 

See MEMORIES page C2 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 






Time for a 
change 

Dole a better man, 
a better candidate 
PAGE C4 

Readers 
speak out 

Your words on the 

candidates 

PAGEC5 

A view from 
down under 

How Arkansans are 
feeling on election eve 
PAGEC6 




The art of tae 
kwon do 

Ancient art form has 
many benefits 
PAGE C7 




Bneral£lecitc 



Election guide 

A guide to the 
candidates on your 
Nov. 5 ballot 
PAGE CI 1 



family 



Lake County native's new home 
may be U.S. Senate floor 

RHONDA HETRICK BURKE , 

Editor in Chief 

When Lake Zurich native Al Salvi announced his candidacyfor die 
U.S. Senate last October, there were about a dozen people at his press 
conference. - 

There were no big name politicians on the state, federal or even 
local level that came out to lend their endorsement to the young 

Republican. Even Lake County • 



'It was over the course 

of many years of 
debate at the dinner 
table that he changed 
my mind (about being 
a Democrat). I believe 
his ideas are right for 
Illinois and America.' 

Al Salvi, Sr. 




Al Salvi with his son, Joseph, make a stop in Lake County during 
the last days of his campaign.— Photos by Linda Chapman 

"Al was a delight to raise," said Salvi, Sr. "All of my kids were, they 
were each very individual and had their own opinions." 

Al Jr.'s love of debate and his natural leadership skills stood out at 
an early age. He received the coveted American Legion Award for 
exhibiting leadership and scholarship traits in eighth grade. . 

Summers were spent playing Little League and swimming and 
boating on private Lake Zurich. The family home was across the 
street from the lake offering the family lake rights. 
See SALVI page C2 



GOP party big-wigs refused to sup 
port the "home town" idealist. 
When endorsements were 
announced late In the year, even 
the Lake County party snubbed 
Salvi, endorsing his opponent and 
the party-anointed candidate Lt. 
Gov. Bob Kustra in the primary 
race. 

But Salvi's enthusiasm did not 
wane. He was committed to the 
race. Some compared him to 
David as he went to face Goliath. 
His weapons were his message 
and his faith. 
He proved the message was powerful by stunning the state GOP 
leaders and defeating Kustra in the primary. 

Since March 19th, it has been a different ballgame. The once 
shunned Republican has united the party in Lake County and 
throughout Illinois as he does battle in a race that many political 
observers are calling one of the most closely watched in the nation. 

A year ago, Salvi's older brother, trial lawyer 
Patrick, was more widely known in Lake County than 
Al. This September, Al Salvi introduced GOP presiden- 
tial candidate Bob Dole at a rally in Grayslake and got 
a hug from Elizabeth. 

A year ago, Salvi's signs were often hard to find 
posted at Lake County intersections. Today, huge red 
and white "Salvi for Senate" signs can be seen from 
the cornfields of DeKalb County and on the lawns of 
citizens throughout Illinois. 

Whether or not Al Salvi wins election to the U.S. 
Senate, Nov. 5, Lake County residents will not likely 
soon forget the name of the man who dared to chal- 
lenge voter's minds and party leaders with his ideals 
and they will likely not soon forget that Al Salvi is one 
of them. 

Raised in Lake Zurich 

Al Salvi was born the fifth child to Albert Sr. and 
Marita Williams Salvi, April 25, 1960. He was bap- 
tized, as were all of his eight brothers and sisters.iby 
Father Joseph Firnbach al St. Francis de Sales Church 

in Lake Zurich. 

"At each one of my son's christenings, the father 
would sprinkle their right arms with holy water and 
say 'I hope he's a great right-handed pitcher,'" said Al 
Salvi, Sr., a lawyer. The blessing may not have affected 
their ability to pitch but it may have had some impact ^ 

on their future careers— four of the five sons are A „ graduales f rom Carmel High School, Kathy and Al Salvi and U.S. Senator Rick 

lawyers, the eldest, Thomas, is a physician specializing San(oruni/ R . Pa< f return to their alma mater to speak to the students. 

in internal medicine, r 




a 




COUNTY UkElANd Newspapers NovEMbER 1, T996 



Salvi 



From page CI 

"Our home was ideal for raising 
a large family," said Salvi, Sr. "We 
had five bedrooms, lake rights and 
a full basketball court in the back- 
yard. When you have a family that 
size you're social life consists of the 
family." 

It was at the family dinner table 
that Salvi learned his debating 
skills. 

"My wife and I were great 
believers that the entire family 
should sit down to dinner togeth- 
er," Salvi, Sr., said. "As the children 
grew older our conversation 
revolved around political events, 
sports and current events. It was 
lively and animated. It was then I 
knew for sure my children had a 
mind of their own." 

The Salvis had a rule that no 
one could leave the table until 
everyone's point of view was heard. 
No personal attacks were allowed. 

"Al was and still is a great 
debater," said his dad. "He was 
always the loudest." 

His father believes the dinner 
table training has served AI well 
during his two terms in the state 
house, and now perhaps in the U.S. 
Senate. 

"No one will ever be able to get 
him upset or to the point were he 
loses his cool," Salvi Sr. said. "He 
had the perfect training ground at 
the dinner table with his brothers 
and sisters." 

Salvi graduated from Carmel 
High School in 1978 where he was 
an active participant in the student 
council and a 95-pound wrestler. 

He returned to Carmel Oct. 25 
to visit with students and faculty. 

"The values I learned at Carmel 
have made me what I am today," he 
told the students. "Carmel is a great 
school and a great place to learn." 

He was accompanied, as he is 
most places, by his wife and fellow 
Carmel alumni, Kathy Keller Salvi, 
and his children. There are five — 
Katie, Nick, Joseph, Mary and 
David. 

"1 remember watching Kathy as 
Anna in the King and I, and think- 
ing 'she is so far out of my league, 
she'd never go out with me,' Salvi 
told the students. Kathy Keller 
graduated in 1977. 

The pair married 15 years later 
after getting reacquainted through 
law work. Both are practicing 
lawyers at the firm of Albert J. Salvi 
and associates in Waukegan. 

Impact of the race 

The large Salvi family has been 
a great source of energy and com- 
fort for Al Salvi and his wife during 
the year-long campaign. 

"Al said right from the begin- 
ning that he didn't want to go to 
work for Illinois families by leaving, 
his own family behind," said Kathy 
. Salvi. "We have lived very well 
together on the road. We have 
taken several trips in a rented 
motor home with all the kids. They 
have been read to and played with 



Memories 

From paged.. 

prised; a lot of people were." 

Memories of the president's 
death just before the war ended in 
1945 brought recollections from 
.those serving their country. One 
woman in Europe heard, the news 
from a British mission; another 
shared the reaction of her fellow USO 
workers. "We felt terrible," she said. 

Harry Truman prompted a spirit- 
ed testimonial: "He said what he 
thought and did what he wanted. He 
was a damn good president." 

the 30-some members of the 
Golden Circle will continue to reflect 
upon more than 90 years of presi- 
dential history as they prepare to cast 
their ballots Nov. 5. 



each stop along the way." 

For Kathy the campaign trail 
has also meant an adjustment to 
her mommy schedule. David was 
born in June and the infant has 
learned the campaign trail quickly 
along with the. other four Salvi 
youngsters. 

"Our parents have been a 
tremendous amount of help as all 
of our brothers and sisters," said 
Kathy. "This Has really been a big 
family effort." 

"It's been stressful for the whole 
family," said Salvi, Sr. "Al's winning 
the primary was a feeling of eupho- 
ria this family has never experi- 
enced before but we are not used to 
having our children be the subject 
of personal attack. That is hard for 
any parent." 

The thrust of Al from local 
politician to the national spotlight 
has been easily weathered by this 
family. 

"We have had such a tremen- 
dous amount of support from the 
people of Illinois' and the 
Republican Party/ said Kathy. 
"Since the primary the party has 
been united and people all around 



the country have gotten to know Al 
and his ideals. We have had just 
tremendous support for Al." 

The ease of Al's transition to the 
spotlighthas come as no surprise to 
his father. "He is very talented as 
are all my children,' his father said. 

Al Jr., is an effective enough 
debater to turn his father from the 
Democratic Party to the 
Republican. Al, Sr., ran for both 
State representative and Congress 
in the late 1960s. He was not elect- 
ed. 

"It was over the course of many 
years of debate at the dinner table 
that he changed my mind," said his 
father. "I believe his ideas are right 
for Illinois and America." 

It is that kind of campaigning 
that appears to have won many vot- 
ers to Salvi. 

"Al has been really well accept- 
ed by the people he has met," said 
Kathy. "His ideas reflect what 
mom and pops have been looking 
for in the person they elect He is 
very committed to doing his best 
for the families of Illinois. 
Everywhere we go, people say he is 
"a breath of fresh air.'" 




After speaking with a group of students from Carmel High School, 
Al Salvi stops to answer one of Joe Brysiewicz's questions. 




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V 




At A GIance— 

Police seek uninvited guests 

MUNDELEIN— Shots fired by a known gang mem- 
ber damaged only a house last weekend after two car- 
loads of troublemakers from 
Waukegan crashed a 
birthday party. The 
intruders initiated a 
fist fight that slight- 
ly injured one guest. 
"They started - 
throwing gang 
signs and were 
asked to leave by ■ 
the host," explained 
Mundelein Police 
commander Keith 
Kalodimos. "A fist fight broke 
out and one individual had a pis- 
tol." 

Mundeleinpolice are work- 
ing with their Waukegan counterparts and the Lake 
County Gang Task Force to locate the shooter. Police 
are "guarded optimistic" that an arrest is imminent. 
Several other Waukegan youths were charged with 
consumption of alcohol as minors and curfew viola- 
tions.— by SUZIE REED 

Osmond seeks supervisor role 

ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP— 

Township Trustee Timothy 
Osmond is hoping to become 
the next township supervisor. 
He announced that he will 
seek the office in the 1997 
election. Osmond has been a 
trustee for eight years and is 
the squad chief of the Antioch 
Rescue Squad. He has owned 
Osmond Insurance since 
1977. "The next four years will 
be important to Antioch 
Township due to the 
increased growth and development. We must be 
prepared for the year 2000 and the possible respon- 
sibilities that the federal and state government 
could require local government to handle," Osmond 
said, —by ALEC JUNGE 

Fundraiser set for racer 

GRAYSLAKE— Friends of 
injured race car driver Chad 
Borg will host a fundraising 
benefit Nov. 2 at the Olde 
Stratford Hall, 54 S. Seymour 
Ave., Grayslake from 8 p.m. - 
midnight. 

Borg, a professional late 
model race car driver, was 
injured in a near fatal crash at 
Kankakee Speedway, Aug. 11, 
1995. Borg will make his first 
public appearance since the 
accident. He will speak about 
his recovery from a severe 
brain injury one day at a time. 

On hand for the event will be USAC driver Tim Cox 
and Carl Dean, crew chief for Mario Andretti's 1992 
season. There will also be an auction and fundraiser. 
For more information call Jerry Harrison, 599-1606.— 
STAFF REPORT 

Annual auction coming 

WADSWORTH— St. Patrick's Church will hold its * 
annual "A Night to Treasure" auction Saturday, Nov. 9, 
beginning at 6 p.m. 



NovcMbiR 1 , 1 996 UkElANd Newspapers COUNTY 





Osmond 




Borg 



The auction includes many wonderful donated 
items including sports and theater tickets, sports mem- 
orabilia, vacatfon packages and hand-crafted items 
from the school children. 

In addition to the auction there will be a 50/50 raf- 
fle; Only 100 tickets at $100 each will be sold. There will 
be five cash prizes with the top payout at $4,000. For 
more information on the raffle call E.J. Murray at 263- 
8276.— by ELIZABETH EAKEN 



-Quote of t^e weeIc 



n 



"There have to be those 
things that fill your pocketbooks, 
but equally there have to be 
those things that fill your heart, 
Simpson said alluding to the 
plan's creation. 



Dist. 118 asks for waiver 

WAUCONDA— Students in Wauconda Unit District 
118 may attend school next fall on Columbus Day, 
Martin Luther King Jr. 's Birthday and Casimir Pulaski 
Day. 

The school board is asking.the Illinois State Board 
of Education for a waiver to allow board members to 
decide if they want to have students attend school on 
any of those holidays in order to have more full weeks 
of class. 

The state board has 45 days to reply from the date 
of the waiver application. 

The board plans to recommend the 1997-1998 
school year calendar in January.— by SPENCER 
SCHEIN 

Villages seek whistle ban 

LAKE VILLA— Trustee James McDonald told the 
village board the communities along Metra's North 
Central Service line are seeking a whistle blowing ban 
during the late evening and early morning hours. All 
crossings have mechanlcal'gates. Wisconsin Central 
officials claim the train whistles are needed for liability 
reasons. In a few weeks Wisconsin Central officials will 
again address train whistles with the communities. — 
by ALEC JUNGE 

Gurnee Ok's salary hikes 

GURNEE— Pay rates for elected officials in Gurnee 

will be on the rise. 

Gurnee trustees approved a schedule of increases 
proposed by Mayor Richard Welton. The date is signifi- 
cant because any changes in pay must take place 180 
days before an election, this one in April. 

"If you are in office, you would not see the increas- 
es until the next term," Welton said. 

A survey was done by staff on compensation in 
Buffalo Grove, Grayslake, Highland Park, Libertyville, 
Lake Forest,' Mundelein, Waukegan, Vemon Hills, 
Gurnee and Lindenhurst. 

"We should not be the highest or lowest - we 
•should be what is fair and reasonable," trustee Mark 
Ratfelders said. 

As outlined by Gurnee administrator James 
Hayner, trustees would receive $3,600 a year; the vil- 
lage president $12,000 and the clerk, $3,000 a year. 

"This makes us comparable with other communi- 
ties," Gurnee Mayor Richard Welton said. 

The salary increases may have been a factor in 
leading Trustee Mark Ratfelders to announce he is not 



seeking re-election in 1999. 

"I cannot vote for a pay raise for myself. I hope to 
serve the people of Gumee and Lake County in some 
other capacity, but I will not seek re-election to the vil- 
lage board in 1999," he said. — by STEVE PETERSON 

New cupola tops off hall 

LIBERTYVILLE— Members of American Legion Post 
329 will welcome a hew addition to their renovated hall 
at 715 N. Milwaukee. On Nov. 5, workers are sched- 
uled to install a replica of the cupola that graced the 
building from 1894 to 1946. The project required 
extensive remodeling of the support structure to . 
comply with modern construction codes, said 
Libertyville trustee Dean Larson, who has spearhead- 
ed the effort. 

Larson is looking ahead to more improvements 
and is hopeful that more donations will be forthcom- 
ing. Plans include redoing the brick exterior and ren- 
ovations to the stage. "The exterior is higher visibility 
and a priority, but the stage would have extended 
function and use," he said. 

An open house planned for Nov. 16 will hopefully 
generate increased interest in the ongoing project. 
For information call him at 367-5857.— by SUZIE 
REED 



State University begins in Jan. 

LAKE BLUFF- Proposals have been received from 
five state universities to offer programs in Lake County 
beginning in January 1997. The five state institutions - 
submitting proposals are: Northeastern Illinois 
University, Southern Illinois University, Governors State 
University, The University of Illinois, and Northern 
Illinois University. The proposals were received as a 
result of a grant approved in September by the Illinois 
Boardof Higher Education. 

Rep. Thomas Lachner tR-Lake Bluff)' has worked on 
the proposal arid made the announcement., — STAFF 
REPORT 

Flint Creek Watershed gets help 

LAKE ZURICH — Improvements are Being made to 
improve the Flint Creek Watershed ^within the village. 

Lake Zurich will embark on the last of a three- 
parr project to end the grit and grime that run-ofT i 
into tributaries leading to Flint Creek by Installing 
oil/grit separator structures to two storm sewer out- ' 
lets to the lake. They would be installed at Old Rand 
Road and Route 12. 

Plans also call for a wetland filtration enhance- 
ment to the area near the old ComEd substation, at 
the end of Park Avenue, tributary to Mionske Pond. 

The work is being done to help collect some oil 
and grit that runs off Route 12, said Victor C. 
Ramirez, village engineer. 

"It will help water quality more than anything,", 
said David Talbott, director of public works. 

Work on the Flint Creek Watershed Improvement 
Project started last winter, when Lake Zurich Public 
Works employees cleared hundreds of old Box Elder 
and junk trees along the creek from Route 12 to 
Miller Road.— by SPENCER SCHEIN . 

Free Child I.D. program 

GRAYSLAKE— The Grayslake Police Department is 
going to be conducting a Child I.D. event hosted by the 
State Bank of the Lakes, 50 commerce Drive, Saturday 
Nov. 2 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the community room. 

The officers will provide a free set of fingerprints to 
parents to be used in the event of an emergency partic- 
ularly if a child is reported missing— by ELIZABETH 
EAKEN 



Unwanted guests shoot up party 

In die early morning hours of Oct. 26, Round. Lake police 
made several arrests after an all ntglit party, including pressing 

felony charges involving a gun. _ 

When officers approached a couple in the 1300 block of 
Pleasant Drive, one of tire individuals related, "He just shot at 

1 Upon questioning, a witness pointed out alleged offender, 
Michael Thompson, 21, who was later arrested. The victim 
explained Thompson pointed a gun at him after shooting it off 

twice in the air. , . , „ , 

Thompson of423Highmoor Dr., Round Lake Park was 

charged with reckless discharge of a firearm, aggravated assault, 
unlawful use of a weapon, mob action and possession of a 
firearm without a Firearm Owner Identification card. Gomez, a 
resident of 1526 Lakeshore Dr., Round Lake Beach was cited 
whh mob acfion, aggravated battery and battery. A third suspect 
is being sought in connection with the incident.- Staff report 



Crossover voting counters straight ticket 

.- . . . -• '* •_«.__«- ...ifU tha T a L- 



SPENCER SCHEIN 

Staff Reporter 

The common line among 
politicians is vote a straight party 
ticket, ensuring a vote for all can- 
didates from their party. 

. Many voters follow this line, 
even if they want to vote for a 
candidate from another party in a 
particular race. 

Some voters are unaware that 
they can do this, which in elec- 
tion terminology is known as a 
"crossover vote." 

Susan Ewalt, Lake County 
Elections administrator, explains: 
"If you do a straight party punch, 
and then vote for a candidate 



from the other party, then that is 
a crossover." 

Voting for a candidate from 
another party in a race cancels 
out the vote that would go to the 
other candidate from the straight 
party vote. 

"The only tiling one has to be 
careful of is to not 'over-vote,'" 
Ewalt said. 

This happens when a voter 
punches a straight party ticket, 
and then also punches for two 
other candidates in the same 
race, she said. 

Voters can also have a 
crossover vote for a write-in can- 
didate who had filed a declara- 



tion of intent with the Lake 
County Elections Board by 5 p.m. 
Tuesday, Oct. 29. 

Voters of Lake Villa Township 
have to be careful when casting 
their ballot, Ewalt said, as a straight 
vote for the District Party will only 
cast a vote for Joyce Frayer for Lake 
County Board, leaving votes for 
other offices blank. 

"That is sort of the unique sit- 
uation where a party is only In 
one district," she said. 

It is uncommon in General 
Elections, but more common in 
Consolidated Elections at the 
municipal and township level, 
she said. 



\ 



EDITORIAL UkelANd Newspapers NovEMbcn 1, 1996 





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Save nation from tarnished 




In the twilight days of the trou- 
bling 1996 presidential campaign, 
Bob Dole may have hit upon a 
theme that will level the playing 
field between him and Bill Clinton, 
the chameleon-like master politi- 
cian who holds such a strange fas- 
cination for so many Americans. 

We say "troubling" because Dole 
and his Republican agenda 
haven't been getting fair treat- 
ment from the elitist network and 
Beltway media types whose 
unabashed liberalism alarms fair- 
minded citizens. 

An angry Bob Dole has lashed out 
at a "liberal media" -that favors 
President Clinton, a media that 
has refused to take a hard-look at 
the chief executive's questionable 
policies, character imperfections 
and a litany of ethical breakdowns 
that have failed to dent the con- 
science of the electorate. 

In a spirit of Harry Truman's 
"give'm hell" excoriations of a "Do 
nothing Congress" that forged a 
come-from-behind victory for the 
feisty Missourian in 1948, Dole has 



implored voters to "rise up" 
against the nation's news organi- 
zations, which he says are protect- 
ing the Clinton Administration 
and have violated the public trust. 
: Speaking like a crusader, Dole 
implored people to stop the biased 
liberal media. "Don't read that 
stuff. Don't watch television! You 
make up your mind! Don't let 
them make up your mind for you! 
We are not going to let the media 
steal this election!" The country 
belongs to the people, not The 
New York Times, Dole asserted 
emotionally. 

We agree with leaders like 
Congressman Phil Crane who see 
a general breakdown of morals 
and values in America today. Is it 
not fair to lay part of the respon- 
sibility for restoring a national 
sense of truth and decency at the 
foot of the president? Our 
answer is a resounding "yes." If 
part of the president's responsi- 
bilities involve setting standards 
and serving as a role model for 
what is good and proper, then we 



Judges deserving 
of careful study 

Illinois is among a dwindling number of states that still 
seats the judiciary through an elective process. Thus a num- 
ber of judicial seats are on the Nov. 5 ballot. 

The way the ballot.is constructed selection of judges is at 
the tailend of Lake County's electronic voting book, just 
before referenda issues. We urge voters not to overlook judi- 
cial candidates! Be sure to give candidates for the bench 
careful consideration. 

After circuit court judges have won their seat through 
election, statutues provide for periodic non-partisan elec- 
tor review of their performance without party affiliation 
through a. procedure called judicial retention. This "year 
there are five full circuit court judges from the 19th Circuit 
covering Lake and McHcnry counties on the ballot seeking 
retention. 

We heartily endorse the retention of all five— Circuit 
Judges Bernard E. Drew jr., Fred A. Geiger, Charles F. Scott, 
Michaei J. Sullivan and Stephen E. Walter. They exemplify 
the 19th Circuit's historic high standards of honesty, integri- 
ty, productivity and efficiency. Judges must receive 60 per- 
cent of the vote cast for retainment. 

Two other permanent seats in the circuit created through 
expansion are to be filled. One such seat. is sought by Circuit 
Judge Jane Drew Waller, a Lake County resident, who has 
established a fine record of fairness, diligence and communi- 
ty service. She is running unopposed as a Republican. Judge 
Waller is well deserving of a vote of confidence. Republican 
Thomas A. Scherrnerhorn, currently an associate judge, and 
Democrat Richard H. Jackson are competing for the circuit's 
McHenry County seat. We prefer Scherrnerhorn for his 
experience and demonstrated ability. 



find President Clinton guilty of 
dereleclionofduty. 

Facing a struggling economy and 
the confusion of the third party 
Perot candidacy, enough voters 
bought into Clinton's representa- 
tion as a "New Democrat" to put 
him and his seamy Little Rock 
entourage into the White House in 



1992. What Clinton backers and 
the nation got was a scandal-rid 
administration led by a fmger-in- 
the wind politician relying on out- 
moded New Deal instincts who is 
willing to use any means to satisfy 
his lust for political power. Today, 
even a majority of the president's 
supporters view him as a leader 



who cannot be trusted. 

Contrast this with a Republican 
challenger whose' life has been .an 
open book, who has a record of 
achievement and honesty in the 
political arena, a leader noted as a 
genuine human worthy of admira- 
tion and trust even by his 
See TARNISHED page C5 ' 



EDITORIAL 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



-ViEwpoiiNT — 

Doubt hangs over 
chairman outlook 




BILL SCHROEDER 



Publisher 

Political junkies! Don't click your clicker. There's 
another piece of business to attend to after all the votes 
are counted Tuesday. 
■ '. It's county chairman picking tim-m-m-m-e! 

Arguably a bigger influence on your daily life than 
whoever occupies the White House, the occupant of 
the 10th floor of the Lake County Building directs traf- 
fic for 22 other disparate representatives, sets the agen- 
da for county government, dictates the pace of growth 
and development, decides when and how to spend a 
$250 million budget, hand picks key staff personnel 
and committees, appoints leaders of a number of local 
governmental units, dictates operating policies, dis- 
penses a flock of jobs, and is in a position to make big 
deals. Really big deals. 

If this sounds like a job description for outgoing 
County Board Chairman Robert "Bob" Depke it is, 
because that's the way "Bulldozer Bob" has run coun- 
ty government for six years, becoming the most power- 
ful county chairman in Lake County history. 
Any of Depke's successors in the wings, either friends 
or foes, pale by comparison. No one being mentioned 
now as chairman material possesses Depke's sheer 
will, determination and energy, a scowl that can melt 
iron, a bark that commands attention from Aptakisic to 
Zion, and a soothing retort that turns the spines of 
rugged politicians to jelly: "I don't get mad, I get even." 
Yes, Chairman Depke will be replaced. That's the 
way the system works. But he won't be duplicated. A 
legion of opponents, and scores of voters who know 
him by reputation only, heave a sigh of relief. 

Unless male chauvcnisim rears its head) the new 
chairperson to be elected the first Tuesday of 
December could be a woman. County Board Reps. 
Suzi Schmidt(R-Lake Villa) and Carol Calabresa(R- 
Libertyville) are rated the best chances if board mem- 
bers turn to a woman for leadership. 



i 



n 



Both Schmidt and Calabresa are members of a nine- 
member block of independent Republicans who hope 
to put one of their own into the chair. Their desire to 
slow the pace of growth and development could be 
thwarted by nine organization Republicans who take 
their marching orders from a power structure bent on 
turning suburban Lake County into an urban enclave. 
How the GOP indees and the party regulars deal with 
a possible standoff will be determined how they broker 
their position with the five-member Democratic bloc. 
Or will it be four if Republican Delores Axelrod is suc- 
cessful in knocking off incumbent Democrat Carol 
Spielman (D-Mighland Park)? 

No less than Democratic party chairman Terry Link 
has asserted County Board Democrats will never — 
make that NEVER — support turncoat Rep. David 
Stolman (R-Buffalo Grove) who yeams for the 10th floor 
office. Link's declaration has validity if the Demo bloc 
remains at five. He might have to eat his words if 
Spielman loses. 

Mild-mannered Republican Robert "Bob" Grever, 
well-liked supervisor of Ela Township and a loyal party 
functionary, is positioning himself as a compromise 
candidate. Besides, he has made up his mind that he 
wants the job and has quietly been button-holing col- 
legues for support all summer. 
What is unsettling about the outlook for chairman 
is that no one has been practicing heavy-duty poli- 
tics. How much influence will the outgoing chair- 
man wield in the selection process? Is there a dark- 
horse ready to grasp the reins of power? County 
Board holdovers and prospective* new members 
have been purposefully silent. An uneasiness has 
settled over the process for selecting new leader- 
ship. This is a direct contrast to the Depke years 
where he started early to line up promises and 
worked hard to keep supporters in line. 

So the County Board chairman sweepstakes is up 
in the air as the stretch drive is about to begin. • 



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Novcnb£R 1, 1 996 UkE^d Newspapers- COUNTY 




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New state representative won't be doubling up 

Parti*. lines, the Inlcetnnti hlpmsrtnnorc' arlminU..»t«. a n •_ «.._. ^ __«'_. *. ^**f -^ 



Party Lines, the. Lakeland Newspapers' 
column of political commentary, is pre- 
pared from staff reports. 

One job at a time. No doubling up. 

That's the game plan for new State 
Rep. Mark Beaubien (R-Barrington) 
who has two months to serve before a 
newly elected state representative for the 
52nd District will-be sworn in in January, a 
post he fully expects to retain through 
election Tuesday. 

Appointed to fill. the vacancy created 
by the resignation of AI Snlvl, Beaubien 
vacated a seat on the Lake County Board 
to get a taste of life as a state representa- 
tive. 

The lawyer-banker said he plans to 
serve out his term as supervisor of Guba 
Twp. (Barrington), which ends next April. 
After that — barring an upset in the general 
election — Beaubien will be wearing only 
one elective hat. 

Besides Beaubien's hometown, the 
52nd includes a corner of Ela Township, 
most of Mundelein, WaUconda, Island 
Lake, Grayslake, the Round Lake area, 
Ingleside, and most of Fox Lake. 
• • • 

Running— Lee Hempel, math 
teacher and former village trustee, is con- 
sidering another run at elective office. 
Hempel is a possible candidate for 
Wauconda Township supervisor. The 
open space advocate formerly served on 
the Wauconda Village Board. 

Incumbent Supervisor Jim Keagle 
launched his re-election bid with a combi- 
nation fundraiser-reunion at Mers 
Restaurant that was well attended by 
Republicans . and friends of Keagle's 



administration. Assessor Doris Weldner 
and Highway Com. Frank Gossell will 
be on the Keagle team in 1997. 
.• • • 

Campaigning— Friends of Margaret 
"Suzle" Metzler, retired Lake County 
Republican Federation office dyno and 
long-time GOP cheerleader, are delighted 
to see her on the campaign trail. Suzie 
gathered a stack of.Dole-Kemp signs and 
announced, "I'm going to work." 
• • • 

Count her out— County Board 
Rep. Judy Martini (R-Antioch) has 
doused speculation that she'll be contest- 
ing Supervisor Jim Fields in Antioch 
again in next spring's consolidated elec- 
tions. She lost a supervisor bid in 1993. 

"After the way I went after Fields for 
double dipping in the past, no way am I 
going to run for supervisor," exclaimed 
Martini. Besides, her list of "to do" projects 
as a County Board member still is 17 goals 
from an original 21. 

Martini maintains an interesting cal- 
endar. The hard-working political leader 
does a daily count- 
down toward the 
date the County 
Board leadership 
changes in 

December. 
• • • 

Long-time 
friend— Circuit 
Judge Charles 
"Charlie" Scott, 

who administered 
the oath of office to 
new State Rep. 




Scott 



Mark Beaubien, is the godfather of the 
Beaubien's first child. Judge Scott and 
Beaubien got acquainted as undergradu- 
ates at Northwestern University. They 
went to law school together. 

• • • 

For real?— Al Jourdan of McHenry, 
former Illinois state Republican chairman, 
and a GOP kingpin in McHenry County for 
more than 30 years, is talking about retire- 
ment. But in a joking manner. 

• • • 

Keeping tabs— State Sen. Peter 
Fitzgerald (R-Palatine) still keeps in 
touch with the host of friends he made two 
years ago in an unsuccessful attempt to 
unseat Congressman Phi! Crane in the 
Republican primary. Fitzgerald is moving 
up in leadership in the Senate and is con- 
sidered a safe seat in Tuesday's election. 

• • • 

'15' for Dole and Lake County 
Dems — Lake County Democrats are 
shouting a common theme as.Republican 
presidential candidate Bob Dole along 
the lines of numerology. ' 

While Dole keeps talking about his 15 
percent tax cut for everyone once he's 
elected, the Lake County Dems are saying 
"Punch 15," as in the number 15 on the 

ballot for a straight Democratic party vote. 

• • • 

Judges need your vote— Voters who 
choose the straight party route on election 
day should take a moment to go to the 
back of the book and vote for the judges. 
Judges are not included in the straight 
party vote, and need a 60 percent of the 
vote to win a seat. 



Hall of fame, shame— Two 

prominent local mayors have been 
placed in the Hall of Shame by the Lake 
County Conservation Alliance. 
Grayslake Mayor Pat Carey and 
Gurnee Mayor Dick Welton share this 
designation. Carey is cited forchang- 
ing her mind about the impact of Rte. 
53 since her days 
as a trustee in 
Grayslake. 
Welton is called 
the heir apparent 
to the 

"Bulldozer" title 
previously given 
to outgoing coun- 
ty board chairman 
Bob Depke. 

Earning Hall of 
Fame honors for 
protecting the 
environment are: Gurnee resident Tom 
Chamberlain who brought such 
items as the village's free Great 
America tickets and lack of ethics code 
to the forefront. Impact Coalition co- 
chairman Kim Eudy of Wooster Lake 
was cited for her documentation of vil- 
lage and county meetings in a quest to 
preserve the environment and slow the 
pace of development. County board 
member Martha Marks is cited for 
her outstanding representation on the 
county board and her courage in stand- 
ing up to the development-at-any-cost 
mentality of the majority of county 
board members and Allen Stubitscti 
of Mundelein is cited for his work 
against Rte. 53. 




Carey 



Letters to i\\ e Ed jtor 



Lies becloud campaign 

Editor: 

I attended an anti-Yorkhouse Road 
extension rally before the last general elec- 
tion where Bob Neal expressed, very open- 
ly, that a Yorkhouse Road extension was 
not needed now or ever. A short time later, 
following his reelection to the County 
Board, Neal voted in favor of a land sap 
with the Forest Preserve which was essen- 
tially a vote to extend Yorkhouse Road. 
Neal lied to the citizens of Lake County. 

I called Neal and asked him how he 
could say one thing, one day and vote just 
the opposite a few days later. He asked me, 
"Do you plan on retiring in Lake 
County?"When I replied "no," his 
response was "then why are you worried 
about it?" I was at a loss for words. 

Neal does not care about the people 
of Lake County. He cares only about him- 
self. Isn't it a coincidence that he has 
pushed so hard for procuring a pay raise 
for the Recorder of Deeds— a position he is 
running for in the upcoming election? 
How ethical is that? Does he need even 
more of the taxpayers' money? 

Neal, of course, also favors the exten- 
sion of Route 53. This should not surprise 
any of us— after all, he's a board member 
of the Illinois Tollway Authority, one of the 



Tarnished 



most corrupt, mismanaged, inefficient 
agencies of all time. The more roads he 
builds, the longer he can be paid to man- 
age them. 

Bob Anderson 
Grayslake 

Adoptions for kids 

Editor: 

Adopt a brick, adopt a duck, adopt a 
book, adopt a shelf, adopt a pet, adopt a 
fire hydrant, adopt a zoo animal, adopt a 
cemetery, adopt a highway. 

For November, National Adoption 
Awareness Month, let's adopt a resolution 
to permanently (forever and always) adopt 
only "children." 

Terri Winkates and 

Kathy Casey 

Barrington 

Helps village progress 

Editor: 

Verna Clayton is the most respon- 
sive and knowledgeable state represen- 
tatives 1 have ever met. Her opponent 
chooses to fill the media with sly impli- 
cations that Rep. Clayton is less than 
well-informed about the issues most 
important to her constituents. But the 
facts demonstrate otherwise 



From page C4 

adversaries in the U.S. Senate. 

By any reasonable yardstick, Bill Clinton 
has failed. He is undeserving of a second 
term, a second chance. 

If America is to right itself spiritually and 
ethically, and regain its moral compass, 
Americans confused by a degrading 
counter culture devoid of moral decency, 
a biased liberal media clinging to worn- 
out centerist government ideals and a tax- 
burdened economic system that forces 
parents to subjugate family values just to 
remain solvent, our national leadership 



must be changed Tuesday, Nov. 5. 

A flawed and drifting chief executive 
must be replaced. We fevently hope a 
majority of Americans still agree that our 
president should be a person of strong 
moral character who can be admired and 
trusted. Liberal media pundits are wrong 
about who deserves to be president. 
There still is time for serious-minded, 
understanding Americans to strike back, 
restore dignity and honesty to the presi- 
dency and replace Bill Clinton with Bob 
Dole, a patriot who can be relied upon to 
keep America strong and good. 



As an officer of the Lake Zurich Area 
Chamber of Commerce, I have seen Rep. 
Clayton at work. She was instrumental in 
getting the Illinois Dept. of Transportation 
(IDOT) to attend one of our earliest meet- 
ings regarding the revitalization of down- 
town Lake Zurich. The IDOT representa- 
tive answered several tough questions and 
provided downtown business people with 
a more accurate picture of the future of 
Route 22. She has worked diligently, along 
with Mayor Deborah Vasels, to expedite 
IDOT's plans for Route 22. 

Dino Karahalios 
Lake Zurich 

Gender question 

Editor. 

As a woman, I am offended when 
someone says that I should vote for a can- 
didate because she is a woman. We 
should vote for candidates because they 
are better qualified than their opponents. 

It seems, too, that more is expected of a 
candidate when she is a woman. That is 
okay with me, I guess, except I feel that we 
should expect the most from all candi- 
dates, whether they are men or women. 

In the Lake County Recorder of Deeds 
race, I am supporting Mary Ellen 
Vanderventer, not because she is a 
woman, but because she is the most qual- 
ified. Match her record against Bob Neal 
and, whether you are a man or woman, 
Republican or Democrat, I believe that 
you will come' to the same conclusion: 
Mary Ellen Vanderventer deserves to 

be elected. 

Bess Leary 

Mundelein 

Republican likes Durbin 

Editor: 

While I still consider myself a 
Republican, I will not be voting for Al Salvi 
this year. On Nov. 5, my ballot will be 
marked for Dick Durbin. 

1 suspect that I am not the only 
Republican who won't be voting a straight 



ticket next month. We need a common: 
sense senator, not someone who is in the 
pocket of the NRA and big tobacco compa- 
nies. We need pick Durbin. 

Sandra Lund 
Highland Park 

Latest design in Tricky-Dicky 

Editor: 

If the truth is inconvenient— ignore it. 
If your opponent offers nothing to 
attack— invent a new one. This is the obvi- 
ous strategy being employed by Richard 
Durbin. His conduct during this campaign 
and the senatorial debate has set a new 
low water mark for Illinois politics. 

To suggest that Al Salvi seeks to arm 
street gangs with automatic assault 
weapons is absurd. To make references to 
a "Gingrich/Salvi" plan is ludicrous. 
These are symptomatic of a hyperactive 
imagination that has been induced by 
having been too long in Washington. Mr. 
Durbin has been steeped in an adminis- 
tration that has never been hemmed in by 
truth while flaunting a shameless lack of 
character and integrity. For Mr. Durbin, 
honesty and public service truly are right- 
wing extremism of the worst sort indeed. 
Perhaps this is smoke to distract attention 
from his having voted himself a $35,000 
pay raise while arranging for himself a 
$1.5 million retirement. Perhaps he is 
concerned that voters will recall his writ- 
ing bum checks at the House Post Office 
while drawing a six figure salary (plus 
benefits). 

Mr. Durbin is the embodiment of a 
career politician who long ago lost touch 
with the American work ethic possessed 
by those toiling endlessly to provide a bet- 
ter life for their families. He is clearly dis- 
turbed by the private sector success which 
has come to Al Salvi though his toils, much 
the way a lazy dictator envies the dinner 
appetite of the common laborer. 

To be sure Illinois badly needs a strong 
leader, with a clear vision, who also lacks 
the shackles of being manipulated by 
See LETTERS page C6 



■ 






■ 




COUNTY UkelANd Newspapers NovemBer 1, 1996 



Arkansans may reflect nation in election vote 



HELEN ANDERSON 

Special corespondent 

How do Arkansans feel about 
the upcoming. election? How will 
we vote? 

At this point the polls indicate 
our home state Democratic candi- 
date Bill Clinton is ahead of the 
Republican challenger Bob Dole. 
The Mason-Dixon poll conducted 
by Mason-Dixon Political/Media 
Research, Inc. of Columbia, Md. 
from Oct 14 through Oct. 15 indi- 
cated 54 percent currently support 
Clinton while 36 percent backed 
Dole. 

Even in traditionally 
Republican northwest Arkansas 
(where I live) Clinton has a 49 to 41 
percentage advantage over Dole, 

Six percent throughout the 
state say they are undecided. If 



Letters — 



Local not national issues appear to motivate voters 



these votes opt to vote for another 
candidate, there are plenty of 
choices. There are 13 presidential 
candidates on our Benton County 
ballot starting with the American 
First party of Justice Ralph Forbes 
and Pro-life Anderson. Democratic 
party of Clinton and Gore win the 
thirteenth position while 
Republicans , Dole and Gore have 
fifth spot. The Reform Party of Ross 
Perot and Pat Choate have third 
spot on the ballot. 

We Arkansans will need to 
carefully study the ballot to make 
sure we vote for the party of our 
choice. 

Friends and acquaintances I 
have talked with are on both sides 



of the fence. Benton County where 
we live is heavily Republican. I 
would not be surprised to see Dole 
take the lead here. We have many 
retirees who have settled here and a 
strong business economy. Since we 
have been here (10 years) the 
Republicans have held most county 
offices. 

The state as a whole is becom- 
ing a two party system as evidenced 
by recent public television debates. 
Our current Governor Mike 
Huckabee is Republican; though 
some wiU say that isby default after 
Democrat ]im Guy Tucker resigned 
following conviction in financial 
scandals. Huckabee was an upset 
for Lt. Governor when Tucker ran 



From page C5 

special interest lobbyists. Illinois 
now has the notorious distinction 
of having a senior senator which 
has become an international dis- 
grace and an Illinois embarrass- 
ment. This state cannot afford 
another Rostenkowski-like tax 
and spend "good ol boy" who 
would greedily pursue beltway 
popularity at the expense and 
detriment of the good people of 
Illinois. 

For decades, under Richard 
Durbin and his ilk, millions of 
dollars have flowed to 
Washington to be handed out to 
other states to build freeways, 
leaving Illinoians to be fleeced by 
the Illinois Tollway Club. 
Meanwhile, the lack of leadership 
has helped drive Illinois property 
taxes to among the highest in the 
nation. 

Hey, Illinois, it's time to say 
when. 

Robert T. Warrender 
Lindenhurst 

Avoiding close look 

Editor: 

Of course it's character and 
ethics, stupid! Without either 
there is nothing to support a 
facade or utterances to capture 
an allegiance to one who shuns 
any disclosure and is void of any 
but feigned accomplishments. 

This history of stepping on, 
using the weakness of, and hiding 
behind those held to be in trust to 
the nation, speaks more of arro- 
gance than any compassion for 
others. What the president fears 
most is your character and ethics. 
His whole campaign is feverishly 
scrambling to hide his other face 
that would be recognized if you 
were allowed to see it. He is 
depending on you not to look! 

Donald J. Neseth 
Kildeer 



Shunning issues 

Editon 

The American public deserves 
more. All we hear about today is 
how Dole feels about Clinton's 
views, and how Clinton feels 
about Dole and his opinions. 
These candidates are spending 
more time telling us how. the 
other is wrong, and how they 
would be better, rather than dis- 
cussing the facts and issues. They 
need to tell us how they can do a 
better job, and how they can 
make a difference. 

These candidates need to 
focus on the issues:, education, 
welfare reform, health care. We 



want to know what they think 
about these issues. We also want 
to know what they plan to do, and 
why. These issues are much more 
important than what the candi- 
dates feel they need to say about 
each other. 

S. Powers 
Lindenhurst 

Coffelt does the job 

Editor: 

As a local attorney, I see Sally 
Coffelt and her staff in action on a 
daily basis. The Circuit Court 
Clerk and her staff are polite, effi- 
cient and professional. 

Most importantly, Sally 
Coffelt's office patiently and 
courteously helps non-attorneys 
who are less familiar with the 
laws and procedures pertaining 
to the clerks office. 

Mike Sal vi 
Lake Zurich 

Native gets no help 

Editor: 

So the immigrants want equal 
rights? Does that mean no more 
free help from the government? 

What about the men serving in 
the armed forces? If you want to 
live here you should expect to 
serve this country. 

I have worked hard for my 
money and paid my bills. Nobody 
helps me. 

M. Whitman 
Wauconda 

Keep more pay 

Editor: 

1 admire Bob Dole's ideas to 
help people by letting us keep 
more of our own money. And, I 
am sure, that with a Republican 
congress we can keep more and 
more of our money. - 

Did you ever look at your pay 
check before deductions? We 
would all be well off if we could 
keep most of the money our 
employers put out for us. Vote 
Dole and make your take-home , 
pay larger! 

Elizabeth Clarke 
Lake Forest 

MECCA opens 

Editor: 

Members of the Sexual 
Abuse Intervention Network of 
Lake County congratulates both 
Victory Memorial Hospital and 
the Children's Advocacy Center 
on the opening of the Medical 
Examination Clinic for Child 
Advocacy (MECCA). 

Prior to the opening of 
MECCA at Victory Memorial 
Hospital Lake County children 



who were suspected of having 
been abused were sent to either 
Milwaukee or Chicago for med- 
ical examinations. This served \a s 
further stress already trauma- 
tized children and their families. 
The hospital has provided a 
warm and child-friendly environ- . 
ment which is readily accessible 
to Lake County residents. 

We would also like to 
acknowledge the dedicated 
physicians and nurses who have 
undergone specialized training to 
serve as volunteers in this crucial 
program. 

Donald Sherwood, Psy.D. 

. President 

Sexual Abuse Intervention 

Network of Lake County 



Candidate works 

Editor: 

I am impressed with the way 
Bob Neal can appear in all ends of 
Lake County at the same time. He 
must have a twin brother or 
something. 

Last Saturday, one of my 
friends saw him in Mundelein, I 
saw him in Waukegan and a close 
family friend saw him in Antioch. 

The only way in my book for 
a candidate to earn the support of 
the voters is for the candidate to 
work for it. If Neal's work ethic is 
half as strong as what he has 
shown on the campaign trail, 
then Neal will be an excellent 
Recorder of Deeds. 

He has earned my vote. 

Hazel Frost 
Zion 






for governor after Clinton became 
president. 

We have listened attentively to 
the debates. As in any campaign, 
one must try to sort out fact from 
fiction of claims of what we can do, 
what has been done or to figure 
how a candidate makes a situation 
look best for his side. 

Actually there haven't been 
too many television ads as yet on 
presidential issues and candidates; 
though I am sure they are coming. 
Nor have we seen many presiden- 



many of us, she Is still, weighing 
issues. 

Our seniors are concerned 
about health care and social securi- 
ty. It is difficult to sort out who 
could best protect senior inter- 
ests — as well as other issues facing 
one nation. 

Me? I am still fence sitting but 
at this point leaning toward 
Clinton. My husband, LaVeme, 
feels he will vote for Dole — so we 
will probably cancel each other out. 

The polls point to Clinton. But 
I still remember the 194B elections 
(back in my freshman college year). 
All the polls said Dewey would win. 



tial signs displayed in yards, on bill- As the night dragged on and votes 

boards, etc. were counted, I finally went to bed 

Our emphasis is more local, about 2 a.m. to wake up in the 

For U.S. Senator we have a heated morning to find Truman had won. 

race between our former Attorney Will this be another cliff hangar? 



General Winston Bryant and our 
former Arkansan Congressman 
Tim Hutchinson (who has ties to 
'Gravette) At this point the polls 
show a dead heat in that depart- 
ment. 

Then will we send Asa 
Hutchinson Hutchinson (R) or Ann 



Reasons for Salvi vote 

Editor: 

Thank you, Mr. Durbin, for 
saving me hours of time read- 
ing where you stand on the 
issues as, all I see from your 
commercials, headlines and bi- 
lines in the newspapers are 
guns, guns, guns and yor conti- 
nous attacks on Salvi about 
guns, guns, guns. 

Seeing my life consists of so 
many issues such as the econo- 
my, taxes, truth in sentencing, 
balancing the budget, educa- 
tion, etc. which is what I read 
about Salvi's campaign, you 
leave me no choice but to sup- 
port Salvi. 

I feel a victory for me and all 
lllinoisans is finally coming to 
Washington to represent our fine 
morals, values and standards. 

Go get'em Salvi! Start packing 
your bags. lust as Mr. Smith Goes 
to Washington— so will you! 

Claudette J. Dyback 
Lake Zurich 



Both sides had their booths at 
county and state fairs — but then the 
booths are there even in non-elec- 
tion years. I only saw a few persons 
wearing presidential buttons of 
senior day at the state fair on Oct. 18. 

Our governor was scheduled 
to talk to our senior gathering that 



trip down the Arkansas'River. He 
was promoting a one-eighth per- 
cent sales tax increase which will 
benefit state game and fish pro- 
grams, parks and recreation and 
conservation. 

The tax issue and gambling amend- 
ments plus an issue to fund educa- 
tion, as well as the presidential race 



gambling, lotteries, bingo. The pro-' are drawing a lot of attention to the 

ballot. I really expect a large turnout 
at the polls, While some say they are 
disgusted with the choices. I still 
expect a record turnout. 

I had to chuckle over com- 
ments of 12 year old grandson"; 
Adam as we watched the first 
debates. As he. watched, he ques- 
tioned about Dole, Why does he 
blink his eyes so much. I looked 
more attentively. Sure enough he 
did blink his eyes more than usual 
as he talked. 

Then came, "does he have any 
teeth?" Sure enough as he talked 
you did not see Dole's teeth, but 
you could see Clinton's. The obser- 
vations of a child. Don't forget to 
vote. Study the issues and vote your 
conscience. " 

The personal charges, accusa- 
tions, credibility, trust, he did this, 
he did not do that, rhetoric 
becomes heavier as election day 
draws nearer. Let's stay with the 
issues. 

Editor's note: Before retiring, Helen 
Anderson was employed for 25 years 
by Lakeland Newspapers. Her 
duties included reporting on local 
government and education. She 
and her husband, LaVerne, current- 
ly reside in Gravette, Ark. 



ponents have been hitting hard 
with television advertising, etc. The 
churches in particular are speaking 
out against gambling, but do not 
have funds to match the propo- 
nents for a concentrated media 
blitz. Proponents say how much 
gambling amendments will benefit 
education. Yet as we study how lot- 
teries and gambling, etc. have 
affected other states, we are not so 
sure of the "benefits" and there 
seems to be much on (lie down 
side. 

We are trying to sort out which 
party we feel can do the best for the 
U.S. for health care, taxes, crime 
control, economy, foreign policy. 
It's a tough decision. 

One friend from Iowa, here 10 
years like us, says she does not 
think Dole can do the job. She is a 
very intelligent person who studies 
issues and keeps up on what is hap- 
pening. 

Another friend hails from 
Kansas. While Dole is the "home 
state" candidate, she has reserva- 
tions! feels he has been a good leg- 
islator in Washington but would he 
be able to work with the next con- 
gress: She wonders, does he have 
the expertise to do the job. Like 



Election information and results 
to be available on the Internet 

Nov. 5 general election information will be available on the 
Internet on the county clerk's web pages at http://www.co.lake.il.cnty- 
clk/voter.htm. 

The page also includes information about how to vote by absentee 
ballot, when and where to vote, the candidates and issues on the ballot 
and where to find election results. 

"An internet user will find images- of ballot pages, can locate the 
address of his polling place or the address of township and municipal 
offices which offer in-person absentee voting to their residents and 
also view the hours these offices are open. The clerk's office has also 
put out a wide range of other information that should be helpful before 
going to the polls," Willard Helander, county clerk said. 

In addition, election results will be available on the internet as 
soon as the ballots are tabulated. The results will be updates regularly 
throughout election night. Internet users will need. to reload the page 
to view results added to the tabulation as the evening progresses'. The 
results are unofficial. 

Election results may also be viewed at the county buil ling on 
closed circuit television. The main lobby will be open at 8 p.m. and 
remain open until all votes are counted. 



Henry (D) as our representative for day. However, he was on a fishing 
the third Congressional District to 
the 103rd Congress. Incidentally, 
Asa is Tim's brother. 

What will probably bring votes 
out in large numbers are the consti- 
tutional amendments on the ballot. 
There are four amendments which 
prop6se gambling in various fash- 
ion for the state; casinos, video 






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Novcmder1, 1996 UIceUncJ Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



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Hubert Humphrey, Barry Goldwater looking better all the time 



If it's mud you see flying, it must be elec 
tion time again. I'll admit I am becoming 
more cynical about the political process each 
election year. 

In my opinion, this year's presidential 
election maybe the best example of having to 
vote for the evil of two lessors in recent histo- 
ry I will vote, but Barry Goldwater and Hubert 
Humphrey are looking better all the time. 

The disappointing issue to me is that 
both candidates from the major parties are 
sounding more and more alike. Because the 
promises and success claims are so similar, I 
can hardly tell which candidate is the 
Republican, and which is the Democrat We 
may be moving toward a one-party system 
after all. Should we call it the Repocrats or the 
Democans? 

Let me list some of the similarities to 
prove my point First, both candidates say 
they believe in small government Their 



records promise that we'll get quite a lot of it. 

Second, both candidates proclaim them- 
selves to be leaders. They should look over 
their shoulders to 
see that the major- 
ity of Americans 
aren't following. 
More importantly, 
most Americans 
aren't even inter- 
ested enough to 
vote. 

Next, both can- 
didates say they 

feel our pain. They know how hard we work 
to pay our taxes and they can help us. I find it 
pretty amusing since neither candidate has 
ever had a real job. 

Both candidates talk about reducing gov- 
ernment spending. However, while they are 
talking, spending will reach an all time high 




this year and government growth continues 

to-out pace the private sector. 

Both candidates say they care about our 
social security and 
retirement years. 
However, their own 
government pen- 
sions and retire- 
ment benefits 
would care for more 
than 100 ordinary 
citizens in retire- 
ment They care, we 

.pay* 

Both candidates say they want to help 
small businesses. However, both have voting 
records which make the federal government 
the highest-paid, non-productive senior 
partner of every small-business owner in the 
country. 

Both candidates are adept at making stir- 



MiNdiNq Your 
Own BusiNEss 

Don TayLor 



ring political speeches. However, neither 
appreciates the importance of keeping the 
beginning of those speeches close to the end. 

Both candidates arc quick to point out 
their past successes. 

However, I would remind you that even a 
blind hog can occasionally find an acorn In 
an oak grove. 

Both candidates want government to 
solve our problems. In truth, it never has and 
never will. 

I will vote anyway. 

Despite my cynicism, I will vote. You 
should, too. 

It is easy to be cynical. Anyone can criti- 
cize our leaders forall the ills big government 
creates. I am guilty. It is easier to complain 
than to get involved. 

However, we must remember that we are 
the government We have an obligation — a 
See VOTING page C8 




CCTATF Lakeland 

I ^J i I /~\ [j |_ Newspapers 



receives 



Keym Marchman, HUD. 
Acting Assistant Secretary for. 
Public and Indian Housing, 
awarded Lake' County. 
Housing Authority their pres- 
tigious "Sustained • : 
Performance Award." Retiring 
Commissioner Jean Baenziger 
traveled to Washington, D.C, 
to receive the award on behalf . 
of the Authority^ 

^Commissioner Baenziger 
commented that she was 
proud to accept the award 
and noted that as a result of 
diligence and dedication by 
corhrriissioners and staff HUD 
has recognized LCHA for its 
assistance to residents of Lake 

I County. :.; -..'_ 

. . LCHA is one of only three 
housing authorities in 'the' 

. State of Illinois to receive the 
award; a total of 79 awards 

» were granted to agencies 
throughout the I nation. There 
are 1 J6 housing authorities in 
Illinois arid over 3,300 in the 
United States. •■ .■ 

FoUowing presentation of 
the a wards Acting Assistant 
Secretary Marchrhari stated 
thatf by steadily upgrading 
me quality of public housing 
mmeircorhm^des,mese • 

' r housing authorities have been 
able to transform and 
imprbye living ^conditions for 
thousands of families;" 



, ■■■' 

'.V I 




Change Dlv. 



Company Price 
Abbott 50 5/8-174 
Allstate : 55'3/4 +2 
AmeritechS5 5/8 -1/8 
AT&IH 35 5/8 -41/4 
Baxter 41 1/4 -27/8 
■Bmnswick 23 5/8; >3/8i 
Unicom 25 3/4 +1/8;:; 
D. Witter 591/8 +1/2 
McDbnalds441/2-l/4 
Motbrbla 451/2 -3 



Peoples En; 34 7/8+3/8 
Qkr.Oats 35 1/8; -11/4 
Sara Lee 35 3/4 -3/4^ 
Sears A 481/2— -- 
UAL ; 451/4 -1/8 
Watgreens 37 1/4 -1/4 
WMXTech.34 3/4+1/8 
Cherry Elec 10 1/4 — -- 
Brwru Fenis 25 1/4 -1 \._ 
AT&T continues to slide after 
spinning off Lucent. 

Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Seldettberg of Edward D. 
Jon' '' : Grayslake. 



$0,96 
$0.85 
$2.12 
$1.32 
$1.13 
$0.50 
:$1."60 
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$1.84 
$1.14 
$0.76 
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$0.00 
$0.44 
$0.60 
$0.00 
$0.68 



Tae Kwon Do, spirit carries into every part of student's life 



GLORIA DAVIS 

Staff Reporter 

Despite the fact that the literal 
translation of Tae Kwon Do is "the 
art of kicking and punching," learn- 
ing self defense, or the art of the 
attack, is a minimal part of the spir- 
it of Tae Kwon Do. 

According to Master Kim, 
owner and operator of I. W. Kim 
Tae Kwon Do, at 750 Milwaukee 
Ave., in Gumee, "Tae Kwon Do can 
change one's life for the better for- 
ever." The translation for the 
Korean word "Tae" means "to 
Jack," and "Do" is loosely "a philo- 
sophical viewpoint." 

The practice of Tae Kwon Do 
dates back to 50 B. C, to the area in 
the South Pacific now known as 
Korea. The practice of Taek Kyon, 
the earliest form of what is now 
known as Tae Kwon Do, is pictured 
on the walls of ancient Oriental 
tombs. 

The first kwan ("school') to 
teach the native Korean style of 
martial arts was opened after World 
War II, in Yong Chun, Seoul, in 
1945. The popularity of Tae Kwon 
Do grew rapidly and in 1953 seven 
other major schools were estab- 
lished. In 1945 the "kicking" form of 
martial arts gained a strong 
foothold in the Korean Army and at 
the height of the Korean War, in 
1952, it became a regular part of 
military training in Korea. 

By 1988, Tae Kwon Do was a 
demonstration sport at the 
Olympic Games being held in 
Seoul. Today, it is estimated that 
there are 20 million people who 
have studied, or are studying, Tae 
Kwon Do in over 140 countries all 




;- ■ ™^^^^ ^^_^__— — — — — — " "' ~^~^~^^^^^ — — 

Students of Master Kim put on quite a demonstration during the grand opening of l.W. Kim Tae 
Kwon Do in Gumee. The new location is at 750 Milwaukee Avenue.— Photo by Linda Chapman 



over the world. 

According to Master Yeon Hee 
Park and Master Yeon Hwan Park, 
in their book, "Tae Kwon Do," there 
are 11 Tae Kwon Do command- 
merits; loyalty to one's country, 
respect for parents, faithfulness to 
one's spouse, respect for brothers 
and sisters, loyalty to friends, 
respect for elders, respect for teach- 
ers, never take life unjustly, pos- 
sessing an indomitable spirit, 
school loyalty and learning always 
to finish what one starts. 

Master Kim came from Korea to 



Lake County 28 years ago, in 1968, 
bringing with him a way of life that 
includes control of one's mind and 
body, that he learned in his native 
country. Today; with his children, 
Tae Kwon Do students, all grown, 
Kim lives in Lindenhurst and oper- 
ates his school in Gumee. 

"The art of Tae Kwon Do gives 
one self confidence, teaches one to 
practice self discipline and self con- 
trol, all of which leads to living a 
better life," says Kim. 

Devotees of the art feel that 
practicing it requires entering into 



rigorous physical exercise that 
improves the student's way of life- 
both physically and mentally. 

"One must like and believe in 
the essence of Tae Kwon Do for it to 
work, " says Kim. Master Kim asks 
his students, who range in age from 
four years old to 66 years old, to give 
the art a few months of trial, three 
time a week, to see if the philoso- 
phy is meant for them. 

Since Tae Kwon Do is a way of 
life, students are always learning, in 
fact the teachers consider them 
See TAE KWON DO page C8 



have studied, or are studying, lae ^T" 1 ' u ♦ — TZ b nl.' ' f 

Kwon Do in over 140 countries all to finish what one starts. Devotees of 

Master Kim came from Korea to practicing it requires euicmig u«u v™= ««^ «.-. v « — y~ b 

Grinnell, Depke to say 'farewel l* at pow er breakfast 

Former Lake County Sheriff answer questions, mingle with Robert; 
rifntnn O. Grinnell and outgoing friends and say farewell to their (Mickey) 



Former Lake County Sheriff 
Clinton O. Grinnell and outgoing 
Lake County Board Chairman 
Robert Depke greetjhe public for 

perhaps the 
last time at 
the Nov- 
ember meet- 
ing of the 
Lake County 
P o we r 
Breakfast at 
M idl ane 
Country 
Club in 
Wadsworth. 
The Nov. 6 
meeting offers an interesting forum 
for the two veteran office holders to 




Grinnell 



answer questions, mingle with 
friends and say farewell to their 
constituents. 

"The Lake County Power 
Breakfast Is delighted to offer a plat- 
form for Sheriff Grinnell and Bob 
Depke to make some 'final com- 
ments about their years in office," 
according to Lenny Khayat of 
Midlane Country Club. "Both Clint 
and Bob have served with enthusi- 
asm and a great deal of energy. 
While some may have occasionally 
disagreed with their views, both 
men distinguished themselves as 
community leaders because they 
held the best interests of Lake 
County in their hearts." 

Grinnell replaced the legendary 




Robert 
(Mickey) 
Babcox as 
Sheriff in the 
late '80s after 
Babcox died 
in office. 
Prior to his 
stint as sher- 
iff, Grinnell 
served terms 
as Chief _ ; 
Deputy Ue P Ke 
Sheriff and Libertyville Police Chief. 
He retired for health and family rea- 
sons in early October. 

While Depke is leaving the Lake 
County Board after leading that 
body the last several years, he will 



remain active in county politics. He 
recently announced his candidacy 
for re-election to the position of 
Warren Twp. Supervisor, a post 
he's held for over 30 years. 

The Lake County Power 
Breakfast is open to the public 
beginning at 7:30 a.m. The Power 
Breakfast is taped for replay on US . 
Cable Channel 3 where it can be 
seen at 7 p.m. Monday and 
Wednesday evenings throughout 
the month starting Nov. 11. 
Reservations are accepted at 
Midlane Country Club, 360-0550. 
For more information, contact 
Charles C. Isley III, president/CEO 
of the Lake County Chamber of 
Commerce. 









BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkEUwd Newspapers IMovEMbER 1 , 1 996 







GHS golfcart gets a new look 

Sterling Finish Autobody/Collision specialists, Lake Villa and former Crayslake High School stu- 
dents, Brian Kavich and Rob Whalen along with CHS parent Terry Hagen, all employed at 
Sterling Finish, donated their time and talents to get the "ram mobile" back into shape for the 
1996-97 sports season. Transportation was provided by Michael Herman of Wildwood Towing. 



Person neIs 



Sara Farrington 

Libertyville resident Sara 
Farrington joined the sales staff of 

Century 21 
Kreuser and 
S e i I e r . 
Farrington is 
a graduate 
of the Univ. 
of Kansas 
and has 
re cen tly 
completed 
Century 21's 
extensive "21 Plus" training pro- 
gram. The Farrington family have 
relocated 14 times in the past 25 
years and is certainly familiar with 
the process from a consumer's 
viewpoint. The Farrington family 
lives in the Rockland Woods area of 
Libertyville. 




Michael Lescher 

Michael Lescher, assistant 
managing broker at RE/MAX 
Advantage Realty in Antioch closed 
five transactions in October bring- 
ing his sales 
volume for 
1996 to a 
record 
breaking 
$7,569,700. 
Specializing 
in the Chain 
O'Lakes 
area 
Lescher was[ 
licensed in 
1988, earned his broker's license 
and GRI designation in 1989 and is 
currently a member of the Board of 
Directors of the Lake County Assn. 
of Realtors. He lives in Fox Lake 





Tae Kwon Do 



From page C7 

selves students still learning how to 
improve their lives. Master Kim has 
a student that enrolled in his first 
class in 1968 still 'attending class. 

One cannot fully understand, 
touch, or feel the spirit of Tae Kwon 
Do. It can only be experienced. 

Master Kim is himself a "Black 
Belt," a title which has grown to 
symbolize fighting and violence. 
But he believes more than the com- 
bative reputation, feeling healthy 
and physically fit, are greater bene- 
fits of studying the art. 

In these days of the popularity 
of many ways to gain physical fit- 



ness, Tae Kwon Do is 6ne of the 
best ways. 

By 1996, many Tae Kwon Do 
schools have been opened all over 
the world. Master Kim's school is 
one of the oldest in Lake County. 
Parents send young students 
Master Kim to learn self control and 
self respect, at an early age. 

I. W. Kim Tae Kwon Do holds 
classes for men, women and chil- 
dren, from pre-school to senior cit- 
izen ages, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, and from 
9 a.m. to noon on Saturday. Anyone 
interested can call 362-7750 for 
more information. 



with his wife and two children, 
where he serves on the Economic 
Develop-ment Commission and as 
vice president of the School Board 
of Dist. 114. 

Florence EmUng 

Florence Emling, a specialist in 
residential real estate with Coldwell 
Banker Libertyville, was appointed 
to the 1996 
National 
Assn. for 
Female 
Executives — 
Public Policy 
Council 
Emling is 
representa 
tive of the 
Midwest 

region. NAFE, National Assn 
Female Executives, seeks 
empower its members, through 
education, networking and public 
advocacy. The mission of the NAFE 
Public Policy Council is to identify 
issues that support equal access, 
opportunity, advancement and 
responsibility in the workplace. 
She is a million dollar producer. 

WallySeegren 

Wally Seegren, commercial/ 
investment sales consultant for 
Century 21 Maki United 
announced that he has sold the- 
Professional Office Building, locat- 
ed at 1400 Sunset Ave., Waukegan. 
The building was designed and 
constructed in 1966 for the former 
owner, Dr. Maynard Fields and his 
wife Blanche. They both have 
retired to their condominium in 
Key Biscayne, Fla. 



for 
to 



Company founder dies at 84 



Officials and employees of the 
Grieve Corporation are mourning 
the passing of company founder 
and retired chairman of the board 
George Price Grieve. 

The Glenview man died Oct 25 
at the age of 84, almost 47 years 
after he founded the company that 
is now located in Round Lake. 

A native of Iowa, he graduated 
from Iowa State University with a 
degree in agricultural engineering 
and put his knowledge to work for 
the Civilian Conservation Corps 
and later the Portland Cement 
Association. 

World War II found him serving 
as a second lieutenant in the South 
Pacific, then as part of the army of 
occupation in Japan. Upon his 
release, he came to the Chicago 
area where his wife and son were 
living. 

He found a job antHater decid- 
ed to seek his fortune on his own. A 



small metal 
shop pur- 
chased in 
1947 for 
$1,000 was 
the nucleus 
of what 
eventually 
became the 
Grieve 
Corporation. 
Several relo- 
cations 
eventually! 
brought the 
manufacturer of industrial ovens to 
the present Round Lake 110,000- 
square-foot facility. 

Grieve is survived by his wife 
Helen, sons Philip and Douglas, his 
sisters Sara Thomas and Mary 
Jacobson, seven grandchildren and 
four great-grandchildren. A memo- 
rial service was held Oct 30 at the 
Glenview Community Church. 




Midwest remains region to 
watch for inflationary indicators 



The Midwest remains the 
region to watch as the U.S. econo- 
my continues to walk the fine line 
between growth and inflation, 
according to Diane C. Swonk, 
deputy chief economist of The 
First National Bank of Chicago. 

In her monthly "First 
Forecasts" newsletter, u Swonk said 
the Midwest will continue to out- 
pace the nation on growth through 
the rest of the year due to better 
consumer' fundamentals and to 
gains in nOn-automotive manu- - 
factoring. 

But the- region's tight labor 
markets should be watched for 
signs that demand for workers will 
push up wages and ignite inflation. 

The First Chicago Great Lakes 
Index (GL1) should rise by 2.7 per- 
cent in the fourth quarter, 0.6 per- 
cent ahead of the national- Gross 
Domestic Product (GDP), Swonk 
said. The Great Lakes Index, creat- 
ed by First Chicago, measures the 
total output of goods and services 
within the five-state region of 
Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio 
and Wisconsin. 

The economy will be helped by 
lower mortgage rates, which are 
likely to trigger higher household 
spending, and by manufacturing 
demand fueled by exports and 

• equipment spending gains. 

"But the region's tight labor 
markets limit the extent to which 
we can exploit these opportuni- 
ties," she said. 

Employers across the Midwest 
are complaining about a shortage 

* of workers particularly at the entry 
level, Swonk said. And the unem- 
ployment rate continues to hover 
near a 20-year low: It's less then 2 
percent in some areas of 
Wisconsin. Wages have edged up 
in recent months, increasing the 
risk of rising production costs. 

It hasn't happened yet. "With 
the exception of the volatile energy 
and food sectors, prices are decel- 



. crating, and inflationary pressures 
continued to abate in the third 
quarter," Swonk said. 



Voting- 



From page C7 

responsibility — to chart the course 

of our country for the future. We 

must not become complacent, we 

must involve ourselves in the 

process. 

There is no freedom without 
obligation. It is our responsibility to 
be aware of the political environ- 
ment and safeguard our freedom. 
The entire foundation of our free 
enterprise system demands a vigi- 
lant population. In order to pre- 
serve and protect our unique form 
of government, we must all be 
involved. This requires our atten- 
tion every day, not just at election 
time. 

We certainly must take the time 



to vote. When we select candidates 
who most closely represent our 
views, we help direct the course our 
nation takes in the coming year. 
Every vote is important. 

On Nov. 5, we can choose to 
elect qualified men and women 
who will manage the affairs of our 
government in a business-like 
manner. The future of small busi- 
ness, as well as our nation, rests in 
our hands. 

Editor's note: Don Taylor is the 
co-author of "Up Against the Wat- 
Marts." Questions may be sent to 
him in care of "Minding Your Own 
Business," P.O. Box 67, Amarillo, TX 
79105. 



BARBARA E. RICHARDSON says, 

"Thank you for your support, " 
lam unopposed in the Nov. 5 
election and that makes me 
even more gratefidfor the trust 
and confidence given my 
administration of the office I 
serve and have served for 14 
years. I could not have done the 
job without the help 
and cooperation of SO many. 
I am so honored to have the privilege to continue 
serving you as CORONER OF LAKE COUNTY. 
Tliank You, ^ 




l_^_ 



WeIcome 
WAqoN 

Has useful gifts and helpful 
information for you... 



ALL 



i 



Just Engaged? New Parent? Moved? 




. FoxLoko/ 

Ingleside/ 
Spring Grove 

Glenda 
587-6015 



Grays! ake 
Wildwood 

Kim • Linda 
566-9536 223-1607 



Gurnee 
Lori Debbie 

548-8740 223-1168 



Lake Villa 
Lindenhurst 

Jennifer 
548-2423 



Lake 
Zurich 

Anne 
540-5790 



Long Grove 

. Kildeer 

Hawthorn Woods 

Mary 
438-0287 



Vernon Hills 

Doris 
680-7276 



You are entitled to 
a complimentary 
subscription from 
your hometown 
newspaper. To 
receive your paper, 
contact your 

Welcome Wagon 
representative or 
call Lakeland 

Newspapers at 
(847) 223-8161. 



i 



I 










- 



l' 









■ 






NovEMbtR 1, 1996 UIceUncI Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 





-This WAy To WEAm V 

New ideas for long term health care 



ALAN NADOLNA _____ 

As Americans live longer, there is an 
increasing chance of a need for long term 
care or home health care. There is an 
unique group of policies which combine 
several benefits in one contract. The poli- 
cies we like, overcome the deficiencies of 
the traditional long term care policies writ- 
ten by a number, of companies. Traditional 
policy premiums will increase in the near ■ 
future. If an individual never needs any 
form of long term/home health care, the 
premiums expended are gone. The benefit 
provided by these traditional policies my 
' be insufficient at the time they are finally 
needed. 

Traditional policies have not tax bene- 
fits. The life/long term care contracts we 
recommend will not have any change in 
premium. The benefit increases annually. 
If there is no need for the policy benefits, 
. the purchaser can pass the policy benefits 
on to their beneficiary income (and possi- 
bly estate) tax-free. The policy can be sur- 
rendered at any time for the entire premi- 
um paid plus interest earned (less a sur- 
render charge), but never less than the 
original premium. 



The life policies have added benefits 
which have made them even more attrac- 
tive. Benefits can now be guaranteed for 
life regardless how long one requires long 
term care/home health care. 

Cost of living riders are available which 
will increase the ultimate benefit even 
more than base policy. 

Now, Congress has added a new signifi- 
cant benefit to these contracts. Payments 
for long term care and/or home health 
care to a chronically ill individual will be 
income tax free. This development clarifies 
the government intent that individuals 
cannot rely on Medicare, Medicaid and 
similar programs — they are responsible for 
personally funding long term and home 
health care. 

Editor's note: Alan Nadolna, is a consul- 
tant to financial service organizations and 
is a financial advisor to corporations and 
individuals. He is a member of a panel of 
financial experts preparing This Way to 
Wealth. Questions are invited by writing to 
Nadolna at Associates in Financial 
Planning, 633 SkokieBlvd., Suit e 308A, . 
Northbrook, IL 60062 or call 1(800)428- 
9786 or (847)509-5090. 



Small practice conference set 



The Illinois CPA Society will host two sep- 
arate sessions of its annual Small Practice 
Conference for small practitioners in 
Bloomington, IU. on Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 
Turner's Castle Lodge, 1801 Jumer Dr., and in , 
Rosemont on Friday, Nov. 8 at the Rosemont 
Convention Center, 5555 N. RivecRd. As part 
of the all-day conferences, John KenneolJy 
and Terry Dodds, two well known small firm 
strategists, will. conduct lectures on produc- 
tivity, profitability, marketing and growth 
issues. 

Additionally, the Small Practice 
Conferences will cover such topics as: mar- 
keting for today's small firms— how to 
expand a practice, how to recruit and retain 
clients, how to increase referrals and tips on 
"closing the sale;" boosting practice produc- 
tivity and profitability; and how to recognize 
and respond to industry trends, take steps to 
avoid "future shock" and actually thrive in the 
new practice environment. The conferences 



will also include roundtable discussions in 
the afternoon, where participants will be able 
to interact and communicate with both 
experts and their peers on the latest small 
practice issues and concerns, and will con- 
clude with a technical session on the new IRS 
appeals review of levy enforcement and the 
Taxpayer Bill of Rights 2, which wiil be hosted 
by the IRS Chief of Collections in Chicago 
and a leading tax attorney. 

Participants at both of the conferences 
will receive eight continuing professional 
education credits for attending. The registra- 
tion fee for the conferences is $220 for Illinois 
CPA Society members and $260 for non- 
members. 

To register, contact the Illinois CPA 
Society at (312)993-0393 or 1(800)993-0393, 
or fax (312)993-9432. For information on 
additional CPA Society programs, events, 
services, individuals can visit the Society's 
Web site at http://www.icpas.org. 



To Earn Soaring Rates With 
Down-to-Earth Minimums, 



to the EAGLE... 




The EAGLE Money Market Account. 






5.01% 

- A.P.Y.witha 
$10,000 minimum 



Earn a big 5.01% APY with as little as $10,000 in your 

EAGLE Money Market Account at ARGO Federal! Is this 

a special, once-irva-lifetime, promotional deal? Not at all. 

It's our normal, everyday, high EAGLE rate. Ours is 

always at or near the top of rates paid in the market. 

Compare for yourself. If you don't bank at ARGO 

Federal yet, check the rates where you do bank. Check 

the minimums. Then check in at ARGO Federal and let 

your rate soar with the EAGLE. Only our minimum balance is down-to-earth. 



ARGCf - GURNEE 

FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, FSB 

6121 Washington Street.* Gurnee, IL 60031 • Phone 847-855-2100 
' Othlr locations include Summit (main office), 
Bridceview, Dolton, and Madison Street in Chicago . 




m 



Member 
F.D.I.C. 



Rale, on the EAGLE Money Market Account arc object to change M any lime. The Annual P«eenU B e Y«W » based on month v 

compounding under the ast.imptian'ih.11 principal and mte.cM lems.r. on depcrtil for one yea.. For statement cycles in which the balance 

fall* below the rn.mn.um or the (reaction hmilaiiora a.e exceeded, ,1 SSO sciv.ee charge will be a««sed and the account will earn m.eresl 

at the posted N.O.W. Account rale of .merest. No more thans., w.thdrawals nnd/or transfers may be made per slaiemervi cyde, no more 

than three of which maybe made by check or other debit lothi.d parties. Ammiimim amount of S500 applies to, a» withdrawals. 



What is a Moola Moola? And who are the Money Minders? 



Moola Moola is a magical money monster from the make-believe 

land of Lotta Loot. And the Money Minders are his colorful side- 

kicks 

Together, they are Moola Moola and the Money Minders - an 

exciting new savings club. 

"I'm Moola Moola, and wherever I go 
magnificent things are sure to happen. 
And these are my friends, the Money 
• Minders." 



Scratch, the oldest of them all, is 
scraping and scratching around 
(or those hard-to*flnd dollars. 







Give the magic of Moola Moola and Money Minders to 
the children you love today. 

For birthdays, Christmas or any occasion, a club mem- 
bership is a wonderful gift. 



Ponnyopolop, the baby of 
the Money Minders, gets her 
two-cents worth- lolloping 
after everyone's pennies so 
that she can buy lots of 
penny lollypops. 




Nlckelodeo toddles high and 
lodeo after nickels to satisfy 
his growing curiosity. 



Where Should 

You Go? To... 

MCHENRY STATE BANK 
75 10W. ELM STREET 



TWo-Blts talks 25 timos faster than 
any of the other Money Minders and 
tricks Moola Moola out of quarters. 




DooDaDimo digs on 
dimes which he spins like 
tops one at a dooda time. 



McHenry State Bank 



CERALDJ. CAREY BUILDING 
1208 N. RICHMOND ROAD 



ROBERT L. WEBER BUILDING 
4502 CRYSTAL LAKE ROAD 



JOHNSBURC FACILITY 
5805 WILMOT ROAD 



Financial 







BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE La^Ianc] Newspapers NovEMbER 1, 1996 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



program 



iww lusui program neips 

Lake County home buyers 

First of America Mortgage Co. is now hold another year or more to save enougl 

nffpriner a now mnrtoaop Inan nrnoram insr tn nav fnr thf>$f> cither costs associate 



First of America Mortgage Co, is now 
offering a new mortgage loan program 
which allows a borrower to purchase a 
home with only 3 percent down payment. 
While there are other mortgage programs 
that require low down payments, this pro- 
gram is unique. 

"When we say 3 percent down, we 
mean 3 percent down, period," said Frank 
Sabor, mortgage sales manager at First of 
America. This innovative new loan pro- 
gram, called the First of America Super 
Affordable Mortgage Loan, is different 
from other mortgage programs because it 
finances all customary costs associated 
with buying a home. Under other loan pro- 
grams, a borrower must have enough 
money for not only a down payment, but 
also for closing costs — and these can be 
substantial. •" 

"This is exactly why we decided to offer 
this new loan program. After all, how many 
borrowers have enough money saved to 
afford a $3,000 down payment for a 
$100,000 home, but don't have quite 
enough to pay another $2,000 to $4,000 in 
additional closing costs or in points to try 
to lower the interest rate? In today's eco- 
nomic climate, with higher rent payments, 
car payments, medical expenses, and other 
usual living costs, it could take a house- 



hold another year or more to save enough 
just to pay for these other costs associated 
with buying a home." 

With the Super Affordable Mortgage 
Loan, the borrower finances closing costs 
in a second mortgage that was specifically 
designed to help home buyers purchase a 
home sooner than they thought possible. 

For a household to be eligible for a 
Super Affordable Loan, they must earn 100 
percent or less of the county's median 
income. In Lake County, this is currently 
$66,100. In addition, this program is not 
limited to first-time home buyers and a 
variety of property types are eligible, 
including single-family homes, condo- 
miniums, and two-family homes. , 

"If a family within the program's 
income limits and they have saved 3 per- 
cent of the purchase price of a home, the 
Super Affordable Mortgage Loan may pro- 
vide the means to make it happen," Sabor 
concluded. "With the Super Affordable 
Mortgage Loan, a potential home buyer 
just might begin to build their own equity 
instead of someone else's." 

For more information about the First of 
America Super Affordable Mortgage Loan, 
contact First of America Mortgage Co. at 
816-5849 or visit the First of America Bank 
branch nearest you. 



223-8161 



TODAY! 
Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Joe Tomasello 



LAKE COUNTY'S 
MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS 

Specialists Since 1919. 
Now Celebrating Our 77th Year! 



HOMETOWN SPECIALISTS 

IN 

•Conventional Loans f IHDA Loans 

•Construction Loans (First Time Home Buyers) 

•Commercial Loans •Home Start Program 




John Hansen 




Dec Garcia 




APPLY AT OUR LENDING OFFICE 

5384 GRAND AVE., GURNEE 

OR 



V 



CALL 249-6312 




sag* 



"_-'=- the— r 

■"^-HQMETO' 




Ray Georges 




FIRST FEDERAL BANK, » 

Wholly Owned Subsidiary, Northern States Financial Corporation 
MA1N0FFICE LEWIS AVE. OFFICE GURlV 



BR6!fflL=J 

LEHUEH 



Al Oiler 



Madison at County St 1428 North Lewis 
Waukegan, IL 60085 Waukegan, 1L 60085 
(847)623-0084 (847)249-6307 



5384 Grand Avenue 

Gumee,IL 60031 

(847) 249-6312 



North Shore Trust and Savings . 



Proudly serving our community for 75 years! 
Join in the celebration— open a r 

Diamond Arifttiv ersarv CD 







W* 



♦ *75 % boniiS rate over current 6 month CD rate ^ 

To cam the .75* bonus rate, a new or existing interest-earning NOW checking account Is required. 

To Celebrate Our 75 th Anniversary 

♦ All new or existing North Shore NOW checking accounts will earn 
♦75 over our current rate for 75 days, 

♦ New NOW accounts receive 75 FREE checks and a 
FREE Cash Station® ATM Card. 

Hurry in to take advantage of our 
J! 5 Diamond Anniversary Specials., 

Because unlike a diamond, 

which lasts forever, 

these great rates 

won't! 



TRUST AND SAVINGS 



700 S. .Lewis Avenue 
\V;mke|r.m, II. (H\W 
S47-.iJ6--WjO 

12)3N.UreenHiiyRoiul 

.Wiuikouan, I L 60085 

847-625-3100 

H)IC Insured 



* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) In oHoct as of October 18. 1996. Rate Is eubject to change without notice. This Is a 
limited otter tor personal accounts onty and may be withdrawn at any time. No minimum balance required on now 
account H $1 ,000 balance Is maintained In any other deposit account.There Is a penalty for early withdrawal. ' ! 



HCSllETOWN ATTENTION 




&omyb(ur 






LETUSffllLPYOUTOHA 

i . u \ \ m\mmmmmmmmmaMmmrmi w i h i i .m — w— n n — wwm n . 

•Home Equity Credit Line 
• Home Improvement Loan 
i • New or Used G^ Loan 
^•Mortgage Loans ^ ; 




■,-■■: :.v>i$'.* 



24 HOUR PRE-APPROVAL In Waukegan 

CAD DCDCHM A I I7EH Bi " Russe "> Joe Panek > & Jirn Gitziaff 

SERVICE 244-6000 

& MORE INFORMATION 

Mike Renschen 

SEE OR CALL: 395-6822 



For HOMETOWN ATTENTION, It's your HOMETOWN BANK! 

BANK of TK^KEGAN 

- •• ... ...has a heart 

& : Antioch Facility 

Route 59 at Grass Lake Road 




(847)395-6822 







cflmnflTion' 



Cehder 



i 



Main Office West Side Facility 

1601 N. Lewis Green Bay Road at Grand Ave. 
(847)244*000 (847)244.6000 •'Sc? 



" A, Wholly owncU subsidiary of 

Northern Status 'Financial 

Corporation. 



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NoveMbER 1, 1996 UltElANd Newspapers ELECTION '96 



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Neal, Vanderventer face off in Recorder of Deeds race 





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Neal 



Robert P. Neal, ~ 
Republican 

Most Important function of 
Recorder of Deeds: The most 
important function is "protecting 
and recording your family's invest- 
ment." The primary responsibility 
is the accurate and timely mainte- 
nance of titles to $40 billion worth 
of Lake County land. A simple error 
can cost a homeowner hours of 
work and hundreds of dollars in 
legal fees to resolve. 

Perhaps just as important is 
the Archival Preservation of all transactions. 
What changes would be made?: When I get elected, I 
will interview each employee.on how to improve the func- 
tions of the office. We will move forward with the mod- 
ernization begun by the Recorder of 36 years — Frank 
Nustra. We will convene an Advisory committee made up 
of users of the office^ We will, within 4 years, have imaging 
of documents in place to allow for remote access. This will 
'save citizens of Lake County hours of driving to come into 
the Recorder's office. 

Why are you the better candidate?: My broad admin- 
- istrative experience — in both business and military organi- 
zations — is well-suited to the office of Lake County 
Recorder of Deeds. I hope to prove that government can 
. serve us better and still save us money. 

My education and background show that 33 years in 
business, 23 years in local, township and county govern- 
ment have given me the qualities which. are necessary to- 
being a good recorder, a strong business background; the 
ability to manage technical programs; a reputation for being 
good with people; trustworthiness; knowledge of comput- 
ers; and an understanding of County government. 

I feel "Protecting and Recording Your Family's 
. investment" is what the Recorder's Office is all about and 
Bob Neal is the person you can put your trust and confi- 
dence in to be in charge. 

Work experience: I started an electronic service compa- 
ny that grew to 27 employees, the third largest in the State 
of Illinois, until I voluntarily liquidated the service busi- 
ness in 1987. I served for six years as the 
Maintenance/Material Control Officer for my Navy 
Reserve squadron which flew two DC-9 airplanes all over 
the world. I taught a number of courses at the Notre Dame 
School of Service Management relating to constituent ser- 
vices. 

Volunteer, civic organizations: American Legion Post 
771, Wadsworth Lions Club (charter member and past 
president), Moose Club, Masonic Lodge 78, Medinah 
Shriners, Naval Enlisted Reserve Association, Naval 



Reserve Officers Association, Blue Jackets Association, 
Naval Order, Naval League. 

Previous: Jaycees, Exchange Club of Waukegan, Elks 
Club, Little Fort Lions Club, YMCA, Newport Township 
Volunteer Fire Dept., Newport Township Civic 
Association, United Way of Lake County. • 
Education: Warren Township High School, graduate 
U.S. Navy, graduate of University of Notre Dame School of 
Service Management and National Association of 
Recorders and Clerks' Certified Public Officials — Land 
Records Management Certification Credit, Recording and 
Lands Records Management Credit, Archival Preservation 
Certification Credit and Management Tier Certification 
Credit. 

Family: wife, Patricia; three daughters, two sons and four 
grandchildren. 

Mary Ellen Vanderventer, Democrat 

Most Important function of Recorder of Deeds: To 

provide prompt, professional and courteous service. 
Documents need to be accurately recorded and easily 
retrievable. My wish would be to continue in the same 
honorable fashion as Frank Nustra has done for the past 
36 years. Building public trust and ensuring accuracy are 
at the top of my list 

What changes would be made?: The Recorder of 
Deeds is responsible for recording and retrieving any doc- 
ument the public wants recorded. Most often the ofllce is 
used in real estate, recording property transactions. Each 
transaction represents real people who have purchased a 
home or property. 

One of my objectives is to generate increased revenue 
with an off-site, remote access program for banks, lawyers 
and title companies. These customers use the Recorder's 
office most often. Under my new program, they would be 
able to access needed information from link-ups in their 
offices rather than having to come into the Recorder's office 
on a daily basis. We would be able to create a network of 
information that reaches subscribers where they work. 

As Elections Administrator, one of the first things I did 
was to meet with the people who used the Clerk's office on 
a routine basis. I visited with Village, City and Township 
Clerks, School Superintendents, Park Districts, officials 
and clerks in other counties. This helped me to see the 
areas in the office that needed improvement or fine-tun- 
ing, as well as see first hand the policies and procedures 
that worked well. One of my biggest accomplishments 
was to initiate new procedures for recycling unused elec- 
tion materials. This, along with many other management 
plans, allowed us to reduce our overall budget for 8 con- 
secutive years. 

As Recorder of Deeds I would again promote open 
communication thrqugh a Users Advisory Council. I 
would want to meet routinely with the professionals who 




Vanderventer 



use the office on a daily basis to 
hear their suggestions and ideas. 
My goal has always been to pro- 
vide superior service. Meeting with 
key users of the Recorder's office is 
one way in determining the needs 
of the customers. 

Why are you the better candi- 
date?: The key issues in the race 
for Lake County Recorder of Deeds 
are the vast difference between my 
opponent and me, both profes- 
sionally and philosophically. From 
1985 to 1995, 1 managed the largest 
department in the Lake County Clerk's office . I super- 
vised operations for every local, state and national elec- 
tion. I prepared and managed a $1 million budget; coordi- 
nated over 3,000 volunteers and election judges for every 
election; managed a. full-time staff of 22 administrative 
and clerical personnel and was responsible for the daily 
administration of over 265,000 voter registration records. 
For 10 years, I ran the elections department under the 
watchful eye of the Lake County taxpayers, politicians and 
the press without mishap. 1 am proud of my record as 
Elections Administrator. As Recorder of Deeds, Vwill con- 
tinue to serve with the same non-partisan dedication and 
professionalism. I will bring to the Recorder's' office my 
experience in managing even the smallest details, while 
providing prompt and courteous service. 

My opponent and 1 could not be further apart in the 
way we approach public service. I held one job at a time 
and concentrated all my efforts on performing my duties 
within that position. My opponent has a long record of 
service, but his duties have often been mired in political 
patronage with questionable conflicts of interest. He has 
held as many as four taxpayer paid positions at once. He 
has been a director on the mismanaged, scandal ridden 
Tollway Authority since 1988. My opponent said he could 
not deny that he was running for Recorder to increase his 
government retirement pension. 
Work experience: 1985-1995, Lake County Elections 
Administrator; 1977-1985, First Midwest Bank branch 
office, last position — assistant manager. 
Volunteer, civic organizations: League of Women 
Voters, Women Interested in Government (WINGS), 
International Association of Clerks, Recorder, Election 
Officials and Treasurers; Stage Two Theatre Co. (found- 
ing member), Waukegan Community Players, St. 
Anastasia Women's Club, American Heart Association 
volunteer, 1996 co-chairman for Victory Hospital's 
Festival of Trees. 

Education: St. Anastasia School, Holy Child High School 
and Columbia College. 
Family: Married to Don Vanderventer Jr. 



Coffelt faces challenge from Jones for circuit court clerk 



Sally Coffelt, Republican 

Residence: Waukegan. 

Family: Mother of two boys, age 23 and 20. 

Civic groups: American Heart Walk in Lake County and 

St. Therese Medical Center Hospice. 

Government service: 16 years as 
clerk of the circuit court. 
Accomplishments; Establishing 
ah image information system for 
smalt claims, increasing accessibil- 
ity. Also, opening a branch court in 
Lakehurst shopping mall and a 
new juvenile detention facility in 
Vernon Hills, closing the Hulse 
House. 

Improving the computer capa- 
bilities of the traffic division, 

C ff e |t allowing more information about 




specific accident sites for municipal and individual use. 

Proud of track record for turning traffic ticket income 
to the municipalities. 

Management: Heads the office with a $3,259,000 budget 
and 1 10 full-time employees, with six temporaries. 
Goals: Upgrading the child support enforcement and pub- 
lic aide accounting system to meet new federal regulations. 
Staff morale: Thanked the more than 100 person staff for 
office's accomplishments in the past. 

Jackie Jones, Democrat 

Political experience: First time seeking elected office. Is 
a Wauconda Township precinct committeeman. 
Residence: Wauconda. 

Changes she would like to Implement: More aggres- 
sive collection of child support payments plus a fee for the 
clerk's office for handling those payments and publicly 
naming 'deadbeat' parents. Would like to see increased 



technology and better management practices. 

"The current clerk has not gotten the training for the 
staff nor developed management skills, " Jones said. She 
cites an external audit of the office paid for by the Lake 
County Board which recommends changes in policies on 
procedures for fund processes. 

She would also like to see more 
user-friendly brochures on how the 
office operates. 

Background: Has managed hun- 
dreds of retail stores with payroll 
responsibilities. Employed by 
Heritage Media's Act Media. 
Community involvement: 
Worked as Boy Scout Leader, active 
with Willow Creek Community 
Church. 

Family: divorced, two children, 
taking care of 73-year old father. 




ELECTION '96.UkElANd Newspapers NovEMbtn 1,1 996 







Link, Lachner face off in state senate race 



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Terry Link, Democrat 

Current status: Chairman of the 
Lake County Democratic Party. Link 
lives in Vernon Hills, manages a per- 
sonal business in Waukegan, and 
serves as a 



Link 



member of the 

College of Lake 

County 

Foundation 

Board. 

Education: 

Link said the 



The Dist. 30 state senate seat 

encompasses portions, of Vernon, 

Libertyville, Waukegan and 

Deerfield Townships as well as 

Shields and West Deerfield 

Townships. 



number one 
issue facing Illinois is the funding of education. If elected, Link 
pledges to work funding education adequately for all school 
districts including rural and cash-strapped districts. 

"Any proposal to reform the funding method must 
include real property tax relief, local control of schools, and 
measurable goals and high standards for students, teachers, 
and school boards.," Link said. 

Tollway: Link said he opposes the extension of Route 53 from 
Lake-Cook Road to Grayslake. ' 

"I believe that we should first improve our existing roads 
by widening, adding turn lanes, and making general improve- 
ments to our roadways," Link said. "I believe the expansion of Elementary and Secondary Education Committee, which is 
Route 53. will lead to over development in western Lake gathering testimony on how to establish future funding 



opportunities in those communities." . 
Riverboats: Link said gambling in Illinois is here to stay. He 
believes . if additional riverboats licenses are granted, 
Waukegan or North Chicago should bid for diem. He also 
supports increasing the share of revenue from the gaming 
industry for the state. 

"If new licenses are to be made avail- 
able, there should be a detailed econom- 
ic development and impact statements 
prepared and presented to the residents 
of those communities," Link said. 
Lake County gas tax: Link said he does 
not support special legislation for a Lake 
County gas tax. 

"The recent federal indictments 
of contractors within the road construction business under- 
scores the need for reform in the awarding of road construc- 
tion contracts," Link said. "The State of Illinois should ensure 
that waste, fraud, and corruption are rooted out before asking 
for additional funds." 

Thomas Lachner, Republican 

Current status: State Representative for District 59. Lachner 
lives in Lake Bluff, owns a personal business there and was a 
former school board president for Lake Bluff Dist. 65. 
Education: Lachner is currently a member of the House 




County." 

District priority: Link said the redevelopment of the busi- 
ness communities within' the 30th district, especially 
Waukegan and North Chicago, should take top priority. 

"Waukegan and North Chicago must be a priority," Link 
said. "I propose to bring state and local officials together to 
put in place the blueprints for creating new jobs and business 



mechanisms for education. 

Lachner said he supported the Governor's plan which 
would have increased income taxes with property tax relief for 
school funding. Lachner also sponsored legislation that 
would allow excellent schools to be exempted from state 
mandates. 

"I believe a statewide referendum is appropriate and 



should include specific funding 
choices," Lachner said. 

He added, "Education funding 
will be a top priority next year. We're 
going to change the way education is 
funded in Illinois." 

Spending: "I promised to fight 
against tax increases, to make gov- 
ernment smaller and less intrusive 
and to enact legislation that would 
give our law enforcement officials the 
tools they need to fight against gangs ^ 
and crime. In addition, I voted to bal- Lachner 
ance the state budget, to slash the 
growth in government spending and to cut the outstanding 
Medicaid debt," Lachner said. He added, "I believe the short- 
fall instate reimbursement that our area has experienced in 
the past is being reversed. I will continue to work hard on this 
endeavor." 

Tollway: Lachner said he supports the tollway extension of 
Route 53 from Lake-Cook Road to Grayslake as long as all 
environmental issues have been handled. On a related mat- 
ter, he said another concern is that the toll moneys be used as 
they were originally intended to be: To retire the bonds used 
to build the roads and for continuing maintenance. 
Riverboats: I would not support any expansion of riverboat 
gambling without a local referendum. I supported the gover- 
nor's proposal to increase the tax on gaming revenues in the 
Illinois House and will continue to support it in the Illinois 
Senate. 

Lake County gas tax: "I am against a gas tax at this time," 
Lachner said. 

County officials have proposed special legislation to allow 
Lake County to institute a gas tax to help fund its transporta- 
tion budget 



I * PHIL CRANE for CONGRESS * 

Rock Solid for Illinois 




* A Clear Voice for Illinois * 

Over the years, Phil Crane has been a solid voice for the 8th Congressional District 
and Illinois. Phil Crane has been fighting all his life to change Washington. He has 
fought to reduce the bloated bureaucracy, reduce taxes, and reduce government 
regulation. He has fought to keep government out of our daily lives. . 



Putting the 
Taxpayer First 



* Fighting for the Taxpayer * 

♦ Phil Crane has NEVER voted to 
increase your taxes. 

♦ Phil Crane supports a Constitu- 
tional Amendment to Balance the 
Budget and the Line Item Veto. 

♦ Phil Crane routinely receives major 
national awards: 

O National Taxpayers Union 
O Watchdogs of the Treasury 
O Citizens Against Government Waste 



♦ Returning Tax Dollars to Illinois * 

♦ Phil Crane spearheaded the successful, 
effort to reauthorize the Des Plaines 
River Wetlands Project; 

♦ Phil Crane obtained funding for new 
floodgates on the Fox River. 

♦ Phil Crane fought for funding for the 
Wisconsin Central Commuter Rail Line. 



* Fighting for Change * 

♦ Phil Crane voted for Anti-Crime legislation to provide more money for prisons and police. 

♦ Phil Crane is battling for mandatory sentences for crimes committed with guns. 

♦ Phil Crane voted for welfare reform, requiring work for those receiving welfare 

* Performance * 

Because Phil Crane is a leader in Congress he was named... 

♦ "Guardian of Senior Rights" by the Seniors Group 60/Plus 

♦ "Guardian of Small Business" by the National Federation of Independent Business 

* Perform ance -Not Promises * 

Paid for by Crane for Congress 1450 S.Wilke RdL Suite 101 Arlington Hts.il 60005 (847) 506-0252 





' 



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NovEMbER 1 1 1 996 UkelANd Newspapers COUNTY 





Clayton, Riebman 
face off in Dist. 51 

Verna Clayton, Republican 

Political service: 20 years in local government in 
Buffalo Grove, eight as village clerk, 12 as mayor. 
Finishing second term as state representative 
from District 51. Involved in many regional activi- 
ties while mayon president of Northwestern 
Municipal . Conference, president Illinois 
Municipal League, chairman of Chicago Area 
Transportation Study mayors, chairman of trans- 




Clayton 



portation commit- 
tee of National 
League of Cities. 
Community ser- 
vice: Very involved 
with homeowners' 
associations, 
Kingswood United 



The 5.1 st state 

house district ■ 

primarily includes 

Long Grove and 

Buffalo Grove 




schools, member 
Methodist Church, honorary member of 

Buffalo Grove Rotary Club, serves on board of directors for Buffalo Grove 
Chamber of Commerce, attends Lake Zurich Chamber of Commerce meet- 
ings and functions. Accepts as many invitations as she can and attends a 
meeting somewhere just about every day. . 

"It's very important to get out in the district, " said Clayton. "It's my way 
of being able to keep up with what's on everybody's mind." 
Occupation: Full-time legislator 

Biggest Issue In district: Taxes, followed closely by quality education, 
"the two things I always hear from people." Third is traffic congestion (sup- 
ports the extension of Rte. 53 and the efforts of the Corridor Planning 
Council), and right behind that, juvenile crime. 

Priority: "Next year we'll be tackling the distribution formula for schools. 
That has to be changed before we can tackle the entire question of taxes. It's 
a very complicated formula based on a community's ability to pay. 

"The area that I represent is fortunate. We receive very little state 
money through the formula, which is the reason our property taxes are so 
high. We have to fund the schools. People in the district want the very best 
in schools and are paying for It. 

M I recognize that the wealthier areas must subsidize poorer areas, but 
my concern is to what extent. It's going to be the biggest challenge in this 
next year. It's really a geographic issue, not a partisan one." 

flyman Riebman, Democrat 

Political service: Buffalo Grove Appearance' 
Review Committee; serving as treasurer, 
Northwest Suburban Bar Association; former 
chairman, Chicago Bar Association Traffic Laws 
Committee 

Community service: Served on board of direc- 
tors for Northwest Junior Chamber of Commerce 
biggest Issues in district: The level of commit- 
ment by Rep, Clayton, who announced her retire- 
ment, then got back in the race to defeat Mike Salvi 
in the primary. 

"I felt she didn't envision the same commit- 
ment I did. The district deserves a candidate who 
is dedicated and committed to the community for the future, someone who 
is independent and not tied or carrying any baggage to either political 
party." 

Opposed to the extension of Route 53 because of economic and envi- 
ronmental problems. Feels the road is unnecessary with another tollway 
only 4 miles away. The widening of east-west roads may ease the problem, 
and commuter rail "should be given a chance." 

Priorities: Proponent of reducing BAC legal limit to .08; first suggested as 
chairman of traffic committee. 

"The legislature has not done that yet" 

Proponent of "reasonable gun control" to keep guns out of the hands of 
people with criminal records and from juveniles. 

"The second amendment does not extend to allow people to carry con- 
cealed weapons like the Wild West; most murders take place between 
friends and family members." 

Supports initiatives that allow flexibility in schools. In favor of legisla- 
tion to allow charter schools by which districts can waive state mandates. 



McHenry County voters to 
decide on representatives 

Also facing voters on the ballot in McHenry County are three races- 
for the 16th U.S. congressional district, the 63rd representative district 
and the 64th representative district. 

Incumbent Republican Congressman Donald Manzulio is being 
challenged by Catherine M. Lee, a democrat in the race for the 16th 
congressional district. ' - . 

Republican Ann Hughes of the 63rd state representative district is 

being challenged by James Kappile. 

Republican Cal Skinner Jr., incumbent in the 64th state representa- 
tive district is being challenged by Joseph H. Pawalowski. 



Riebman 




a 



Vote for the Person, 
Not Just the Party/' 

Join Republicans, 
Democrats and 
Independents on 
November 5th to . 
Elect a FULL-TIME 
Recorder with 10 Years 
Proven Experience 
as Lake County's 
Elections Administrator. 

Turn the Ballot Page, 

Find the Recorder's Race 

and Punch #89. 



DEMOCRAT MARY ELLEN (DURKIN) 

Vanderventer 

For Recorder of Deeds 



NOV. 5TH ELECT 

Sally D. 



1 




Coffelt 




Jbr_ 




Sally D. 



Coffelt 




jvr_ 




CLERK OF THE 

CIRCUIT COURT 

VOTE 

FOR SALLY! 



CLERK OF THE 

CIRCUIT COURT 

EFFECTIVE PERFORMANCE: 

• Sally D. Coffelt used Automation Fees to save Lake 
County taxpayers $1.8 million dollars 

• Sally D. Coffelt promptly distributes revenues to all 
state and local agencies 

• Sally D. Coffelt makes customer satisfaction and * 
accurate information priorities of her administration 

• Sally D. Coffelt plans for the future with innovative 
solutions and fiscal responsibility 

EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONAL: 

• 16 years as Lake County Circuit Clerk 

• President, Illinois Association of Court Clerks, 
1993-94 

• Member Lake County Police Chiefs Association 

• National Association of Court Managers 

• Member advisory committees of the Illinois 
Supreme Court 

Vote for the woman with proven ability. 
RE-ELECT SALLY D. COFFELT 




Paid for by Uie Committee to Re-elect Sally Coffelt. A copy of our report will be on file with the County Clerk of Lake County. 







J ELECTION '96 LaIceIancI Newspapers Novemdeii 1, 1996 




Beaubien faces Boness in Dist. 52 state rep race 



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The Dist. 52 state house 
district encompasses ' 
central and western Lake 
County. 



Beaubien 



Mark H. Beaubien, Republican 

Elected positions: Former com- 
missioner on the Lake County Board 
and a past precinct committeeman. 
Serving first term as supervisor of Cuba 
Townsliip and appointed Oct 22 to 
State Legislature in the 52nd District 
Build Rte. 537: 
Yes, it should be. 
It is already a 
fact that Rte. 53 
is going to be 
built. A great 
deal of time and 
money has been 
spent on the matter. As far as the state legislature is con- 
cerned, the issue has already passed. Now, the matter is sim- 
ply in handling the details of building the route. It will not be 
an issue before the Illinois Legislature. 
Traffic solutions: Traffic solutions are in the pipeline years 
before they are ever implemented. Plans for the widening of 
Rte. 22 have been in the works for 35 to 40 years. I support the 
widening of Rte. 22 but it won't happen in six years. The leg- 
islator that goes down diere will not be the savior of the road 
plan. The state and county have 5-10-20 year plans. Money 
is the real issue and taxpayers would have to approve more 
money via a bond issue. 

Adequate education funding?: I have been very careful 
on this subject to talk to a lot of educators. It is not adequate, 
and there is a need to direct funding to districts like Round 
Lake as was done for years in Chicago. 
Eliminate property tax?: That is part of the overall debate 
that will be going on, but that is not necessarily a possibility. 
It is easy and popular for a candidate to call for elimination of 



property tax, but that doesn't solve the funding issue. 
Keep tax cap?: Yes, it seems to have the effect of slowing 
down the growth of expenditure. However, the result is local 
taxing bodies have done a lot of playing with the numbers on 
tax rates to ensure they receive as many tax dollars as possi- 
ble. The tax cap should be kept in place, but it should be care- 
fully monitored for abuse and change of circumstances. 
Term limits: I will serve no more than three terms. Voters 
should encourage term limits. 
Biggest Issue: The ongoing process of fiscal 
oversight and management of public funds. 
The federal government passes programs 
down to the state and the state passes pro- 
grams down to the local level. We are going to 
have to deal with because as the economy 
grows, revenue grows. We need to get rid of unnecessary reg- 
ulations. Other top legislative goals focus on public safety, 
welfare reform, education funding, open space for drainage 
purposes, transportation and maintaining a strong economy. 
Goals: To make sure every program sent down from the top 
has adequate funding and adequate flexibility. If you have 
two truckloads of regulations with every program, then you 
haven't changed anything. 

Robert Boness , Democrat 

Elected positions: 1 currently serve as a board members of 
the Round Lake Unit School District 116. I am the vice-presi- 
dent of the Board of Education, and have also served as chair- 
man of the school district's Finance Committee, 

I have also served in the following elected or appointed 
positions: Trustee, president and secretary/ clerk on the Round 
Lake Sanitary District. Democratic and Republican precinct 
committeeman, Avon Township Chairman. Commission-er- 
on the Round Lake Beach Planning and Zoning Commission. 




Boness 



Vice-commissioner, league president, 
team coach and manager for Avon 
Township Baseball . 

Build Rte. 53? and traffic 
solutions: Route 53 'extension 
should not be built now, 

* Tax money (Motor Fuel Taxes) 
would be better spent on improving 
existing roadways. Widen major 
intersections, install additional lanes 
and turning lanes, modernize traffic 
controls and signals on Routes 45, 83, 
59, 60, and 21 before sending $1 bil- 
lion on a new tollway. 

Current east-west roadways cannot handle the increased 
demands. Although an environmental impact study has been 
performed there has been no economic impact study of cur- 
rent businesses located along existing roadways, such as lost 
business from changing traffic patterns. 
Adequate education funding?: I do not believe state fund- 
ing of education is adequate or equitable. There are large dis- 
parities in the amount of funds available from school district 
to district. The quality of education opportunities a child 
receives is decided by the wealth of the school district in 
which he lives. Is this fair? 

Eliminate property tax?: No. Keep tax cap?: The 5 per- 
cent tax cap should stay in effect but should be modified. 
Term limits: Voters currently have control oyer the limits. 
They can vote the bums out! If a representative is acting to the 
electorate's satisfaction, why limit the time they can serve? 
Biggest Issue and goals: The biggest issue facing Illinois is 
adequate and equitable funding of education. This is my 
main goal for seeing public office. 1 will work for educational 
funding reforms. 



BETTER TEAM 

A Better Lake County 




Al Salvi 

U.S. Senate 



Recorder of Deeds 

■II: 



Sally D. Coffelt 

Circuit Court Clerk 



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Vernm 



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SMHB 



Markhi. 




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.IL Hbuse^Si bistro 



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Lake County Board 

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Stevei&6ri$ountsief l Robert \L Grever 



Th6ms6h£arter 

District #5 " . 

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Bob Dole & Jack Kemp 

PU, U.S. President and Vice President jpj 



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WM&BmMs^" %-i * * * Please Vote YES* * * 

•;< >- ,J. On ALL Judicial Retentions 



7 *V - 



Jarie Drew Walter 






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Judee of the Circuit Court - Scat A Judge of the Circuit Coiut ^Sea^^^v^ 

For Lake County's mitite 




Paid for by the Lake County Republican Central Committee 



• 



NovEMbERl, 1996 UkEJANd Newspapers ELECTION '96 




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e I Churchill, Molinaro face off in Dist. 62 state race 




Churchill 



Robert W. Churchill, 
Republican 

Political 
services- 
He has 
spent 14 
years in 
the. state' 
legislature 
an d 
served for 
two years 
prior to 
that as a 
Lake Villa . 
Township 
Trustee. 
For the last nine years he has 
served in a leadership role in the 
legislature working up to his cur- 
rent post of Majority Leader. 
Build Route 53? "Yes. I've sup- 
ported the extension since I was 
first in office. I think we're reach- 
ing the point of grid lock on 
roads in southern Lake County. 
We need high speed, efficient 
and effective roads so traffic can 
move in and • around Lake 
County." 

Traffic solutions: "It's very 
tough to lay down a new road. 
After 53 or at some point we need 
to improve the local arterial 
roads, Solutions he promoted are 

coordinated traffic lights to allow 
smooth traffic flow and a contin- 
ued working relationship 
between the legislature and the 
Illinois Department of 

Transportation. 

Adequate "education fund- 
ing? "I don't like the state aid 
formula. It discriminates against 
people in the suburbs and collar 
counties." In regards to property 
•tax funding he noted there are 
benefits to the system. He 
explained it keeps the dollar 
close to home, for every dollar 
sent to Springfield the district 
gets a dollar back and if the sys- 
tem were changed he noted 
you'd need a powerful legislator 
to fight for your appropriations. 
Eliminate property tax? I 
think we should put several 
options on a referendum and let 
the voters decide. It's the taxpay- 
ers money..." 

Keep tax cap? "Absolutely." 
Because tax bills have gone up 3- 
9 percent with the tax cap and 
prior to the tax cap they were 
going up 18-24 percent, he 
noted. 

Term limits? "No. There are 
very powerful influences in 
Springfield." He mentioned 
among them the lobbyists, 
media, unions and the bureau- 
cracy. "No 20 year bureaucrat 
will listen to a freshman repre- 
sentative." He believes the fresh- 
man legislators wouldn't have 
the experience to stand up to the 
bureaucrats and do what the 
constituents want.. 
Biggest Issue "How we fund 
education." He noted the 
Republicans have made it their 
priority to solve problems of the 
educational system in Illinois. 
Among them were the 1995 
reform of the Chicago school sys- 
tem. The 1996 priority was the 
Quality First program which 



makes sure students meet stan- 
dards for grade levels and the pri- 
ority will be education funding in 
the next session. 
Goals? "I want to have a voice in 
the education funding debate to 
make sure the schools in my area 
end up winners." He also men- 
tioned workers compensation 
and unemployment reforms to 
alleviate abuses of the system. 
"Number one is the continued 
managing of the states financial, 
condition." 

Phase out the Illinois Toll 
Highway Authority? I support 
the toll highway authority. Its a 
separate government entity not 
connected to the state that runs 
the most efficient and well main- 
tained highway system in Illinois. 
The proof is the number of cars 
that use it daily." 
More rlverboat gambling 
licenses? "No." 

How to reduce crime: "First 
we could pass a bonding bill to 
provide more money for pris- 
ons." He mentioned the 
Democrats killed the bill. Other 
steps he mentioned included 
getting a handle on the drug situ- 
ation and possibly increasing 
funding from the state as well as 
working closer with local law 
agencies to solve the drug prob- 
lem which he said is pervasive 
throughout the state. "We're 
fighting a loosing battle. We can't . 
.stop drugs from coming into the 
state." He mentioned possibly 
analyzing current punishments 
for drug law offenders and 
toughening laws as a solution. 

Ronald L. Molinaro 
III, Democrat 

Political service: "I've held no 
elected positions." At 18 he 
became involved as a commit- 
teeman, is currently committee- 
man of Zion precinct 374 and is 
Vice Chairman of the Lake 
County Democratic Party. He 
also served in the 1992 
Clinton/Core campaign as the 
Lake County Volunteer 
Coordinator. 

Build Route 53? "I'm not in 
favor of it. It's too costly and will 
create more development along 
the corridor. How will we pay for 
all the things that go along with 
development?" 

Traffic solutions? "Lets fix 
some of the infrastructure before 
starting another road." He favors 
widening Routes 45 and 83 and 
improving arterial roads to solve 
the problems of traffic conges- 
tion. 

Adequate education fund- 
ing? "Definitely not." 
Eliminate property tax fund- 
ing? "I'm in favor of shifting to 
income tax funding. It would be 
more equitable. With property 
tax funding I see us chasing a lot 
of seniors out of their homes." 
Keep tax cap? "I believe the tax 
cap should stay in effect." He 
believes we have to go to Income 
tax funding for education in 
order to keep the tax cap in place. 
Term limits? "I'm in favor of 
limits all the way around. 
Probably in the house five terms. 



In ten years you should be able to 
make a. difference. Politics 
shouldn't be a career move." 
Biggest issue? "Its got to be 
education 



funding." 
Believes issue 
can be solved 
" T hrough 
education 
funding 
reform shift- 



The 62 nd/stale house district r 

primarily consist of northern Lake 

.County from the state line south to: 

the Grant,; Avohand Warren . 

twp. boundaries 



ing the fund- 
ing to income tax based rather 
than property tax funding." 
Top priority? His number one 
objective and top priority is to 
see education funding 
addressed. He explained the 
state has to keep its educational 
system quality up to ensure a 



quality workforce that will allow 
business expansion to thrive in 
the state. . 

Phase' out the Illinois Toll 

Highway 
Authority? 
In a perfect 
world yes, 
but now the 
state is so 
strapped for 
cash. I think 
we could cut 
down the bureaucracy." He 
noted the current system seems 
to be one of patronage rather 
than of employment of field 
experts. 

More rlverboat gambling 
licenses? "I think they should 
expand. Personally I think it 



should be done by referendum." 
His view on this is in a home rule 
municipality such as Waukegan 
the issue should be decided by 
the governing body, but in 
municipalities such as Zion 
where councilman are elected 
city-wide the issue should be 
decided by referendum. He is in 
favor of, a license for Waukegan, 
but noted some limits should be 
instituted on a case by case basis 
in awarding licenses. 
How to reduce crime; "I think 
through education we need to 
give kids the moral values they're 
not getting at home. I know the 
current administration is trying 
to reduce it (crime), but I don't 
think anyone really knows what 
the answer is." 




Qualified • Experienced . Dedicated 





Ybu 



"Protecting 
and Recording 
Your Family ] s 
Investment!" 





ECcct 

Robert P. Neal 

REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE 

Recorder of 




~*r-*~ »-. 






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TT~.- 




ELECTION '96 UkeU^d Newspapers NovtMbi-R T, 1996 




Sixteen of 23 county board seats up for grabs 



. There are 16 members of the Lake County board 
whose seats are up for election in 1996. 

The following are facing no opposition in the general 
election: 

Dlst 5- Fox Lake/Wauconda- GOP candidate Bonnie 
Thomson Carter has no. Democrat challenger. 

DlsL 7- Warren Township, Gurnee- GOP candidate 
Alan Westerman faces no Democrat challenger. 

Dlst. II- Grayslake area- Republican candidate Sandy 
Cole faces no Democrat challenger. 

Dlst 13- Libertyville area- Republican John Schulien 
faces no challenger. 

Dlst. 14- Lake Bluff- Republican Mary Beattie faces no 



challenge. 

Dlst. 17- Wauconda/Barrington area- Republican 
Stevenson Mountsier faces no challenger. 

Dlst. 19- Lake Zurich area- Republican Robert Grever 
faces no challenger. 

Dlst. 20- Long .Grove/Buffalo Grove- Republican 
David Stolman faces no challenger. 

The following races are contested but not within the 
Lakeland Newspapers' coverage area: 

Dlst. 4- Zion area- Incumbent Republican James 
LaBelle is being challenged by real estate agent Mamie 
McNutt. 

Dlst. 9- Waukegan- Incumbent Democrat and County 



Board Vice Chairman Debra Halas is being challenged 
again by Henry "Jeff' Jeffers. 

Dlst. 12- North Chicago- Incumbent Democrat 
Angelo Kyle is being challenged by Republican Walter 
White. 

Dlst 22- Highland Park- Democrat Carol Spielman 
faces a challenge from Republican Deloris Axelrod, a for- 
mer county board member. 

Dlst. 23- Highland Park-Democrat Robert Buhai faces 
challenger Republican Martin Jantzen. ' 

The remaining races are profiled below. Each 
candidate was asked the same questions on the 
issues. 



Frayer challenges incumbent Schmidt for Dist. 3 seat 



Suzi Schmidt, Republican 

Political service: Lake Villa 
Township Trustee 1985-88, County 
Board Representative 1988-present 
Community service: Illinois 
Lakes Management Association, 
Friends of Lake Villa District 
Library, Friends of Cedar Lake, 
Lindenhurst/ Lake Villa Chamber of 
Commerce, volunteer Round Lake 
Area Snowflake, Lakes Area Kiwanis 
and Lake County election judge.- . 
Forest Preserve role: "The role is 
to provide preservation, restoration 
and education to residents. v 

Biggest issue in District: Development. "It affects our 
schools, our roads and our quality of life. " 
Biggest county issue: Again development: "It always 
costs the taxpayers. It is the biggest issue, it always is." ■ 
Working with municipalities: Feels it is important to 
work with each area, suggests offering county planning ser- 
vices to help villages manage growth. She has worked with 




Lindenhurst to lower density of County Place subdivision, Biggest County Issue; She feels crime is the biggest issue, 
with Lake Villa to acquire additional Forest Preserve land "We have got to get more police 




Schmidt 



and with Round Lake Beach and Round 
Lake Heights to obtain grants to alleviate 
flooding problems. 

"Round Lake Beach is using the county 
to assist their planning. The county has a 
lot of maps. and information. Hopefully 
they can tap some of the county 
resources." 

Occupation: Schmidt's only job is work- 
ing as the district's representative, 

Joyce Frayer, Independent 



Political service: Lake Villa Village trustee 1979-1981, 

Lake Villa mayor 1981-1993, planning board, village trustee 

again 1995-present. 

Community service: CCD teacher, volunteer for Lake 

Villa Elementary District. 

Forest Preserve Role: Her concern is not with the Forest 

Preserve, but with managing growth. 

"I'm more concerned with sewers, roads and streets." 



ELECTION '96 



officers." 

Top District priority: 

She believes the most 
important issue is 
improving transporta- 
tion and traffic flow. 
Feels more rail service 
could alleviate traffic 
congestion. She painted 
to the North - Central 
Service Line as a success- 
fully alternative. 
"If anyone wants to put in an 
additional line we should be doing it," Frayer said 
Working with municipalities; Asserts county board rep- 
resentative ought to represent each municipality the wav 
each municipality-wants the representative to help them 

"Each community is different. We should be doing Oytvm 
each village wants us to do if it is not detrimental to the 
county." 
Occupation: Only job is a village trustee. 




Frayer 



Leafblad faces Democrat challenger Murphy 




Leafblad 



Larry Leafblad, Republican 

Elected positions previously 
held: Lake County board mem- 
ber since 1990 and liaison to 
Third Lake for Lake County 
Board. 

Community Service: 

Chairman Avon Township 
Republican Central Committee 
covering 42-precincts in Avon 
Township; member of home- 
owners association for Highland 
Lake; Round Lake Lakes 
Management member; volunteer 
for Northern Illinois Council Against Substance Abuse. 
Forest Preserve role:. "I think we should buy every 
inch of open land in Lake County and preserve it." As 
Forest Preserve commissioner, Leafblad feels his mis- 
sion is to help "Preserve, restore, educate and recre- 
ate." 

Biggest County issue: "Growth, period. There is no 
other issue," Leafblad said. "Every other issue can find 
it's roots to over- development and open growth." 
Top Priority for the district: Again, growth in Lake 
County comes to mind as the top priority for his dis- 
trict. Leafblad said he doesn't think as if he's working 
with just a section, but "My district is Lake County." 
Work with local municipalities: "It's important 
that villages and county government work with each 
other." He explained the villages actually have the bulk 
of the power within the county. 
Occupation: National training director for Excel 
Communications, a telecommunication company in 
long distance and paging. His background entails 25- 
years in radio management. 

Dennis Murphy,Democrat 

Elected positions previously held: Presently, he is 
a trustee for the Village of Third Lake, in his fourth 
year. He was appointed to fill the remainder of a 
trustees position and then he was elected into office for 



a two-year term. Murphy is also secretary of the Avon Biggest County Issue: Uncontrolled growth. "The 
Township Democratic Party. He is a precinct commit- [countyl board needs to do something about it. They 



teeman for Avon Township. 
Community Service: Murphy is past 
president and is a current member of the 
Chicago Herpetologfcal Society, an envi- 
ronmental group which focuses op sav- 
ing lives of wildlife and certain plant 
species. He was formerly involved with 
the United States Boy Scout organization. 
Forest Preserve role: "I think the for- 
est preserve district should be as active as 
they used to be in acquiring land." 
Murphy noted former county board 
member Mike -Graham did a good job at 




ELECTION '96 



need to work with municipalities in an 
effort to slow it down." 
Top Priority for the district: The same 
as the county issue — over development and 
rapid growth. "The reason it's so important 
is my area is suffering from uncontrollable 
growth." Murphy promises to keep this 
issue a priority if elected. 
Work with local municipalities: 
"(Countyl board members need to stay in 
touch with the municipalities including 
keeping informed on district issues and 
community needs." 



this, several years ago. "We need more passive and Occupation: Murphy is a data processor for a large 
active forest preserve space in Lake County." beer and spirits company. 

Marks, Wilder face off in county board race 



Incumbent Martha Marks is 
facing a challenge from 
Democrat Pat Wilder for her seat 
representing county board dis- 
trict 21. 

Wilder, a 22-year-resident of 
Lincolnshire. is running "as your 
district representative." Wilder 
believes communication with 
constituents and other govern- 
mental bodies is the key to man- 
aged growth and good govern- 
ment. 

Marks is runningon a contin- 
uation of her 1992 platform in which she promised to: 

• control property taxes by controlling high density 
development 

• to save whenever possible high-quality wood- 
lands, wetlands and floodplains in order to maintain 
the natural beauty of Lake County and prevent flooding 

• to work to preserve the quality of life in Lake 







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County 

Marks says her record shows she has kept these 
promises and will continue to fight for these issues. 

Wilder, has served on the Stevenson High School 
Board for seven years, is a strong advocate of drug and 
alcohol abuse prevention programs and a student vol- 
unteer. She is Stevenson High School's board repre- 
sentative to Lincolnshire Plan Commission and has 
been actively involved in community government. 

"I believe that my experience as a school board 
member for 17 Lake County communities and my 
active involvement in local issues has given me an 
encompassing perspective on how government affects 
our lives... open channels of communication are the 
key to good government. I known firsthand the benefits 
of building relationships through a positive atmos- 
phere and mutual respect for colleagues," Wilder said 
in a prepared statement. 

"I promised to go to bat for , to do everything in my 
power to keep our area lovely and livable, And I have,' 
said Marks. 








NovEMbER 1, 1996 UkElANd Newspapers. CLASSIFIED 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



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Newspaper^ 

FuneraL DiRECTORV 





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JUSTENS ROUND LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

222 N. Rosedale Ct, Round Lake ;■ 
(847) 546-3300 
• Jeffrey Jordan, Manager/Director 
Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

GEORGE R. JUSTEN & SON FUNERAL HOME 

3519 W. Elm St., McHenry IL 

(815)385-2400 
Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

i 

JUSTENS WONDER LAKE 
FUNERAL HOME 

7611 Hancock Dr., Wonder Lake 

(815) 728-0233 

Mark Justen, Owner/Director 

RINGA FUNERAL HOME 

122 S. Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 
1 (847)356-2146 
Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 

STRANG FUNERAL CHAPEL, LTD. 
AND CREMATORIUM ' 

410 E. BeMdere Grayslake, IL 

(847)223-8122 

David G. Strang and 

Richard A Gaddis, Director 

STRANG FUNERAL HOME 

1055 Main St., Antioch, IL 

Dan Dugenske, Director 

(847) 395-4000 



Griefiwtesi 

How can I prevent 
difficulties from grief? 

Many who confront grief for the first time are surprised atl 
Ithe intensity of their feelings. Grief is most often associated! 
with the death of a loved one but is can also result froml 
divorce, loss of bodily function, moving or from child grow- 
ing up and leaving home. Because grief is poorly understood,! 
those who have not experienced it personally can be poor! 
helpers. By learning about grief ahead of time we can more[ 
capably assist friends in their time of need and can more read- 
ily understand the intensity of feelings when death affects ourl 
families. Take time to read and inquire about grief and learn| 
I ways to assist those in need of support. 

%.% ttamsfier 

funeraC&iome Ltd. 




12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 

<[fie CfiapeCon the Lafg" 

Serving* Qfou J2Lnt/time , . . J?lTiyzufu>re. 

Phone: (847) 587-2100 • (615) 385-1001 



J: 



rDEATh Notices 



BURNETT 

Hellen Burnett, age 83 of Vernon Hills 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Libertyville 

COPPI 

Laura Cop pi, age 73 formerly of Libertyville 
Arr: McMurrough Chapel, Libertyville - 

OTIS 

Eleanor Otis, age 84 of Libertyville 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, Libertyville 

DRASSLER 

Anna Drassler, ige 88 of Libertyville 
Arr: McMurrough Chapel, Libertyville 



RECK 

William Reck, age 17 of Lake Villa 

Arr: Kristan Funeral Home, PC, Mundeleln 

cum 

Richard Critz, age 82 of Round Lake 

Arr: Burnett-Dane Funeral Home, libertyville 

HILL 

Richard Hill, age 70, formerly of Ingleslde 
Arr: Service of remembrance at a later date. 



Kathleen Sipolt 

Age 50 of Inglcside , passed away October 28, 1996 
at Condell Memorial Hospital, Libertyville. She was 
born in Ghicago.October 4, 1946. She was a member of 
the St. Bede Catholic Church, Ingleside. 

Survivors include, her husband Richard Sipolt; 3 
children Melissa Sipolt, Jennifer Sipolt and Matthew 
Sipolt; her mother Grace Reich; 1 sister Francine 
(Edward) Reich; father and mother-in-law Imil (Casey) 
Sipolt; brother-in-law Thomas (Joyce) Sipolt, Timothy 
(Debra) Sipolt. She was preceded in death by her father 
Frank VanGeertruy. 

Arrangements were made by K. K. Hamshcr 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake 

Interment was at Grant Cemetery, Ingleside. 

Donations may be made to a Memorial in her 
name. 

Christine Barzowski 

Age 24, of Round Lake Park, passed away at her 
home. She was born September 13, 1972 to Ralph and 
Sheila (nee Geiger)) Barzowski She attended Round 
Lake Community School, Round Lake. She had worked 
as a waitress in the Round Lake area. 

She is survived by her. mother Sheila Geiger- 
Barzowski; her father Ralph Barzowski; 1 sister Kath 
(Abel) Jacobo; a nephew Brandon Jacobo; grandmother 
Velma (Robert) Ritchey; many aunts, uncles and 
cousins. She was preceded in death by grandparents 
Frank Geiger, Henry Barzowski and Lillian Cholewin. 

Services were held with Fr. Francisco Cuevas offici- 
ating. Arrangements were made by Justen's Round 
Lake Funeral Home, Round Lake 

Interment was at Avon Centre Cemetery, 
Grayslake. 

Memorials may be made to the Juvenile Diabetes 
Foundation, 70 W. Hubbard, Chicago, IL, 60610. 



^ 



Strang Junerat Chapd, Ltd. 
& Crematorium ishiSSsMms I 




"WE CARE" 

410 £. ftetvidere %oa£ 
Qraystafg, IL 60030 

847-223-8 12Z 

David G. Strang-Richard A. Gaddis 

VHXECTOtRS 



Norman Szamlewski 

Age 57 of McHenry, passed away at home. He was . 
born April 18, 1939, the son of Albert and Genevieve 
(Szymura) Szamlewskl. He was employed by the VFW 
Post 4600 and a subcontractor for Flame and Hearth. 

He is survived by his wife, GaU, sons Richard (mar- 
ilyn), Michael (Lynne), Jeffrey (Lori), Scott (Sandy); a 
daughter Karen (Brett) Everett; 10 grandchildren; a sis- 
ter Elaine (James) MisloskJ; brothers Robert, James 
(Marie) and Donald (Betty); mother-in-law Genevieve 
Dahl and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded 
In death by his parents and a grandchild Krystyne 
Szamlewskl. 

' Services were held with Fr. Robert Sherry official- a 
ing. 

Arrangements were made by George Justen & Son 
Funeral Home, Mc Henry 

Interment was atWlndridge Memorial Park, Cary 

Helen Manks (nee Dankowski) 

Age 83 , formerly of Chicago, passed away October 
23, 1996 at her home. She was born April 25, 1913 to 
Casper and Julia (nee MUculewica) Dankowski. She was 
a former employee of Modine Manufacturing, 
Ringwood and a member of SL Bede's Catholic Church, 
Ingleside. She also helped deliver Meals for Cahtolic 
Charities in Fox Lake and Ingleside. 

She is survived by daughters Sandra (James) 
Thompson, Pamela (LeRoy) Lejeune; grandaughters 
Kim (Jim) Werner, Lisa (David) Cummings, Karyn 
(Tom) Miller, Cheri Lejeune, Kelly Lejeune and Amy 
Lejeune; a great grand daughter and 4 great grandsons; 
as well as 2 brothers and 2 sisters. 

Services were held at St. Bede's Catholic Church, 
Ingleside. Arrangements were made by K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery, Libertyville. 

Memorials may be made to Centegra Home Health 
Care Nurses or the Cancer Care Fund; c/o NIMC 
Foundation; 4201 Medical Center Dr., Mc Henry, IL 
60050 

Paul GappitelU 

Age 74, of Lake Villa, passed away October 22, 1996 
at Condell Hospital, Libertyville. He was born February 
22, 1922 to Philip and Katie (nee Kirst) Cappltelll and 
was a veteran of the U.S. Army during WWII. He was a 
carpenter by trade and a member of the Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners Union. He was a member of the 
Fox Lake American Legion, Post 703 . He was instru- 
mental in the building of Good Shepherd Lutheran 
Church, Lake Villa. 

Survivors include his wife, Mary (nee Butts) 
Cappitelli; sons John Cappitelll, Paul (Regina) 
Cappitelli and Phillip (Debbie) Cappitelli; daughters 
Susan Andrews, Marianne Cappitelli;.8 grandchildren; 
a brother Philip (Josephine) Cappitelli; sisters Rose 
Grauman and Gloria Graves. He was preceded in death 
by his parents and two brothers Frank and John. 

Services were held with Rev. John Zellmer officiat- 
ing. Arrangements were made by K. K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake. 

Niels Frandsen 

Age 75 of Grayslake, passed away October 25 at The 
VA Hospital, Wood, Wisconsin. He was born September 
14, 1921 in Sulsted, Denmark and was a veteran of 
WWII serving with the U.S. Navy and a member of 
Rising Sun Lodge 1 15 AF and AM Grayslake. Also was a 
member of the United Protestant Church, Grayslake. 
He and his brother owned Frandsen Tool 
Manufacturing Co., Grayslake. 

He is survived byhis wife Marie (nee Hoff), daugh- 
ters Jane Dove, Karen Kastens, Gayle (Mick) Gilliland; 7 
grandchildren; one great grandchild, one brother 
Henning (Thelma); two sisters Katherine DeMuro and 
Marion (Roy) Blair. He was preceded in death by his sis- 
ter Dorothy Patterson and brother Paul Frandsen. 

Services were held with Rev. Judith Wang of the 
United Protestant Church, Grayslake, officiating. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park 
Cemetery, Libertyville 

Contributions may be made to the United 
Protestant Church in his memory. 

Leona 'Lee' (nee piotrowski) Uhlemann 

Age 84 of Grayslake, passed away October 29, 1996 
at the Condell Medical Center, Libertyville. She was 
born January 8, 1912. 

She is survived by her husband Walter; 2 sisters 
Eleanore Alt, Bernice (Barney) Vukelich; 2 brothers 
Elmer Peters and Clarence (LaVerne) Peters. Also sur- 
viving are many nieces and nephews. 

Services were held with Rev. Lisle Kauffman from 
the Calvary Presbyterian Church, Round Lake, officiat- 
ing. 

Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral 
Chapel and Crematorium, Ltd., Grayslake. 

Interment was at Highland Memorial Park 
Cemetery, Libertyville. 



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I BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkEUwd Newspapers November 1, 1996 




LEGAL NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
WARREN TOWNSHIP 

Notice is hereby given that sealed proposals will be received 
at the office of Town Clerk at 17601 West Washington Street, 
Gurnee, Illinois, 60031 until 8:00 o'clock, A.M., on November 12, 
1996 for furnishing of the following material: 

One (1) New 1996 Backhoe-Loader 
Turbo Charged, Four Wheel Drive w/Cab & Extond-a-Hoo 
Ford 575 E or approved equal 
Proposals shall be made on forms furnished by the Township 
Highway Commissioner, and shall be addressed In a sealed enve- 
lope to Warren Township Highway Department, c/o James 
Sammon, Town Clerk and shall be marked "Material Proposal- 
Letting of November 12, 1996 (8:00 A.M.) Warren Township". 
Further Information regarding the letting may be obtained by con- 
tacting the Highway Commissioner at (847) 244-1101. The 
Township In accordance with the laws of the State of Illinois here- 
by notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively Insure that the con- 
tract entered into pursuant to this advertisement will be awarded 
to the lowest responsible bidder without discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or national origin. 

By order of Gerald E. Rudd 

Warren Township Highway Commissioner 

1196A-379-GEN 

November 1, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER 
FILEN0.28S51 
IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
GMAC Mortgage Corporation of PA, 
Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Cole Taylor Bank as T/U/T #94-6077, Mary 
Ried and Midland Savings Bank, FSB 
Defendanls. 

Case No. 96 C 031 1 
Judge Bucklo 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 28651 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
.THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLO- 
SURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on May 31, 1996. 

We, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special 
Commissioner for this court will on November 20, 1996 at the 
hour of 1 :30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Courthouso, 18 
N. County St., Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: 

Lot 1 in Oak Grove Subdivision, being a Subdivision ol Part of 
the South Half of the South Half of Section 27, Township 43 North, 
Range 12, East ol the Third Principal Meridian, According to the 
Plat Thereof, Recorded April 15, 1925 as Document 255540, in 
Book "N" of Plats, Page 83, In Lake County, Illinois. 
c/k/a 1567 Grove, Highland Park, IL 60035- 
Tax \DU 16-27-401-014 

The Improvements on the properly consist of a two story, 
wood frame, single family dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sate shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open tor Inspection, 
The Judgment amount was $199,649.90. ' 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will enable the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 
For Information, call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4764 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is Dili required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 

fsl Thomas Johnson 

Special Commissioner 

1096B-326-VH 

October 11, 1996 

October 18, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 



PUBUC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER 
FILE NO, 29073 
INTHE UNfTED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Federal National Mortgage Association, 
Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Guenther PIckney a/k/a GuentBr Piekny, and 
Marlene PIckney a/k/a Marlene Piekny, 
State Bank of the Lakes 
Defendanls. 

Case No. 96 C 2004 
Judge Undberg 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 29073 
(fT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLO- 
SURE SALES) 
Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on July 25, 1996. 

I, Stephen Nagy, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 22, 1996, at the hour of 1 1:00 am at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 

Lot 6Mn Westgate Unit Two, being a Rosubdivislon of part of 
.Westgato , being part of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 7, Township 
*46 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, accord- 
ing to the Plat of said Resubdlvislon Recorded September 9, 
1986, as Document 2480662, In Lake County, Illinois, 
c/k/a/ 616 Plumtree Ln„ Antloch, IL 60002. 
Tax ID #02-07-401-122 
The improvements on the property consist of two story wood 
framed single family dwelling with an attached garage. . 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The judgment amount was $184,000.08. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sate which will enable the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is nsl required to provide additional Information other than 
than sot forth in this Notice. 

/s/Stephen Nagy 

Special Commissioner 

1096C-338-AR 

October 16, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 

Novembers, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER 
FILE NO. 29082 
INTHE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Home Savings of America, FSB f/k/a Home 
Savings of America. FA, 
Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Lenard W. Eaker and Jill H. Eaker, 

Defendants. ' ■ „„_„„„ 

Case No. 96 C 1860 
Judge Shadur 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
flUH FILE NO. 29082 
(R- IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLO- 
SURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on July 26, 1996. 

I Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special Commissioner 
for this court will on November 20, 1996 at the hour of 1:30 p.m. 
at the front door of Lake County Courthouse, 18 N, County St., 
Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the follow- 
ing described premises: 

Lot 1 in Moody's Rasubdivision, being a Resubdivlsion of 
Lots 14 and 22, both Inclusive, in John H. Sasser's Resubdivlsion 
of Part of Ridgewood Park Subdivision in the North West 1/4 the 
South West 1/4 of Section 25, and the North East 1/4 of the South 
East 1/4 of Section 26, Township 43 North, Range 12, East of (he 
Third Principal Meridian, According to the Plat of said 
Rasubdivision, Recorded October 19, 1953 as Document 805889 
in Book 1207 of Records, Page 599, In Lake County, Illinois, 
c/k/a 551 Ravina Road, Highland Park, IL 60035 
Tax Id H 16-25-307-003 

The Improvements on the property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Safe Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to gen- 
eral taxes and to special assessments, 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The judgment amount was $334,127.37. 
Upon the sale being made, the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is not required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth in this Notice. 

■ /s/ Thomas Johnson 

Special Commissioner 

1096B-325-VH 

October 11,1996 

October 18, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

. FISHER AND FISHER 
FILE NO. 28802 
. INTHE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage, Inc., • 
Plaintiff, 
VS. 

Charles A. Edwards, 
Defendants. 

Case No. 96 C 0834 
Judge Castillo 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR RLE NO. gflBQg 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
THEIR OWJiATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLO- 
SURE SALES) 
Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above emitted cause on June 27, 1996. 

I, Edward Grossman, Special Commissioner tor this court will 
on November 20, 1996 at the hour of 1:00 p.m. at the front door 
of Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County St„ Waukegan, Illinois, 
sell to the highest bidder tor cash, the following described premis- 
es: 

Lot 26 In Henry J. Devlin's Second Subdivision, being a 
Subdivision of Part of the Northwest 1/4 ol the Northwest 1/4 of 
Section 14, Township 45 North, Range 9, East of the Third 
Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereol, Recorded May 4, 
1923, as Document 223520, In Book *L" of Plats, Page 72, In Lake 
County, Illinois. 

c/k/a 129 Adams, Fox Lake, IL 60041. 
Tax ID# 05-14-105-002. 

The Improvements on the property consist ol a single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The Judgment amount was $124,146.47. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 
For Information, call the Sales Officer al Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is fjoj required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 

/s/Edward Grossman 

Special Commissioner 

1096B-323-FL 

October 11, 1996 

October 18, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 



premises and real estate mentioned In said Judgment, situated In 
Cook County, Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to 
satisfy said Judgment, to wit: ■ 

Lot 72 in Southcreek, being a subdivision of part of the south- 
west Quarter and part of the Northwest Quarter, of Section 35, 
Township 45 North, Range 10, East of the Third. Principal 
Meridian, According to the Plat thereof. 
Recorded July 31 , 1989 as Document 2815719 and corrected by 
Certificate of correction recorded September 28, 1989 as 
Document 2835389, In Lake County, Illinois. 
Common Address: 

417 Signal Lane, Grays lake, Illinois 60030 
Tax ID No. 06-35-305-024 
Improved with a single family home. 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% down, balance 
within 24 hours cash or certified checks. 
Premises will NOT be open for Inspection. 

For information contact: Richard J. Nakon, Plaintiff's Attorney, 
121 E. Liberty Street, Suite 3, Wauconda, Illinois, 60084, 
Telephone number (847) 528-0626. 
Dated: Waukegan.-llllnols, October 18, 1996 
Gary Del Re, Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois 
Richard J. Nakon & Associates 
121 E. Liberty Street, Suite 3 
Wauconda, Illinois 60084-1929 
(847) 526-0626 
WP/PLEADING/NOT-SHRF.2 
October 11, 1996 



1096C-350-GL 

October 18, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER 
FILE NO. 28872 
INTHE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILUNOIS 
EASTERN DIVISION 
Home Savings ol America, FSB, 
Plainlilf, 
VS. 

Robert Feiger and Alyson Miller Feiger, . 
United States of America 
Defendants. 

Case No. 96 C 1240 
- Judge Undberg 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OURFILENQ.2flB72 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
THEIR QWH ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLO- 
SURE SALES) 
Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled causa on August 16, 1906, 

I, Stephen Nagy, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 22, 1996 at the hour of 1 1:00 a.m. at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse, Waukegan, Illinois, sell lo the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 

Lot 18 In Block 1 In Branlgar Brothers' Woodland Park 
Subdivision of parts ol the North Half of Section 29, Township 43 
North, Range 12, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according 
to the Plat thereof, Recorded August 5, 1924 as Document 
243980, in Book "M* of Plats, Pages 84, and 85, in Lake County, 
Illinois. 

c/k/a 1411 Stratford Rd., Deerfield, IL 60015. 
Tax ID ft 16-29-106-017. 

The improvements on the property consist of a single family, 
brick construction, 2 story home with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject lo 
general taxes and to special assessments. 
The property will NOT be open for inspection. 
The judgment amount was $227,430,38. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle Ihe purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 
For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is not required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 

Is) Stephen Nagv 

Special Commission 

1096B-324-VH 

October 11, 1996 

October 18, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 



PUBUC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
Grand National Bank and Trust 
f/k/a Wauconda National Bank and Trust 
a National Banking Association 
Plaintiff 
VS 

Douglas R. Rouse and Eileen M. Rouse, United States ol America 
Mary Ann Rouse, Doug Rouse Concrete, Inc. An Illinois 
Corporation 

Unknown owners and Non- record Claimants. 
Defendants. 

Case No. 96 CH 104 

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE 
Public notice Is hereby given that, pursuant to a Judgment 
made and entered by said Court In the above entitled cause, Gary 
Del Re, Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois, will, on November 16, 
1 996 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. (CDT), Lake County Sheriff's Office, 
25 S. Utlca Slreel, First Floor Conference Room Waukegan, 
Illinois, 60085, Bell al public auction the following described 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Ufetlme Reminder Service (LRS). 
ADDRESSES) WHERE BUSINESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR 
TRANSACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 365 Neville Drive #4, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 847-548-7437. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) 
OF THE PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCTING OR TRANSACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Gerald R. Ryborg, 365 Neville Drive 04, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 847-548-7437. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the undersigned intend(s) to conduct the 
above named business from the locatlon(s) Indicated and that the 
true or real full narne{s) of the person(s) owning, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct as shown. 
Gerald R. Ryborg 
October 12, 1996 

The foregoing Instrument was acknowledged before me by the 
person(s) Intending to conduct the business this 12th day of 
October, 1996. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Patricia Kassner 

Notary Public 

Received; Oct. 14, 1996 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1096D-352-GL 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 

Novembers, 1996 



. PUBUC NOTICE . 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: K G 
Medical Services. 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 

BUSINESS IS TO BE CON- 
DUCTED OR TRANS- ACTED 
IN THIS COUNTY: 34894 
Gogol Ave., Ingleslde, IL' 
60041. 847-587-0833. 207 S. 
Channel, Round Lake, IL 
60073.847-740-4419. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SONS) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANS- ACT- 
ING BUSINESS: Debbie Klein, 
34894 Gogol Ave., Ingleslde, 
IL, 60041. 847-587-0833. 
Rhonda GaramonI, 207 S. 
Channel, Round Lake, IL 
60073. 847-740-4419. 
STATE OF ILUNOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify trial the 
undersigned Intend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the location(s) Indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
full name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business Is/are cor- 
rect as shown. . 
Rhonda GaramonI ; 10/5/96. 
Debbie Klein; 10/5/96. 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 12th 
day ol October, 1996. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Jose M. Mejla 

Notary Public 

Received: Oct. 16, 1996 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1096D-362-RL 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 

November 8, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS ' 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Travel 
Quest Unlimited 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSI- 
NESS IS TO BE CONDUCTED 
OR TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 32715 North Forest 
Drive, Grayslake, IL 60030 - 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE 
OR RESIDENCE 

ADDRESS(ES) OF THE PER- 
SON^) OWNING, CON- 
DUCTING OR TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Marian B. Sides, 
32715 North Forest Drive, 
Grayslake, IL 60030 (800) 
494-9046. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the locations) Indi- 
cated and that the true or real 
full name(s) of the porson(s) 
owning, conducting or trans- 
acting the business Is/are cor- 
rect as shown, 

Marian B. Sides, Oct. 4, 1996. 
The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before me 
by the person(s) Intending to 
conduct the business this 2nd 
day of October, 1996. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

James A. Jllly 

Notary Public 

Received: October 2nd, 

1996 

Willard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

1096C-341-GL 

October 18, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

November 1, 1996 

See More Legate 
PageC28 







J 






K- •' 



. 



NovtMbfR 1, 1996" UkElANd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 





GUIDE 



; : i;;;AN : N(>UINee!Vt£NTS\;::, 

\' \ •'■'.•'■'. •//* ','.•'.•.' y.'S/y/sj S.'. v.*t *>> ».• j".*. v /.• x v .**•*/ • s. • .*' '» i ' •*•***• ;• W-*I •*••* '■•'■• '••'■■ '.■'.• » vx*x **• ;-x • vx. v x • ! *x*i- ! - x *x* >'• >t • ; 

Notices UO 

Lost & Found...- ; 115 

Free ....;.. 120 

Personals :... 125 

Auctions...!., „...,......, ; ...130 

Business Personals 135 

Financial .;„..... _... 140 

hi 



wsmm 



Eiviploytvn 



:':-;■■■■•:■■ :--v.x.;;.-: : :>;: ; :;:;: 
■•'-'■' — ■*.■.'.*' -* ■- X' 

Ildp Wanted Part-Time 219 

Help Wanlcd Pull-Tlme 220 

Employment Agencies. 221 

Business Opportunities ; ..........225 

Situations Wanlcd '. 228 

Child Care 240 

School/lnstrucUoo ........ 250 



MarIcet Guide 



Antiques 

Appliances.... 
Barter/Trade. 



: 301 

WilWW*M M«I M I # IIW«liWmi«H«HH f WWMMlM IHWHMIW '■<J«'i 
*IHI*IMtHIMMltlll4fl|tlHHHH«lil'UIMWtMHI*tHMH>HMIM*Jvfl 

Bazaars/Crafts .'. 310 

Building Materials 314 

Buslncss/Giltec Equipment '. 318 

Electronics/Computers..... .. 320 

Farm Guide .„ 324 

Firewood ! 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales .-. 330 

Good Things to Eal 334 

Horses &Tack .;.....-. 338 

Household Goods/FUmi lure. .:,..340 

Jewelry 344 

Lawn/Garden - - ..348 

Miscellaneous 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies ..354 

Musical Instruments....: » 358 

Pets & Supplies '. - 360 

Restaurant Equipment : 364 

Tools & Machinery • 368 

Wanted To Buy. 370 



ReaI Estate 



Homes For Sale..- 500 

Homes For Rcnl 504 

Homes Wanted. .. 508 

Homes Builders '. 510 

Condo/Town Homes .........514 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apartments For Rent 520 

Apartments Wanted ! 524 

Apt/Homes To Share 528 

Rooms For Rent 530 

Buildings -...533 

Business Property For Sale...- „ . ....534 

Business Property For Rent.. .;.. „ 538 

Investment Property ....:..... 540 

MongjRc Services ,..„„; _-.;.„ ....„ $44 

Farms :. „„ 54s 

Vacant Lols/Acr cage „ ...... .„„..„ 560 

Rcsorls/Vacatlon Rentals ..; 564 

Out of Area Property 568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Wanlcd 574 

Real Eslatcs Misc. 578 



MiSiiilli 



, ^/x?^/.•^^^^^x*:•^;•^^^^^>>x:•^.•^^X'^;^ : x-:•t>;-?;wi : i^;v/;•x 

Recreational Vehicles 704 

Snowmohlle/ATV's ; 708 

Boals/Motors/Elc 710 

Camping 714 

Travel/Vacation 718 

Sports Equipment ,720 

Airplanes 724 

TRAINSpORTATiON 

Cars For Sale. - 804 

Kenlal/Leases ....; „ 808 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Service & Parts „ 814 

Car Loans/Insurance...... 818 

Vans 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps 828 

Trucks/Trailers .. 834 

Heavy Equipment .'. -..-838 

Motorcycles « ■ *.MA 

Wanlcd To Buy..... . 848 

SERViCE DiRECTORy 

Appliances Repair . S03 

Blacktop S06 

Builders...'. S09 

Carpentry S12 

Carpel Cleaning ; :. S15 

Concretc/CcmcnL . S18 

Dry Wall '. S21 

Education/Instruction S24 

Electrical S27 

Firewood . .....S30 

Handyman •••■ S3 3 

Healing/Air Conditioning ■ S36 

Housekeeping S39 

Landscaping S42 

Laundry/Cleaning .'. »«SiS 

Legal Services...... S48 

Medical Services SSI 

Moving/Storage , S54 

Palntlng/DccoraUDg —S57 

ParaLegal/Typing Services..... S60 

Plumbing .". S63 

Pools S66 

Pressure Washing S6"9 

Professional Services S72 

Radio/TV Repair S75 

Remodeling. • >■■&& 

Resumes.. S 81 

Rooflng/Sldlng ■ S8< 

Storage,.....,. • • ®M 

Tax Service W 

Trccs/PJants - ^93 

Wcdding,..... v W 

Miscellaneous Services ...;... S99 ? 



disTRibuTioN 



Twin 

Lakes- 



•Silver Lake 



KcnoNltn 
County 

-, •BrlslDl 



Richmond 



•Spring 
Qtvn 



Jortruburg. 



McHtnry 



Crystjl, 

Lake ' 

Mcllcnry 
County 



•Antioch 



m 



•Late ■UndMhurtl 
Vita 



•FflUfn 



W) Lakt 



Wtowd« GfiytUke 

Lake Conhjy 



•WirxiUfct 

w ™. 1 *". ; .uundtiein N^ OikT 

•»*»! ****** /^\ -Vernon LfctrTjWI*^^ 

■Xlldwr 



Barring ion 



•Long 

Grovt 



• Palatine 



Buffalo Grove 



Metra 

:Milwaukee 
RR 




HOW TO PUCE A CLASSIFIED AD 



13? PHONE ... 



.LincolntWre u*«Fore«\ 




BY 
MAIL 

IN 
PERSON 



Call (847) 223-8161 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 



*-*\ BY FAX ... 

DEADLINES 



30 S.Whitney St. 
Grayslake 

(847) 223-8810 

Tues. 5 pm 



Cook County 



Direct Line 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Antioch News-Reporter • Round lake News • lake Zurich Enterprise 

• lake ViHa Record • Mundelem News • Wadsworth News • 

Grayslake ISmes • Fox lake Press • Gurnee Press • Iindenhurst 

News • tenon Hffls News • Wauconda leader • IibertyviDe News 






HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mon.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm , Friday 






CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



flp^^=^i 



no 



Notices 



ABSOLUTELY FREE WED- 
DING Packet! Call Gatllnburg 
Memories, Gatllnburg, IN. 
Autumn and Winterfest wed- 
ding specials to make your re- 
sort wedding simple, easy and 
affordable. 1 -80O-242-71 15. 

DIET MAGIC 
Lose up to 30lbs. 
30 day programs. 

Start at $30. 

(815)675-9237 

leave message. 

FREE PAGERS 

1-888-816-7243. 
CERT. #GS109512, 

Activation required. 

GOOD VOICES NEEDED 

For Tell The World" 

Interdenominational Choir. 

Ages 15-35, 

No pay, but lots of 

satisfaction. 

Churches book now for 1997. 

(647) 526-8306. 

SURROGATE 
MOTHERS WANTED 

Fee plus expenses for 

carrying a couple's child. 

Must be 18-35 and 

previously had a child. 

Steven Litz, Attorney 

(317) 996-2000. 



120 


Free 



125 



Personals 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A 
FREE or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at NO 
CHARGEI (We discourage 
any pet ads). Deadlines: 10am 
Wednesdays. (847) 

223-8161. ext.140. 



125 



Personals 



Help Wanted: 
Foster Parents 

Complete training, support 
and reimbursement provid- 
ed including daycare assis- 
tance. If you like young 
people and enjoy being a 
parent, call for more infor- 
mation! Catholic Charities 
| Foster Care-Ask for Caroline 
or Rosa (847) 249-3500 




. Wedding Ceremonies 

IVribnncd. 

Cull 

§. (&47) 949-4446 Ja 



115 



Lost & Found 



FOUND MALE NEU- 
TERED, declawed cal, 10/26, 
in Antioch area. (847) 
740-0677. 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Chargo. Call 
(847)223-8161. 



120 


Free 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 

FREE PICK-UP SERVICE. 
I will haul away your unwanted 
row boat, canoe, outboard 
motors, or fishing gear FREE. 
Call (847) 566-2819 after 
5;30pm. 

.3IVE AWAY ZENITH CON- 
SOLE, radio, phono. Every- 
thing works. Call (847) 546- 
3972 evenings or weekends. 

K0M3UCHA MUSHROOM 
BABY. (847) 623-1295. 



A BRAVE OPTION: ADOP- 
TION We're eager to share 
our warm and loving marriage 
and bright, sunny home with a 
baby. Your dream to give your 
baby a bright future filled with 
love, opportunity, good times, 
and an adoring family is possi- 
ble. We will be happy to help 
you In any way posst- 
blG... Please call Marsha and 
Joel at 1-800-484-6138 code 

2081. 

ADOPTION 

A LOVING OPTION 

We're a lawyer and actress 

who became best friends and 

married. We're now eager to 

become the doting dad and 

playful mom we've always 

dreamed of being. We can 

provide love, patience, humor, 

music, education and a place 

for your love and courage 

always In our hearts. Medical, 

legal, counseling and court 

approved living expenses 

paid. Information confidential. 

Please call our attorney al 

(708) 957-6817. 

ADOPTION. WE KNOW 

you have a difficult choice. Let 
us help you. We are a loving, 
married couple hoping to 
adopt. Jonna & Steve 1-800- 
845-5715. 

ALL THE LOVE a baby will 
ever want with a devoted fi- 
nancially secure couple. 
Maybe we can help each oth- 
er. Call Sandl and Bob 800- 
750-2629 code 18. 

LOOK GOOD FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS! 

LOSE THOSE EXTRA 

POUNDS NOWI 

30 day SSS-back guarantee. 

100% Natural. 

Dr. Recommended. 

FREE SAMPLES. 

Call Melody (647) 548^1191. 

THE PERMANENT 

CHOICE 

Electrolysis, the only 

permanent way to remove 

unwanted hairs. 

Specializing in multiple 

needle technique. 

Free consultation. 

(847) 680-5838. 

WANTED 23 SERIOUS 

Peopiel We'll pay you to lose 
up to 30H In the next 30 daysll 
Call 1-800-725-0916. This is a 
limited time offer. 

BUYERS AND SELLERS II 
- come togother every week] 
In Lakeland Classified. 



ADOPTION 

Be sure and choose 
the right family for 
your chilcL.one that I 
is concerned about 
what you are going 

through. Get to 

know several couples 

with pictures at 

www.cradle.org 

or call 

1 1-800-272-3534. g 



&^is&^s^w&mm;mof[^L : ioiaim 



! 
j 



SEARS PORTRAIT STUDIO 

PART TIME 

We're looking for enthusiastic, people-orient- 
ed individuals 18 yrs. or older. We provide 
an on-the-job training program in both sales 
and- photography. Retail experience is a 1 
plus, but not required. We offer frequent 
reviews, employee discounts, and advance 
men! opportunities. Must be able to work 
flexible hours which may include evenings 
and weekends. Salary commensurate with 
retail experience. 

APPLY IN PERSON 
MON.-SAT. 10:00 TO 7:00 

HAWTHORNE CENTER 

E.O.E. M/F 



140 


Financial 



SSCASHSS IMMEDIATE 

$$ for structured settlements 
deferred insurance claims. 1- 
800-386-3682 J.G. Went- 
worth. 



219 



Help Wanlcd 
Part-Time 



ADVERIISEVG 
SALES ASSISTAHTT 

Part-time person needed to support Display 

Advertising Dept. Manager & staff. Proofreading, 

client contact, and miscellaneous other duties. 

Contact: Esther Hebbard 
at Lakeland Newspapers 

(8*7) 333-8161 

or fax resume to 

(847) 228-8810. 



'AVON', NO DOOR-TO- 
DOOR REQUIRED. No Mini- 
mum Orders or Inventory, 
IND/SALES/REP, 800-236- 
0041. 

$1000's POSSIBLE 

READING BOOKS. 

Part-time. At home. 

Toll Free (1)800-218-9000 

Ext. R-9636 for listings. 

$1000's POSSIBLE 

TYPING. 

Part Time. At Home. 

Toll Free (1) 800-218-9000 

Ext. T-9636 for listings. 

WANT YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS? 
• Here's why there's no 

place like home. 

Free company 800 numbers 

tell ail, and do your work. 

Company does the selling. 

Company ships the products. 

No Inventory. 

Free 800 number 

teleconferences, 

800-678-5522 

ext. 4240. 



f "Krttime"! 

■UTILITY NEEDED! 

I Mon. - Fri. I 

I 10:00am - 2:00pm I 

Contact George ■ 

■(847) 821-9882J 



r«d[ 




ANTIOCH 

GRADE SCHOOL 

DIST. 34 

Now hiring Bus 

Drivers. 

Starting Pay $10.20/hr. 

Part-time 

position -work the 

school 

calendar year. Will 

Train. Must be 21 or 

older, clean driving 

record for the past 3 

years. 

Please call 

7am-4pm 

847-395-0494 



III 



PART-TOME 

Cook needed to 
prepare meals for 

Developmentally 
Disabled adults in 
residential facility 

west of Gurnee. 

For more information 
Call Peggy Larvick 

(847) 855-9450 



iSeamstress| 

; Vernon Hills mail order i 
distributor has Full & 
Part time positions 
using Automated 
equipment to sew cusr 
| tomcr names/logo's on I 
garments. No experi- 
ence necessary. 
S0/HR to start. 

Call Jo 
(847) 291-7755 



^wJ. •>--■•. - - - - •— - '-*- 



T 







CLASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers NovemBer 1,1 996 




S» 



4 





<8> 



IMMEDIATE POSITIONS FOR 
SEASONAL HELP 

■ CASHIERS 

• STOCK CLERKS 

• BIKE ASSEMBLERS 

• 6PM-2AM STOCK CREW 
(Hlnhlond Park only) 

• OVERNIGHT ST6CK CLERK 
(Vornon Hills, Gurnoq) 

• STORE ROOM CUSTOMER 
PICK-UP PERSONNEL 

FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES 
NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED 



I 



-Jr**»l Vt 



1610 Doorfield Rd., Highland Pafk.IL 0OO35 
♦ (D<17) O31-SS00 • Contact JoAm Longo 
i 5555 Town Uno Fid... Vtoron Has. IL 
] - (847) 367-OCG9 * Contact Amy Dow 
i 6050 Gumoo MBa BJvd., Gumoo, IL 
(B47) 055-8697 - Contact Suo Pbotlor 



E.O.E. 

Join UM Numtw 1 »p*etalty toy n»«»H«r 
and 3h*na In m« •xcKsment. 



INTERESTED?.. 

APPLT IN PERSON NOI 



I CiiKdtttef Service 



Seasonal ■; 

Part-time OpportuolUoSf 

Days or Cy.on?ng«| 

: Variable Hours ; 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



HELP WANTED P-T 

Beauty Salon Receptionist 

from B:30am-4:00pm 

Wed-Thurs-Fri 
For information call 

(847) 540-1107 

ask for Joan 






Part-Time 

JANITORIAL 

Cleaning & Light. Maint. 

1-5pmM-F $7-$8/hr. plus 

car allowance. Highland 

Pk/Long Grove area. For 

appt. (312)763-6000. 






Wtlh art increasing share of 
customers, we have outstanding 
positions (or bright, courteous individuals lo 
successfully service our incoming catalog 
orders this holiday season. 

The many merits of working for a legendary- 
leader include: 



•$7.55. per hour to start* 

•Automatic Pay Increases* 

•Employee Discounts* 

•Paid Holidays* 

•PaidTrainini;* 



To prepare you for our peak season, profes- 

! sional training is provided lo sharpen your 

customer service skills. Our shift schedules 

are: 9:00 a,m.-3:00 p.m., 12:00 p.m.-6:00 

p.m., 4:00 p.m.f 10:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.- 

closing. Some weekends are required, and 

work hours will fluctuate with call volume. 

So whether you're saving for the holidays, 
school, or a special getaway. JCPenney has the 
perfect part-time position with ihe flexibility 
you need. To be considered, apply in person 
weekdays, 8:30am-4:30pm or call to sched- 
jrTJ^ule an evening appointment. JCPenney 
t^r"\^%r^^ Catalog Customer Service Center, 
^V»#/jn^W 11 20 Lake Cook Rd„ 
•■^ A *W Buffalo Grove, IL 

(847) 459-2900. 



I 



Kfi 



HELP WANTED P-T 
"Siauti SaU* 7Zutpti»tUt 

from 8;30am-4:00pm 

Wed-Thurs-Fri 
For information call 

(847) 540-1107 

ask for Joan 
-" — rffl 



m. 



ra 



Cli 



Earn $6.50/hr. 
Cleaning Homes 

•Daytime hours, no 

evenings, weekdays, or 

holidays. 

•Paid vacation 

•Opportunity to advance 

Contact Welcome 

Home Cleaning 

[(847) 265-7366 



i 




m 



EOE NVF/D/V 




RUSH 0VTO TO TARGET 
ft F0D A GMT HOLIDAY W% 

Target Creatland Vernon Hilts has a variety of day, 

evening, and overnight entry level 

positions available throughout our store. 

> Cmfk > OmffiStodaxy 
>kh { $w ' >Gmigk?iw£kiige> 

> Out Aidant > Qmiigfi Tkwgrm 
> Vw Security >VayAiw£kical 

We offer competitive pay starting at $6.25/liour and 
$7.25/hour for our overnight positions. You'll also 
enjoy a 10% discount to make your holidays a little 
brighter. Stop by and fill but an application today: 

Target QreathmcL 

3 13 T. TamiUm Ifaad 
. yenuupttfill*, U 60061 



US 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



The Wauconda Park 

District is looking for 

mature, reliable 

employees to work at our 

Before School Club 

^j for the school year,^ 

fJ5 Hours are 6:30am- rjj 

9:00am. Call Lisa: 

| (8*7) 526-3610 



^EXPERIENCED* 
1 WAIT STAFF I 

^Part-Time evenings. Must be L 
^willing to work weekends, * 
^ Looking for mature Individ- T 
Junls who are interested In 
J long term employment with K 
Jjan established restaurant, r 

A ^ HIRING S_ L 

JCALL ARMANDO AT* 

d 
\ 



(847) 566-0475 

EL BARRIO 
RESTAURANT 



► 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 





ATTN: EXPERIENCED 

TRUCK DRIVERS DRIVE 
TO OWN II $0 DowrV78cents 
ALL MILES. OWNERSHIP IN 
18 MONTHS. AVG. 10,000+ 
miles/month. Company Driv- 
ers: NEWER EQUIPMENT, 
competitive pay/benefits. Call: 
NEW APPLE LINES 1-800- 
843-8308 or 1-800-843-3384 
Madison, SD. Mon-Frl 8-5PM 
Central, CAUJIII 



fHfi 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Tune 



220 



Help Wanted 
PuQ-Tlme 



CITY OF FLORA (5,093 p.) 

Seeking economic Develop- 
ment Director. Knowledge/Ex- 
perience: TIF, E-Z, Grant writ- 
ing/admlnlstrallon, Environ- 
mental regulations/land use 
planning. Funding/lending pro- 
grams. Written/oral communi- 
cations skills. Strong Inltia- 
llve/fol low-up business reten- 
tion/ recruitment. Resume: 
Economic development, Mini- 
mum Bacholors, 5 yrs. experi- 
ence or 10 yrs. experience w/5 
yrs. supervisory capacity. 
S30.000-S45.000/yr. DOQ. 
EOE. Apply by 4:30pm, 
12/3/96 to Robert Coble, City 
Atty., P. O. Box 538, Flora, II. 
62839. 

COMPUTER GRAPHICS - 
Full or part-time 486 PC to pro- 
vide graphics and tech sup- 
port. Call 1-800-455-3558. 

DRIVER $1,000 SIGN-ON 
BONUS. Starting S.26/S.27. 
Lateral entry pay to S.28/S.29. 
Paid beneftls/bonuses/more. 
Need: 1 year OTR experience 
- age 23, CX/Roberson needs 
OTR drivers for dry vans/flal- 
beds for PFT Roberson. Call 1- 
800-473-5581, EOE/mf. 

DRIVER - EARN $500 per' 
week guaranteed! Solos aver- 
age 2,500 miles/week, teams 
average 5,000 miles/week. 
Over 80% drop-n-hook, no 
cabovers or slip seating, 1- 
800-729-9770. EOE. 

DRIVER - REFRIGERAT- 
ED or flatbed. Become a con- 
tractor at Prime! No money 
down. No credit check. Top 
pay and 1,500+ mile average 
length-of-haul. Inexperi- 
enced? Free training avallale. 
800-224-4585. 

DRIVER TRAINERS 
RAISE Your Standards and 
Your pay. Benefits package, 
average 1800 miles per trip. 
Top trainer earns 70K. Experi- 
enced Drivers 1-800-441- 
4394. Graduate students 1- 
800-338-6428. 

DRIVER-OWNER OPERA- 
TORS, ATS WANTS YOUI 
Enjoy top pay/benefits, high 
miles, weekly settlement and 
much morel Anderson Truck- 
ing Service: 1-B00-24 1-8787. 
EOE. ! ' 

DRIVERS . ALL alr-rlde con- 
ventional. Top pay. Great 
benefits. 401 K. Excellent 
mites. Must be 25, 1yr. OTR, 
good MVR. Daymark. 1-800* 
240-7344 Ext. CF-4. 

DRIVERS - ARCTIC EX- 
PRESS, a Reefer Carrier run- 
ning 48 and Canada is In 
search of: Lease Purchase/No 
S Down. Owner Opera- 
tors/Company Drivers. Call 
NOWI (BOO) 927-0431. EOE. 

DRIVERS - HERE are the 
fadsl '94-'96 KW conv. walk- 
Ins; 28-30e/mi. + $40 tarp/load. 
Day 1 rider program. Mln. 1 yr. 
experience. Call Melton 24 
hrs.j7 days. 1-800-635-8669 
ext, CE-5. 

DRIVERS < INDUSTRY 
LEADING BENEFITS) 

Great pay, High miles, In- 
crease after only 90 days. Late 
model conventional, 

Teams/Solo drivers. Con-Way 
Truckioad Services 1-800- 
555-CWTS (2987). EOE. 

DRIVERS OTR - One year + 
experience, up to 30$ per 
mile, weekly pay, Insurance 
furnished, 401 K, Assigned 
tractors. Call Pat, Landair 
Transport, Inc., 1-800-593- 
8111. 

DRiVERS-CALARK INTER- 
NATIONAL OFFERS 
GREAT PAY, BENEFITS and 
the chance to GET HOME 
MORE OFTENI Must be 22 
with CDL and HazMat en- 
dorsement. 8S8-422-S275. 

DRIVERS...NOW HIRING 
TEAM drivers, experienced 
and Inexperienced drivers & 
owner-operators. Training 
available. Great pay & bene- 
fits. Rider programs. Swift 
Transportation 1-800-284- 
8785 (eoe-m/f). 

DRIVEHS/OTR • TUITION 

free OTR driver training. No 
experience necessary. Up to 
$540/week. Classes starting 
every Monday. Must be 21. 
CRST, Inc. 1-800-504-2778. 
http:/www.crst.com. EOE/mf. 

DRIVERS/OWNER * OP- 
ERATORS NEEDED D.L. 
WAID Trucking, Inc. Short 
Haul Flatbed Carrier. 

Life/Health Insurance, Vaca- 
tion, Home Weekends, Excel- 
lent Pay, New Equipment. Call 
Jim/Carl 800-245-9747. 



ELECTRICAL/ELECTRON- L 
|CS TRAINEES NO experi- 
ence required, High School di- 
ploma grads, ages 17-34. Paid 
relocation expenses. For Intor- 
vlew, call 1-800-469-6289. 

I iriFNSED LIFE & HEALTH 
AGf NT NEEDED. Quality 
products, high commissions 
with advance before Issue, 
lead system, and benefits. 
(Must qualify for advances & 
benefits). Call 1-800-252- 
2581. 

MAKE MONEY FOR THE 

HOLIDAYS. 

DISCOVERY TOYS 

HAS THE ANSWERII 

•Home based business 

♦Flexible hours 

*Great income 

•Be your own boss 

PLUS: Outstanding Toys For 

Your Entire Family!! ' 

NOW TRAINING 

Call (847) 356-2064 

leave message. 



OWNER OPERATORS 

TEAMS needed for dedicat- 
ed run available between Chi- 
cago and Portland, Oregon. 
Guaranteed turn. Home week- 
ly, benefits, bonus, GDS Ex- 
press, 1 ■800-782-6033. 

PROJECT ENGINEER: 
DESIGN and manufacturing 
of servovalves. Computer 
skills, CAD/CAE experience. 
Minimum 3 years experience. 
Salary DOE, Southern Michi- 
gan location. Call Ms. Sllvert 1- 
800-456-8644 ■ 

WESTWAY EXPRESS, 

INC. NOW HIRING EXPERI- 
ENCED OTR DRIVERS UP TO 
.30 CPM STARTING BASE 
PAY D.O.E. PLUS UP TO .06 
CPM BONUSES ROP PAY, 
BENEFITS, EQUIPMENT 
NOW LEASING OWNER/OP- 
ERATORS PERCENTAGE OR 
MILEAGE CONTRACT ZERO 
$$ DOWN TRUCK LEASES 
AVAILABLE. CALL Lee Bark- 
ley 1-800-99-DRIVE. 



EL£CmiCAL ASSEMBLER 

Connect, test & trou- . 

bleshoot using wiring dia- 

. grams & schematics. 

Refrigeration experience 

helpful. Days, Lake Zurich 

area. $12/HR. 
ACCENT ■ (847) 726-8367 



tv 



if i* 



FT/FT EMPLOYEES NEEDED FOR F AMILY 
FJvTCEFnMNMENT CENTER 

Sorting salary $6/hour • Friendly, outgoing personality 

Apply in person: FUN HARBOUR, 651 Lakehurst Rd. 

Lake hurst Mall 

For more info: (S47) S78-54O0 



m 



<£ 



POSTAL JOBS 

$12.68/hr. to start, plus bene- 
fits. Gamers, sorters, clerks, 
computer trainees. For appli- 
cation and exam info, call 
1-800-636-5501 ext P9509. 

8am-8pm 7 days. 



CHAUFFEUR 

Full/Part Time. Will 
train. Must be 25 years 
old and have a good 
driving record 
Call (847) 549-0020 



I QUALITY [ 
[TECHNICIANg 

| Immediate need forg 

■ individual l in ourjj 
SQuality DepL DutiesS 

■ include but not limited ■ 
■to auditing, inspection, S 
■and generating qualityg 
■reports. Must be com- £ 
■puter literate. Workings 
■knowledge of SPC.8 
5TQM, and ISO 9000 a 2 

■ plus. CQT preferred.- 
S Qualified . applicants: 
■may apply in person or* 
■send/fax resume to: 5 

| DANAHER I 
i CONTROLS! 



] 1675 DE1ANY ROAD ■ 
i GURNEE, IL 60031 



EAX: 

£847-662-6633 = 

* ■• - ■• 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■! 



CACI International, Inc. is a fortune 150 company recognized as a 
leader in information technology, with annual revenues of over $250 
million, employing over 3,500 personnel worldwide. Additionally, 
CACI is a recognized leader in providing military training and train- 
ing technologies. CACI is presently developing two proposals in 
response to the Naval Training Center (NTC) Great Lakes, Illinois. 
One proposal for instructor and curriculum development services and 
one for administrative support services. Resumes are being accepted 
for both proposals. Specific resume requirements as follows: 

Contractor's On-site "Training Manager; B.S. (minimum), nine 
years experience in the management of instructional systems, and 
twelve years occupational experience in a specialty closely compara- 
ble to the technical courses specified in the RFP, i.e., engineering, 
combat systems, gunnery, communications, and/or navigation. (9 and 
12 year requirements may run concurrently). 

Technical Instructor: HS diploma or equivalent, graduate of Navy 



Instructor Training (IT) Course (A-012-0011), two ■ years full time 
instructor experience, and six years performing in an equivalent or 
directly related specialty. (2 and 6 year requirements may run concur- 
rently). (Salary $41,968.80) 

Technical Instructor Supervisor: HS diploma or equivalent of Navy 



Instructor Training (IT) Course (A-012-0011), ten years combined 
instructor and supervisor experience, and five years supervisory expe 
rience in an equivalent specialty, (5 or 10 year requirements may run 
concurrently). (Salary $44,056.80) 

Contractor's On-site Administrative Manager: B.S. (minimum), 



four years experience in the management of an administrative work 
force in direct support of command, staff, and personnel functions. Six 
years occupational experience in a specialty closely comparable to the 
technical functions specified in the RFP, i.e., administration and/or 
supply. 

Administrative Support Services resume requirement 



Function 

Hazmat , 

Supply 

Student/Staff 

Equipment Inventory Management 

Student Housing Assignment 



Qualifications 
HS or Equivalent, plus three years experience 
HS or Equivalent, plus three years experience 
HS or Equivalent, plus three years experience 
HS or Equivalent, plus three years experience 
HS or Equivalent, plus three years experience 
Master Course Reference File Manager HS or Equivalent, plus three years experience 
Technical Publication Librarian HS or Equivalent, plus.three years experience 

Adn nistralivc HS or Equivalent, plus five years experience 

To be considered for an interview send/fax resume or SF 171 to- 

CACI Field Services, Inc. 

1081 19th Street, Suite 200 

Virginia Beach, VA 23451 

Attn: Pam Tompkins 

Fax (757) 491-6684 



• 



NovEMbER 1, 1996 UkElANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




220 



Help Wanted 
FUIl-Tirae 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS/STEP 

VAN 

Package delivery. 1 year 

experience required. 

$425/week. Weekends 

off. Advancement oppor- 
tunities. Call Brad at 

847-2724310 

EOE 



a 



w. 



R 



SUBSnTLTTE 1 ! 
SOBL BUS 
DRIVER 

CDLLic.Req. 

Big Hollow 

School Dist 

Ingelside. 
847-587-2632 



^ 



Highland Park 
Medical Office 

Busy Medical Office in Highland 
Park is now hiring for the following: 
MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 

Duties include patient traffice flow, 
scheduling, greeting patients, filing, 
telephone communications and 
computer usage. 
X-RAY TECHNICIAN 

Part time position available for an 
experienced x-ray technician. 
Candidate must have good commu- 
nication skills and willing to work 
Saturdays. 

MEDICAL RECORDS 
TECHNICIAN 

Full time position available for a 
medical records technician. Previous 
experience preferred. Candidate 
must have good communication 
and organizational skills. 
RN 

Seeking a part time registered nurse. 
32 hours per week. Saturdays a must. 

PLEASE CALL 

. 847-433-3460 
EXT 267 



* 



220 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-lime 



ESS 



packaging: 

; 1 st & 2nd shift needs. 

Llbertyville area. 

$8 - $9 hourly. 

Call Jennifer 
or Alex at 



P>ba ah£Z m ltTi' L-ainor an interview- 

549-9675$ (847) 9^-7440 



FULLTIME 
RECEPT10NI$T| 

Oral surgeons office in 

Llbertyville. Must be 

friendly, must have 

insurance billing 

knowledge. Experience! 

preferred. 

Call for an interview 



I Earn Extra Income!! ^ 
I Be Your Own Boss!! | 

g Our Delivery Service is 
g expanding and we are look- jg 
ing for Adult, Independant 
Contractors to deliver our g. 
g products in all areas of Lake g 
g County. Must have insured, g 
1 reliable vehicle. g 

.For more information call: » J 

I (847) 223-1009 ext 1 73 1 



DISPLAY ADVERTISING 
SALES 

Do you like meeting new people? 

Do you like solving problems? 

.Are you creative? 

Do you give good customer 

service? 

If this is you, we would like to hear! 

from you. Unleash your earning 

potential with this growth driven 

publisher. 

Can 647-223^8161 ext. 113 
or fax your resume to 

Esther Hebbard 

at 847-223-8810 

today! 

Group Health Benefits, 401 K & more! 



SNOWI'LOW & IMMBCAT § 
imTOEItS/OI'EKATOItS 

. Needed for snowplowing. 
Northshore area. 
Top Pay! Work today-pay tomorrow. 
. Lots of hours. 

(847)272-1747 



Dnren/Sctkiol Bui 




Put Yourself In The 
DRIVER'S SEAT 

If you're looking to pick up a great driving 
opportunity with National School Bus, 
you'd better not stand around waiting. 
We're hiring now in order to provide 
you with the training you need to 
transport children to school. Previous 
school bus driving experience is not 
required, bul a good driving record is a 
must. 



WE OFFER: 






■• 5 9.61/hour •Bpnuses 
y Paid Holidays • Child Care j 
i • Paid framing Assistance i 

mm ^m mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm m. mm 



Perfect PartTunt Opportunities for 

Moms • Rtlirta • Sludtnb ' Adors/Artists/MuskuiB 
or anyont with extra lime seeking additonal income 



&U6 *7<w£a^ 



NATIONAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE, INC 

- Equal Opportunity Employar M/F • . . 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

DearSearch, By Nancy Sakol 

Our company VP asked me to be one of a five person 
committee to put together out annual Christmas Party. It 
was at our first meeting, where he felt we should poll the 
employees (over 100 of them), the (jet new ideas. We felt it 
would be a moral booster for employees to give (heir input 
and thereon we would decided as a committee what would 
fit into the budget we were given. We sent out a survey to 
be filled out anonymously and were pleased to receive 
almost 75% return. The survey started out explaining our 
intentions to put together (his celebration for employees 
and their spouses. At our recent meeting we split the sur- 
veys among the five members and were to present differ- 
ent ideas the following week. Among the responses were 
more than a few who felt, the word "spouses" was discrim- 
inating and thereby took offense to it. We realized that in 
the work place there are those who are not married and 
once realizing our mistake, passed out a memo correcting 
ourselves so as to clear the air. All was fine until and anony- 
mous not was circulated to the committee members 
spelling out that there are several employees within the 
company who are gay and are offended by the term 
"employees and spouses" as being discriminating. It was 
stated that the term spouses refers to ones husband or 
wife. It is incredible in today's workplace you have to 
watch everything you say and do. Someone somewhere 
seems to take offense to something. It's nuts! By the way, it 
was mentioned to have a "black and white" party, where 
everyone can come dressed In any appropriate attire in 
black or white/wouldn't you know someone look offense 
to that too? Where docs it endT 
N.W.— Vernon Hills 

DeorN.W., 

You have actually, raised 2 questions. First, get your 
intentions across by inviting employees and a guest or 
employees and significant oilier. You will always find some- 
one who will take ofTcnse to something in and out of the 
workplace. It helps to have your eyes open and take a look 
around. Wc sometimes get so tuned in to a method, idea or 
expression, that we fail to see the way it may affect others. 
This may be an opportune time to utilize some of the things 
Lhat you have found may be offensive to others within your 
company. I would bring them up to the same VP who initi- 
aled the poll and committee. These arc die 90's. Tilings 
have changed and employers need to deal with equal rights 
in every aspect. Use this to the advantage of your company. 
Your group initially set out in a morale boosting effort. This 
can help to make your workplace a harmonious one. You 
have set the foundation for honest inpuL.kcep it up! 
Umployccs want to feel they are a part of a team. What bet- 
ter way then lo offer them a voice 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional and 
President of Superior Personnel in Gurnec. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy Sakol c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, P.O. Box2G8, Grayslakc, 1L 60030 



IY Help "Wanted 
'J Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuUTime 



HOSP11MJTY 
FROFESSIONAUS 

4 yr. deg. & hold cap. places you 
in a mgm't career w/us. We offer 

the fastest growth opptys 

nationwide. Due to promotions, 

we have openings for you! 

Generous bens. New hotels 

opening. Fax res lo 

Adam's Mark Hold 

"Opportunities" 

910/721-2260 



:$$holdwgash$$: 

* Distribute the New * 
; Ameritech Directories In* 

* the following areas: • 

jBarrington, Lake Zurich,* 

Wauconda and sur- J 

rounding areas. * 

For Information Call: * 
1-800-369-7225 : 



* 

* 

* 

* 
* 



SAVE $1 .00 

Save $1 .00 off your next word rate ad, when 
you use your Visa, Discover, or Mastercard to 
pay for the ad. 




Contact Lisa at 
(847) 223-8161 ext 140 

to place your ad 




POSITION 

AVAILABLE 

Bus Mechanic - 

Maintenance 

Specialist. 

An application may be 
requested from the 
Gurnee District #56 
Office, 900 Kllbourn 
Road, Gurnee, IL 
60031 (847) 336-0800. 
This is a 12 month 
position, including ben- 
efits. Hourly rate: $15 
to $17. Please contact 
Rebecca Allard, 
Director of Business 
' and Personnel at: 

(847) 336-0800 

for further information. 




srenarafaMS^ifltfa^^ 



ABBOTT LABORATORIES 



JOB FAIR! JOB FAIR! JOB FAIR! 

Al Abbott Laboratories, we have enjoyed over a cenlury of suc- 
cess providing health care producls and services lo individuals 
worldwide. Now is your opportunity to find out more about the 
benefits of being part of the Abbott team. 
Mon. November 4th 
8:O0AM-1 0:00AM and 2:00pm-6PM " 
Mings of China Grand Palace Banquet Center 
in front of the Hampton Inn 
1-94, Grand Ave. East Exit 
Abbott recruiters and hiring managers will be on hand 
to accept resumes for the following positions only; 

Food Service Opportunities 
We are looking for individuals with experience in food 
preparation, serving, catering, cashiering, baking, cook- 
ing and managerial experience. 

Production Operators 
Previous experience in a production/assembly line envi- 
ronment preferred. 

Housekeeping 
Previous housekeeping experience desired. 
Please bring.a resume on plain white paper with normal type- 
face so it can be scanned. If unable to attend the Job Fair please 
send your resume (or Abbott Laboratories, /ob*96-/BF-000Y, 
D584, AP5T, 200 Abbott Park Rd., Abbott Park, IL 60064-3537. 
Abbott is an Affirmative Action Employer/Smoke Free 
Environment. 

ABBOTT LABORATORIES 



EZJ 



Quality 
Health Care 

Worldwide 
Since 1888 



SIGNATURE 



GROLF 



Target success tor your fu- 
ture. The Signature Group, a 
wholly owned subsidiary 
ol Montgomery Ward, is 
opening a new location In 
Waukegan, Illinois. Join an 
industry leader in a new op- 
portunity and gel In on the 
ground floor. 

Full and part time telephone 
sales representative posi- 
tions for both day and evening 
shifts are available NOW. The 
Signature Group offers many 
benefits including; 

• Competitive salary 
structure 

• Paid company training 

• 4 pay Increases scheduled 
during the first year 

• Many benefits including 
paid vacation and holiday 
pay 

A prolessional, brand new 
and friendly environment 



No experience necessary 
Wa)k4ns welcome 

Call today for an interview 
(847)599-2900 



THE SIGNATURE GROUP 

2415 Grand Avenue 

(aboul at/2 mile east of 

Green Bay Rd.) 

Waukegan, IL 60085 



eoem/t/d/v 



ii 




If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading state 
mem from another firm re 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop 
cr credit to your account 
all payments Tor your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as invoiced 
and directed to: 

LaJceltnd Newapapcn 

30 8. Whltocy St. 

Qray.lake, IL 00O3O-O20Q 



HAB1LITATION AIDES 

Frances House, Inc., an 
agency serving ihe needs of 
developmentally disabled 
adulls is seeking qualified 
"ndivtduals to staff our new 
group hone on the northside of 
Waukegan. Excellent starting 
slalary, free meals, insurance 
available. All shifts are avail- 
able. Please apply at Q60 
South Lewis Ave., Wkgn, 
(847)244-2312. EOE. 



PHYSICAL 
IM H VIS. AIDE 

Small North Shore 

skilled Nursing Home is 

looking for a Certified 

Physical Rehab. Aide. 

Recent Graduates 

Welcomed. 

Call Sandra at 



£e 



OVA'S 



Small North Shore Skilled 
Facility seeks caring CNA's to 
work with elderly. All shifts 
available. Please contact 
Chcllie Burton 

HIGHLAND PARK 
HEALTH CARE CENTER 

847-432-9142 

Convenient bjr MrtM 



=s 



ijps or m\ ■ 9 oc * K 



to dispense Meds 3 g 
times a day at 
Group Home. 

We pay $12.00 a visit, j 
Please call: 

847-244-2312 



mpmremrtSg: 



QMRP 

to perform case 
management ser- 
vices to case load of 
MR/DD Women in 
residential selling. 
Bachelor's Degree 
and one year experi- 
ence wilh MR/DD 
population required. 
Contact 
Gail Becker 
Mount St. 
Joseph 

(847) 438-5050 
Lake Zurich 



DEVELOPMENTAL 

TRAINERS 
Immediate open- 
ings, Monday-Friday, 
day hours, entry 
level, will train. You 
train MR/DD Adults 
in personal care, 
prcwork, communi- 
ty & domestic skills. 

Contact 

Gail Becker 

Mt. St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

(847) 438-5050 



"El 



.a 



Full-time position for 
I our group home for the 

developmentally 
5 disabled. Minimum 24 
hours a week. 
Sanitation certificate 
i preferred. Split shifts, 
' benefits, competitive 
salary. Apply at: 

■ Waukegan Terrace 

] 860 S. Lewis Ave., 

■ (847) 244-2312. 

EOE 



Wllcrest 

CIWs 

Part Time 

• S7.oo/Hr. to Start 
• Great Benefits 

• Excellent Working 

Conditions 

• Fantastic Opporlunily 

apply in Person 

i7io n. circuit or. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

(Behind Burger King on Rollins Rd) 



! L-UO..',i- 



— U 




CLASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers Novemder 1, 1.996 









; ; 



i 







220 






Help Wanted 
Fulltime 



11 Help Wanted 

JJ Full-Time 



<**• 



220 



Help Wanted 
MTime 



220 



Help Wanted 
lull-Time 



9 > 



ATTENTION 

COMPUTER 

CONSULTANTS 

Cot iT? 

WIN NT, WIN 95, WIN 3.1 , UNK 

Get it? 

The world's fastest 

growing IT staffing firm Js 

looking for: 

• PC Tech 
• HeIp Desk 

• CoMpUIER OpERATORS 

• Tech Withers 

To get the most far the talents 
you've got..contact: 

RHI CONSULTING 

5 Revere Dr., #355 

Northbrook, I L 60062 

&47-480-1774 

FAX; 480- 1871 

rhic.nthbrk@nol.com 

EOE/NO FEE 



JUNIOR 
MOLDMAKER 

I Wanted: Junior moldmaker 
jfor our fasl paced modern 
I toolroom. 

J We are looking for a motl- 
j voted person with at least 5 
lyrs. of experience in all 
I facets of plastic Injection 
jmold making. 

IWe offer great benefits &l 
I salary comparable to the| 
Urea. 

Tired of the traffic? 

Join the team at 

Automated Mould in 

Richmond, IL 

Contact: Bob Kraemer at 

815-678-458t 



MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 

Full Time 

OutRolriK. personable and caring person needed for busy oriliopae*i c 
practice Must be a multitasking self starter with alien i on Jo «Jc«all. 
knowledge of managed care required. Experience with +Mcdlc a 

plus. Contact Linda at 

847-249-6242 



--.I. ubiiLPF; 



FT/PT SALES 
for Art Gallery 

Experience preferred 
butnotnecc. Must be 
reliable & responsible. 
Days/Evening liours. 

Call Karen at 
(847)855-9222 
I or fax resume to 

(312)372-8582. 



EOE 



liiiiiiittiBiiaiiiiiitiiiitiiiimitiiiniuiiiii niiiiiin iiin 

HVAC SHEET 

METAL 
INSTALLER 

HVAC Experience 

shoot metal Installer 

needed. Insurance 

and benefits. 

Call: 

847-265-1400. 

!iniiiiM!!iNiiM!tiiiiiii!iniiiiniiiiniri!iuiiiiiifiniu 



■mam? w&HffB® 




A^ miini/.Vii i n \f]\\\ u /////« 

^£ is opening a new store in 




WAUC0NDA 

•20 immediate positions to be filled* 
"full or part-time* 



EWERS 

earn up to S12 per hour 

must be \8 years old, have own 

insured vehicle and a good 

driving record • 



mum 

starting at $5.00 per hour 

phone persons and 

pizza makers 



/ 



V 



Starting Salary 

$6.00/hr 

30+ Hours/wK 

Apply in Person: 

T-Shirt Store 

Lakehurst Mall 

Waukegan, IL 

(847) 473-1933 




MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE 

Call (847) 566-0404 

to join the World's Largest Pizza 
Delivery Company 



PICK <N* PACK 

$7.00 to start. 90 day increase! Pleasant environ- 
ment, nice boss, happy employees. Call today: 
(847) 549-0016 Vernon Hills 
(847) 244-0016 Gurncc 



__>uperior Jteri 



ersonoel 



'RJs E ATE IT 

Needed: 

»Waiters/Waitresses, 

>■• Experienced^ 

Restaurant 

Managers 

(exp. necc. in fasdbod) 

Stop In 8c Apply 

ASK FOR ROBIN 



REPORTER 

Great Lakes Bulletin has an opening on its 
expanding editorial staff. Experience pre- 
ferred with background in photography help- 
ful. Will handle a variety of assignments. Will 
be working with a varied schedule and be 
able to work under deadline situations. For 
interview appointment fax resume to: 
Bilk Schroeder, Jr. 
General Manager at 
(847)223-8810 



jiiiiiiiiiim mm i .mm i M i in, in i mum' 



DRIVER/SALESMAN 
iHOME EVERY NIGHT 

Brandt Truck Line needs experienced driver to live and 
work in surrounding counties. Brandt drivers have to 
enthusiastic and interested in serving the customer. 
We need one day driver and one night driver to come 
to Bloomington and return home every night. Our dri- 
vers need one year experience and a HAZMAT 
endorsement on the CDL. In return Brandt offers: paid 
life insurance, disability Insurance, exc. wages, good 
equip., paid medical insurance, paid holiday and vaca- 
tion. Wc provide uniforms and 401k with matching 
funds. Be respected in our industry. Work for Brandt. 
Con t act Steve Kubich 

1-800-322-4395 or send resume to P.O. BOX 97, 
Dloomington, IL 61702-0037, 



ONE STEP AHEAD 

Wc are looking for people who: 

• know what It means to give outstanding customer service 

• have an interest in baby products 

• want to bring fun and enthusiasm lo our company 
truly believe the customer always comes first 

We offer: 

• a great group ol people to work with 

• a competitive benefits package 

• an outstanding employee discount policy 

CnwSU^;yH5HuK;k5Kiincb;d^prrjdiiclsr^abr^luKfiTime- 
dialc openings at our Lake Huff calakigoperalion center. 

• part-time and fufl-time sales and customer service 

full-time receptionist 

We also have openings available at our retail outlet in 
Dccrfleld. 

If you want to learn more about the opportunities we 
have and would like to grow with us: 

Call 847-615-2110 or apply In person: 

One Step Ahead 

75 Albrechr Dr. take Bluff, IL 

Fax:847-615-2162 

Tiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiilliiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniilliiiilillillliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiminuiiiiiiiii in7 



& 



If 



,,; DRIVER 

Our growing Lake County Company is 
seeking a part time van driver. 20 hours 
per week with lifting at various times. 
Valid drivers license and clean driving 
record a must. Perfect for retired or semi- 
retired individuals. 
Interested candidates please call 
Sue Loftus at ; 

(847) 223-8161 ext. 173 



r U Help Wanted 
JJ Pull-Time 



It Pays to 

Advertise 

Place your private 
party classified 

ads on Visa, 
Mastercard, or 
Discover and 
save a #1.00. . 
To place your ad 
with your credit 
cord, coll Lisa at 

(847) 223-8161 

cxtim 



rft 



*SSS-SSSS®SSSS.SS® 



:. 17 J I 



OPENINGS 2ND 

We are taking applications for the fallowing positions: 




• PUNCH PRESS OPERATORS 

This Is an opportunity for qualified people to work full time for a 

progressive company. A good work record ts required. Wo have a 

good reputation for maintaining a clean and safe environment. 

We provide competitive salary and benefits. 

Call Personnel Dcpt. (B47) 430-4GOO A 

or apply in person 



ttAW-"K»*J 



800Ela Rd. 



, INC. 
ILake Zurich, 



II- 



Equal Opportunity Employer 



I 






COLLECTORS 

Gurneo basod Eagle 
Finance is seeking part-time I 
loan collectors. Hours lor 
conslderalion aro Monday 
thru Thursday trom 4pm to 
9pm and Sat. trom 9am lo 
1pm. Past experience In 
| loan collection or customer \ 
service Is desired. This moti- 
vated Individual must bo able 
to work In a fast paced envi 
ronment and spend most ot 
their time on the telephone. \ 
Call anytime to complete an 
automated telephone job j 
application: 

1-800-549-0841 

ext 2885. 



ss 



SAFETY/SECURITY 
REPRESENTATIVE 

. At Quill wen? committed 
to doubling our sales in the 
next5years. And we want 
you to be a part of it by 
joining us at our Corporate 
Headquarters In 

Lincolnshire. 

When you're as ambitious 
as we aro, you Deed peo- 
ple whose sights are set 
just as high. Are you the 
person we're looking far? 
Then build your career with 
one of the workrs leading 
direct marketers of busi- 
ness products. 
Mxj will be responsible for 
maintaining fire suppres- 
sion and burglar alarm 
systems, conducting secu- 
rity rounds, ensuring com- 
pTiance with federal, stale, 
and local safety regula- 
tions, and performing prop- 
erty management func- 
tions. 

We require a HS diploma 
and prefer some college 
and/or at least 1 year fire 
suppression and 

safety/security experience. 
Completion of basic first 
aid and CPR training Is a 
plus. Must possess a valid 
driver's license. Strong 
writtorvvorbal/inter person- 
al skills a must 

For immediate considora- 
tion, mail or fax your 
resume to: 

Quill Corporation 

100 Schelter ltd. 

DopLSAFE 

Lincolnshire, IL 00069 

FAX# 847-634-5820 
EOE 

I QUILL J 

an a 



Clerical 

PNC Mortgage 
currently has excellent 

opportunities available for 
the following professionals: 

LOAN 
ASSISTANT 

F\ill-Time 

Mxj will review and process 

loan documents within a 
required lime frame, A HS 
diploma and 1 yoar of otrice 
experience are required. 
Some mortgage* banking 
experience Is preferred. 
Accurate data entry skills, 
along with good communica- 
tion and inter persona) skills 
are essential. 

STAFF 
ASSISTANT 

Part-Time 
Evenings 

"rbu will conlact homeowners 
to discuss past duo balances 
and enlor information Into a 
databaso. Other clerical 
duties will also bo assigned. 
A HS diploma Is roquirod, 
along with some office expe- 
rience. Typing skills ol 30 
wpm, PC experience and 
good verbal/written commu- 
nkalion skills aro a must. 
Hours; M-Th 5-10pm, Sal, 
9am-1pm. • $Q.66/hr. plus 
evening differential. 

Wo ollor a professional envi- 
ronment, and competitive 
compensation. Ploaso send 
or fax cover loiter and 
resumo lo: 

PNC Mortgago Corp. 

Human Resources Dept, 

KBH, 75 North Fairway 

Drivo, vemon Hills, IL 60061 

Fax (847) 549-2568. 

Equal Opportunity Employw 
M/F/D/V 

PNC MORTGAGE 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Waited 
Pull-Time 



V 



ft 



Look forward to work each clay ] 

Seeking 2 self-starting Individuals with customer ser- 
vice ability and a "pitch in" attitude 
(847) 549-0016 Vernon Hills ^ 
(847)244-0016 Gurncc ^%,d^ 

iperior JZerionpcl A 



Ira 



B : B 

CONSTRDCTIOlV-CrVrV 

Immed Opening. Aerial 
Sub-Contractors & Aerial 
Lineman needed for long- 
term construction project 
In Atlanta area. 



770-389-1151 



EL 



M 



HOUSE 
CLEANING 

Must be oyer 21 Sc ha»e 

experience Sc car, $7/hr. 

Start Immediately 

(847) 680-1146 



EXPERIENCED 

SERVERS 
WANTED 

Neat Appearance, 

good attitude & a 

willingness to work 

need only apply. 

(847) 395-8883 



SALES POSITIONS 

AVAIL AT AREA 

STORES 

Exp. a plus, but not 

necessary. 

Apply in person at 

Wheeling location. 

COLLINS FIREPLACE 

& PATIO SHOP 

561 W. Dundee Rd. 

Wheeling, IL 60090 

or 
For more info call 
847-541-4646 
jj ask for Doug Collins 



B 



!i 



ML1«5* 

ASSOCIATE 

We have an immediate? 
need for an individual for 
our' M.I.S. operation. 
The Ideal candidate will 
have programming 
experience using 

RPG/400 or RPG3 on 
an IBM AS/400 or 
System 36 and a work- 
ing knowledge of 
MAPICS in a manufac 
luring environment. 
Experience in LAN envi- 
ronment a plus. 
Associates degree pre- 
ferred. Qualified candi- 
date should apply at or 
send/fax resumes to 



CONTROLS 

1675 DELANY ROAD 

CUHNEE, IL 60031 

FAX: 

847-662-6633 



V 



3QDOQQQB&SOS 



School EM 



jW.v-j^^-^yLU 




Mit 



SlBSTTME directory 

The following schools need substitutes on a 

continuing has Is, please contact the names listed 

below for further Information. 

Antloch C. C. School DlsL 34 

850 Highview Dr., Anlloch, IL6O002 /.',:■ '-^ 

Co«toS-KaihyorRose.....*: (847)395-0712 

Antakislc - Tripp School DlsL 102 

1231 Welland Rd, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 , lxf , „,„ 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak. '. (847) 634-5338 

Deerfleld School DlsL 109 

517 Deerfield Rd., Deerfield, IL 60015 j.-j';- t -' M 

OmAKftMls.. (847)945-1844x222 

Fox Lake School District #114 

17 N. Forest Avenue, Fox Lake, IL 60020 ,,,,„„,„, 

Con tad: Rayn a (847) 587-73 II 

Fremont School DlsL79 -, . 

28855 N. Frcemonl Center Rd, Mundeleln, IL 60060 

Contact:]m Story (847) 566-9384 

Gavin School Dtst 37 . t 
25775 W. Hwy. 134, Inglesidc, IL 60041 

Contact: Delete Griffin (847) 546-99.13 

Grayslakc Community High School Dlst 127 
400 N. Lake Street, Grayslake, IL 60030 

Contact: Lana Madole (847) 223-8621 x-1210 

Hawthorn School District 73 ■ . 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vemon Hills, IL 60061 > ■ 

Contact: Mary fell • -(847) 367-3279 

Immaculate Conception 

510 Grand Are, Waukeean, IL60085 ;k A . < Vl . 

Contact: Kathleen Whalcn or Carol Drew (847) 623-41 10 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 

95 W. Deemalh, Lake Forest, IL 60045 ; . , '• ,,,„,„ 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 234-6010 xll7 

Libertyvllle School DlsL 70 

1441 W.Lake Si, Ubertyville, IL 60048 ■■_• • 

Contact: Carole Shinton (847) 362-9023 

North Chicago Community Unit School DlsL 187 

2000 Lewis Ave. North Chicago, IL 60064 

Contact: Mrs. A. Sherrod (847)689-8150x254 

North Shore School Dist 112 

530 Red Oak Ln., Highland Park, IL 60035 /, v V. 

Contact: Laurie Maclntyre (847) 831-4370 

Prince of Peace 

135 S. Milwaukee Ave,, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: David Worklan (847) 356-611 1 

Richmond Burton High School 

10006 Main Si., Richmond, 11.60071 , , 

Contact: Mary Anne Gaylord (815) 678-4525 

Round Lake Area Schools 

316 S, Roscdale CI, Round Lake, IL 60073 

Contact: Mary Anne, Hum. Res (847) 546-5522 x3009 

Special Education of Lake County 

18160 Gages Lake Rd, Gages Lake, IL 60030 

Contact: Pat Wichlin (847) 548-8470 x204 

Spring Grove School 

2018 Main St.. Spring Grove, IL 60081 ' 

Contact: Kathleen Mahr (815) 675-2342 

St. Gilbert School 

231 H. Belvldcre Rd, Grayslake, 11,60030 

Contact: Sr. Elaine , (847) 223-8600 

St. Joseph's School 

1 18 N. Lincoln, Round Lake, IL 60073 

Onitact: Jeanne tolas, Print or Maureen Crcedcn . .(847) 546- 1720 

Zlon Elementary School DlsL 6 

220 Bcihesda Blvd., Zlon, IL60099 

Contact: Karen Baughman , ,(847) 872-5455 



\ 



n 







NovEMbER 1, 1996 LaIceIancI Newspapers CLASSIFIED 




220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time- 



220 



Hdp Wanted 
Full-Time 



Lead Teachers & 
Assistant Teachers 
New Day Care Center 

(847)367-9766 



TEACHERASST 

Teacher Asst. nee< ' ■ it 

for Fox Lake Craae 

School District.: 

Must have 30 

college credits. 

CaU 

(847) 587-7311 



RJJ1 TTOE I 



COLD HEADER 




Paid holidays 

• Health Insurance 

• Profit sharing 




MACHINISTS 

We are a rapidly 
| expanding company 

located In the Fox 
I Lake area with sever- 
al (lilt time perma- 
nent positions avall- 
lable. We need moti- 
I voted persons capa- 
ble of machinery 
repair who are able 
to run mills, lathes, 8 
grinders. Have own 
tools a plus. Pay 
based on 
experience. 

RICHFIELD 

MACHINE 

(847) 587-65531 



XSyf Customer Service 
Y/ YOXJ 

DESERVE 
MOOREl 

Moore Business Forms, a gtobai 
loader In the forms Industry, Is 
looking for energetic detail orient 
ed IndMduals to vwxk Full & Ran 
Time. Join our tast pacoc 
National Customer Service 
Cenloras: 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 
REPRESENTATIVES I 
We seek strong cornmunicatorsl 
with excellent phone skills to han- 
dle high voiumo of incoming calls. 
This position Is responsible for 
processing customer orders 
proof of deliveries and resolving 
customer Inquiries. PC literacy a 
must Previous experience In an 
inbound call center environment 
preferred. - 

ORDER PROCESSORS 

Wo seek self-starters with greal 
phone & data entry skills to 
process & enter orders via PC, 
Attention to detail, the ability to 
work indepondantly and as a 
teem player & typing 40 wpm am 
required. 

Recent College Grads 
aro Encouraged to Apply 

for Both Positions! 
'four commitment to quafity will 
bo rewarded with an EXTREME- 
LY COMPETTTIVE SALARY & 
GREAT BENEFITS. Forward 
resume lo: 
MOORE BUSINESS FORMS 
Attn: Recruiting Depl - LP 
560 Bunker Court 
Vernon Hills. IL 60061 
FAX: 847-91 8-3070 
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. 
EOG WF/IW. / 

MOOTJEsZ 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DENTAL ASSISTANT 

Full or part time Denial 
Assistant needed for spe- 
cialty offices. Must be 

friendly & outgoing. 

Experience preferred but 

will train right person. 

(847) 367-5505 



HnnOBBOOBBBBBBBOBBBOBBOII ' 

TmmI $erwce\ 

Part time 
Monday- Friday 

(847) 940-7824 



l 



Teachers & 
Assistants 

If you want to make a 

difference in l a child's 

life, call Kathy 

(847) 634-1982 



&BHCBBHBaHBQSS9BBgsaQE5 



MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM 

RTEA.CHERSB 

m Beautiful new center m 
M in Mundelein seeks jj 
b full time teacher K 



■BBOBBBBBBEBBBBBBBB 

I GENERAL I 
I OFFICE/DATA ENTRY I 

B B 

g Assist the book-keeper In g 
E Data Entry, Aft and other g 
I duties, Small otlloe vart- g 
;| ety. FT permanent posl- 
I Hon. Full benefits. Send 
| resume or apply In person: j 

n Lube Oils Inc. 

345 Skokie Hwy 
5 Gurnee, IL 60031 
I 847-249-2330 \ 

■HBEBEEEBBEEEEEBEBI 



% Call Bob or Otto for & f 
S an appointment % :: 

| Skadi Mfg. Co. p 
j 847-395-3560 1 || 

roiRmiFT 

DRIVERS 

1st, 2nd, & 3rd shirts 

available. . 

Certification preferred. 

$8 hourly. 

| F/T hire potential great! | 

Call Alex at 

81 6-8707 



♦#»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»»♦♦♦♦♦»»♦» 

DAIA ENTRY 

OPERATORS . 
1st Shift (8:30-5:30) 
2nd Shift (5:30-HPM) 

Apply in person: 

Student Services Inc. 

2550 Commonwealth Ave. 

North Chicago 
• •••••Oft* 

Data Entry Supervisor 

Full Time 

• • Apply in person 

Student Services Inc 

2550 Commonwealth Ave. 

North Chicago 
• •••••••4 

Maihoorn/Warehouse 

Supervisor 

Full Time 

Apply in person 
"' 'Student Services Inc.' 

2550 Commonwealth Ave. 
North Chicago 



SCHOOL BUS 
DRIVER 

ROUND LAKE 

AREA SCHOOLS 

DIST. 116 

Immediate opening for 

Full Time and 
Substitute bus drivers. 
Class B-CDL and stick- 
shift experience. 
$9.00/hr. Full benefits 
for Full Time. 
Apply in person 
7:30am to 3:00pm 

District Service 
Center 

81 1 N. Sunset Drive 

Round Lake, IL 

60073 



Restaurant 

WANTED 

Energetic, self-starting 

individuals to work a flex- 
ible full-time schedule 
with rotating weekends. 

Selected individuals will 
be part of the team In the 
food & nutrition services 
department at Condell 
Medical Center. 

Responsibilities could 
include, but are not limit- 
ed to: 

• Passing patient trays 

• Dishroom sanitation 

• Cafeteria service 

• Serving on the patient 

traylino 

Need that ntm 
extra income??? 

We will try to work around 
your schedules. Applicants 
need not have prkx food 
service experience, we will 
train. 

We provide an excellent 
salary and a pleasant work 
environment. Apply in per- 
son or send resume to: 
Human Resources Dept. 
303 Cleveland Ave. 
Llbertyville, IL 60048. 
EOE 

CONDEa MEDICAL 
CENTER 



h qualified & part time " 
m assistant teachers, h 
k Must meet all state m 
** qualifications. * 
K ' Please calf S 

I (847)970-9554a 

h for interview m 

M M 

HHHHMHHHMMMHHMMMHHH 



ACCOlWnNG 

Mail order company 

relocating lo Vernon . 

Hills has immediate 

opening for a mature 

individual for 

Accounting Department. 

Experience with cash 

receipts, account 

balancing & customer 

contact required. 

Call Tom 

(847)291-7755 






WAREHOUSE 

Vernon Hills mail 
order distributor 
has openings for 
order fillers and 

receivers. 

Call Scott 

(847) 291-7755 



NOW HIRING! 

Northbrook Court 

Cinema 14 

1525 Lake Cook Road 

Northbrook 

Join the team now for full 

and part-time positions 

and enjoy these benefits. 

Competitive wages - 
flexible schedules - free 
movies. Pick up an appli- 
cation at the Lakehurst 

Cinema boxoffice. 

Specify Northbrook Court 

on application 

EOE 



! SECURITY! 
OFFICERS! 

'Join The Leader!' 

) Here's your opportunity to[ 
) join one of the area's fastest ( 
) growing private security orga- [ 
Inizatlons... Stanley Smith! 
JSccurlty. For over 70 years,! 
) we've work with many of the! 
1 area's top companies and! 
lhavc Immediate full and pan! 
Itlme opportunities for careert 
1 oriented Individuals. To quoit- C 
Ify, you must be at least 18 1 
1 years of age, have ownC 
hrasporlation and enjoy t 
i responsibility. No experience H 
I required; competitive pay and t 
'training provided. For morcj 
1 information, call Pat Koczor at [ 
|l -800-942-9394, Ext. 708. 

Stanley Smith 

Security 

eoe m/t/d/v 



We are looking for 
qualified individuals for 
the following positions: 

• Front Desk Clerks 

• Banquet Supervisor 

• Maintenance Worker 

• Night Audit Clerk . 

We offer excollent bonofits 

that include: 
Health insurance, vacation 
pay and employee meals. 

Please apply in person at, 

Holiday Inn Mundelein 

510 East Route 83 

Mundelein, IL 60060 

(847) 949-5100 



fc= 



E/O/E 



-/S 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

COME JOIN A 

GROWING COMPANY 

Do you enjoy working 

with people? 

We have the right envi- 
ronment for you. We 
are currently seeking 
two individuals. with 
excellent communica- 
tion skills who are hard 
working and . 
dependable. 

Please send resume to 
Randy Freeman. 

anhoch 

CELLULAR 

430 Lake Street 
■AnUoch.IL 60002 

Voice: 847-838-5206 
Fax: 847-838-5209 




^^ayslake Law firm. Must 

fewproQclent InWOSfll 
ft- PERFECT, Jg 
,:■ .Experience preferred; 
|Salaxy to commensurate|| 
■ Wfu^,o^crtence.StiBitj|g 
|: iroroedlately. Fax resUrrJell 
•„ . to:.- ■■■'<'4<™s$b& 

[8*7)223-1700 
Bureau 223-lSOo 
or mail to 
KO, Box 7027 , 
Cray»iakML6G03Q 



: m>,mmm 

Now accepting 

applications for 

•Deli DepL 
•Bakery DepL 

•Cashiers 
•Service Desk 

•Personnel 

Apply in Person 
at Gumee 

PigglyWiggly 

5330 West Grand Ave. 

847-662-0700 



FULL/FT 

[Positions available 
front 'De&k, 

Flexible hours 

Excellent 

Advancement 

Opportunities. 

Please Apply in 

Person: 
Budgetel (nn 

JG88 North Ridge 

Rd. 
Gumee, IL 60031 

At the Intersection of 

94 & Grand Ave. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full Tune 



jr 



1AUTO BODY! 
| PAINTER | 

j| Opportunity for quality = 
=minded responsible per-§ 
Eson to work In a nation-g 
=ally known high quality! 
gshop. You will needg 
gskills in restoration work| 
=for . production work.s 
=Must have own tools.E 
gjLong term position wilhf| 
Ifgood pay. Call: E 

|(847) 566-7469J 

niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiin 



CR, 
Styles 




in 
Barrington 
is now hiring. Established I 
hair salon with creative, 
friendly atmosphere Is tak- 
ing applications for: 

• FT Stylist * FT Solon 

Receptionist • 

PT Shampoo Help. 

We're expanding fast, 

Call today! 




INSPECTORS 

' Medical supplies 

inspection. 
Mundelein area. 
Previous inspection 
background pre- 
ferred. 1st & 2nd 
shifts available. 
Must be computer 
literate! 
$8.50 hourly. 
Call Carmen at 

549-9675 

for an appointment. 



fi= 



CLERKS | 

Filing, reception 
& data entry 

skills 

needed for 

Libertyville 

manufacturer. 

$8 -$11 hourly. 



& 



CaU Jennifer or 
Stephanie at 

816-8707 1 

for an appointment. I 



ft 

n 
* 



DRIVERS 







WflHTED 

|( $$ Earn that Extra Cash $$ § 

A Residential delivery. | 

\ Small car and ty 

j| insurance necessary, y 

8 Mundelein $ 

A (8*7} 949-92*0 n 

Ask for Jerry J| 



i 847-265-1400 > 



Majot Franchise 225 Room 

Hotel, under renovation, 

has the following openings: 

• Room Attendant 

• Front Desk Agent 

• Wait Staff 

Good work environment 

Excellent possibility for 

advancement. Apply at the 

GURNEE 
ft 

^oMcu}S>y\a; 

61 Gl W. Grand • Gumcc, IL 
C0O31 or fax 6-17-336-9143 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

OUR FORTUNE 500 Clients 

need your customer service 

accounting & administrative, 

general office, data entry 

skills for long term and lemp- 

to-purm assignments. We 

offer competitive salary. 

Please coll Nancl at: 

. Express Personnel 

Services 

(B47)B 1 6-8422 

or Fax (847) 816-0000 

WE OFFER THE LEADING 

HEALTI f CARE PACKAGING 

IN THE PERSONNEL 

SERVICES INDUSTRY! 



JBRUKSWICKl 
; Foodservice i 

• help wanted • 

S Deli/Utility person I 
S needed to help out in • 
S busy executive cafe. I 
m Great entry level * 

• opportunity. Good * 

• pay, flexible hours - I 
i daytime M-R We will * 

• train right candidate. S 

: Call Charles I 
: after 1 P.M. I 



:(847) 735-4290: 



um i m i 



%? j^won 

Earn extra cash for X'mas. 
Be your cwh boss, work your 
own hours & earn up to 50% 
profrt. No door to door. Free 
gifts. Call now. Indep. Rep. 
Tina 800-303-5260 






i » i pi |l ' i n» r r'" 1 " 11 " l "»" nt 

rPRICER FOR WOMENS 
CLOTHING 

5 Days M-F. $6.00 per hour 
to start. Earn $7.00 after 30 
days by meeting store quo- 
tas. Apply at Community 

Thrift Store 

3440 W. Grand, Gumee 

No Calls 

i iiuiiiiiniiim puma 



SHIPPEDL1 

Pull, prep & stage orders 
for shipment using fork 
lift. Shifts lfe 2. S8/HR. 

ACX^NT 

(847) 726-8367 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 

$45,000 income" 

potential. 

CalM -800*51 3-4343 

Ext. B-4458 




Lettershop Floor 
Supervisor 

Experience necc. 
References Req. 
Dayshtft 7am-4pm 
Will be resp. for coordi- 
nation of jobs, employ- 
ees & machines at mid 
size mailhouse. 
Call for interview 

847-680-4545 



VERNON HHIS 
^MEDICAL OFFICE: 

New Satellite office in 

Vernon Hills seeing a 

Medical Receptionist 

Candidate must have good 

communication skills and 

willingness to work 
Saturdays. Excellent bene- 
fits and open salary. 
Previous experience pre- 
Tencd. Please call 

847-433-3460 EXT 267 



^■WtSfttWS 




UJuQ 



< H V AC * 
1 SERVICE TECH. ^ I 

^ HVAC Certified service w 
a tech. needed for k 
a busy company. w 
a Insurance & Benefits. C 

a call: I 



TELEMARKETING | 

EARN UP TO $500 1 

Extra Cash. In 

Your Pocket!! 4 

Daily Pay, no experience <| 

% necessary. Start today, '}-, 

Full or Part Time. |{ 

® MLindclein ("* 

| (847) 949-9240 | 

| Ask for Jerry & 



ASSURED 

Looking for short or long 
term temporary jobs. S7 - 
$15 hrly In Barrington, 
Hoffman Estates, Palatine, 
Schaumburg, Arlington Hts. 

Reception/Switchboard 

Fife Clerk/Data Entry 

Admin. Asst. 

Word Processing 

Call Michcle or Tami at 

(847) 381-3322 

for immediate interview. 



I CUSTOMER 
J SERVICE 

^ 25 available open- 
ft ingsll Must have pre- 
vious customer ser- 
Jvice skills, must have 
5 excellent communica- 
tion skills, and must 
A want to earn monthly 
A bonuses in addition to 
A hourly salary! Serious 
5 candidates onlyl 

Call Alex at 

J 549-9675 

A for an immediate 
A appointment 



Do you like 
cooking for a 
large family? 

New center in 
Mundelein seeking 
cook/van driver. Must 
have experience cook- 
ing in large quantities 
and following health 
department guidelines. 
Great hours/benefits. 
Call: 

(847) 970-9554 



WALK FOR PAY!. 



Hand Advertising in 
selected neighborhoods, 
Flexible hours 
Call - 




847-970-5380 



A\.AA>AAAk.A*.Ak.Jl.Ak.Al.A 

iF/T ROOFINCc 

i Exp. in all aspects of> 
* rfg. trade. t 

4 'must have own > 
j tools/transportation P 

2 * health benefits poss. £ 

3 for good people > 

4 • pay w/experience > 
4 • year round work £ 

• willing to train 
2 Also needed: £ 
4 Full time laborers > 
4 

A 



references required ^ 
• good starting pay r 

<(847) 526-2304 > 

Leave message > 

vvvwvvvwvv 




Business 
Opportunities 



OWN YOUR OWN apparel, 
-bridal, weslernwear, shoe, 
crystal/gift or S1.00 variety 
store. Includes Inventory, fix- 
tures, buying trip, training. Min- 
imum investment $16,900.00. 
Call Dan at Liberty Fashions. 
501-327-8031. 



Opportunity 
Knocks 

He're's your chance to Join 
a fast growing telecom 
munlcations co. Make 
money without losing your 
personal freedom. Call 
tod ay I 

(847)639-1375 



240 


Child Care 



ATTENTION PARENTS! 

'IS your child the most import- 
ant person to you? II so, and 
you're looking for ah excellent 
babysitter, and with a good at- 
mosphere, please call Kandy 
(847) 546-8419. Excellent ref- 
erences. Call now, I have only 
2 openings. 

CHILD CARE IN my Haryan 
Farms Home in Grayslake. All 
ages. Prices negotiable. At 
your convenience. (847) 
223-6165. 

INFANTS AND TOD- 
DLERS welcome In my home. 
References and training for 
children with special needs 
also. Helen (414) 654-1217. 

LICENSED HOME DAY 
CARE for children 6/wks to 
12yrs., 6am-11pm. Food pro- 
gram, education and fun! 
(647) 473-4753. 

LITTLE TREASURES 

HOME DAY CARE 

Has moved to Lake Villa, 

vicinity Rt. 83 & Monaville. 

'6am-6pm 

•Big fenced yard 

•Learning fun 

*15yrs. experience 

*3 Openings 

•Ages 1-5yrs, 

•Non-smoker 

•CPR/First Aide 

(B47) 356-4231. 






--.-,. 



■* » ■# >*'l»*^ ,».- 





CLASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers NovemIier 1, 1996 



I 






J 



r i 



240 



Child Care 



AU PAIR USA 

Live-in childcare. Quality, 

screened European. Legal. 

English speaking. Under 

$200 p/w. 

Amy Kritzman 
847-821-8524 

Emily Matz 
847-251-1643 



250 


School/Instruction 



TUTOR CERTIFIED ELE- 
MENTARY, all subjects K-6. 
Reasonable rates. Martena 
(847) 244-8330. 



301 


Antiques 



BOOK COLLECTORS!! 

MAKE an offer...ThB Illustrat- 
ed Do-it-yourself encyclope- 
dia, Popular Science Edition", 
copywrite 1958 12-volumes. 
Standard American Encyclo- 
pedia, copy write 1 937, Cuneo 
Press, Inc., 10-volumes. World 
Atlas 1937. Call (847) 740- 
1384 if Interested, evenings or 
leave message on machine. 



BUYERS AND SELLERS 

- come together every week 

in Lakeland Classified. 
(847)223-8161 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

ir you have placed classified 
advertising wiili the Lake 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement! 
Tram another firm request- 1 
uig payment for this ndverlls-l 
mg. To receive proper crcil-| 
It to your account, all pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Nevipapen 

PO Box 268 

30 S. Whitney Bt. 

Grayalake, IL 60030-0268 



304 


Appliances 



LOVING MOTHER OF 2 Will 
care for your child full-time In 
my Spring Grove home. Rea- 
sonable rates. Ask for Kelly 
(815)675^1172. 

MOTHER OF 2 has full time 
opening In my licensed family 
day care home. Located near' 
Grass Lake Rd. In Linden- 
hurst. Lots of love and fun. 
(647) 356-3681. 

NEED CHILD CARE? Even- 
ings/weekends. Own transpor- 
tation. Mature, experi- 
enced/references, CPR Certi- 
fied. Love kids. Call Lisa (847) 
473-5954. 

WAUKEGAN EXPERI- 
ENCED PROVIDER for 
6yrs. has lots of references 
and training. Openings for Inf- 
ants to 5yre. Michelle (847) 
599-0441 for Interview. Very 
reasonable. ^_ 

MOTHER WILL care for 
your child In my Round Lake 
home. Meals and snacks pro- 
vided. Lots of TLC. Excellent 
references. Near Village 
School. Also before and after 
school. (847) 740-0306. 



ADMIRAL WASHING MA- 
CHINE, good condition. 

SIOQ/best. (847)356-1570. 

APARTMENT SIZE PORT- 
ABLE Hoover spin dry wash- 
er. Good condition, $75. (847) 
623-4805. 

APARTMENT SIZE WHITE 
GAS STOVE, 20", $1O0/best. 
(847)263-1646. r 

HOT POINT HEAVY duty 
extra large capacity washer 
and gas dryer, 3yrs. old, 
$500/both, (847) 746-8095. 

WASHER SIGNATURE 

2000 and Kenmore electric 
dryer, white. $100/each, 
$175/set or best offer. (847) 
623-6356. 



310 


Bazaars/Crafts 



CANDY CANE LANE 
CRAFT SHOW 

Featuring hand-crafted gifts 

and accessories for the 

holidays and all year. 

Saturday, November 16th, 

9am-7pm. 

316 W. Golf Court 

Ubertyville. 



314 



Building Materials 



(2) LARGE, (1) MID-SIZE 
QUONSET Farm buildings 
remaining from Farm Pro- 
gress Show due to poor 
Weather conditions. NEW, 
NEVER ERECTED. Free stor- 
age or Immediate delivery. 
800-260-7375. 



320 



Heclronics 
Computers 



BAD BOY GAMES buy, sell 
and trade all types of video 
games: SNES, Sega Saturn, 
Nintendo 64, Play Station. Call 
Edwin at (847) 223-7567. 

MACINTOSH COMPUTER 
SPECIALIST OFFERS: 

♦Networking 

•Data Recovery 

•New & Used Computers 

'Memory Upgrades 

*Hard Disk Drives 

•Printers 

Free initial onslte consultation. 

Call (847) 395-7229. 

COMPUTER 

SERVICES 

Specializing In bolh the areas 

of computer and financial 

consulting. The computer 

services provided by POEM 

include the design and 

Installation of local area 

networks, training in most 

major software products, and 

on-site servicing of all 

hardware brands. The 

financial services provided by 

POEM Include bookkeeping 

for small to mid-size 

businesses, tax counseling, 

and personal financial 

counseling. Reasonable 

rates for all services. 

For more Information please 

call (847) 223-5068 and ask 

to speak with Kevin or Daniel, 

or FAX (847) 223-4742. 



324 



Farm Guide 



FOR SALE HAY & STRAW. 
Hay first cutting Alfalfa, $2.50 
per bale. Straw $2.00 per bale. 
Large Bales. (847) 395-8459, 
(414) 857-6477- 





BALED SHAVINGS 

Hay, Si raw & Horse Feed 
Oats, Dog Food, Cat Food & More 

HORTON BROS. 

Brislol, Wl. 
1/2 mile north of Illinois stale tine 

414-857-2525 

Delivery Available 
Mon.-Fri. 0-5 Sat. 8-3 






330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



ESTATE SALE SATUR- 
DAY 11/2, Sunday 11/3, 8am- 
5pm. 17479 W. Dartmoor Dr., 
Grayslake, Woodland Mead- 
ows Subdivision. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
is still things that Just did not 
go.,.. Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the "FREE or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGEI 
. (847) 223-8161, ext. 140. 



Barrington United 

Methodist Church 

rummage Sale 

311 S. IIouf>)i.St. a 
Thiir. 1 1 17, G:30pm-U30pm 

1-rL. 11/0, 10nm-4|iin 
1 /2 price sole, G:30prn-Upm 

$1.00 hii[; s;itc 
Contucl (047) 30 1 - 1 725 

for in for. 







BUY IT. 
SELL ft. 



RUMMAGE SALE 

Huge Rummage Sale. 

Sat., Oct. 2Gth 9am-2pm. 

North Shore Unitarian 

Church -Decrficld. 

2100 Half Day Rd. (Rt. 22) 

1 block cast of 294. 

-2 bag sale at 1:15 pm 



334 


Good Things To Eat 


EIGHT GREAT HOLIDAY 
DESSERTS. Send $4.00 & 
SAS.E. to: LB., P.O. Box 894, 
Lake Villa. III. 60046. 


338 


Horses & Tacks 



SHAVINGS 

Hay, straw, feed. 

WE DELIVERI 

(414) 857-2525, 

M-F 8-5 

Sat. 8-3. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



349 



Clothes 



349 


Clothes 



BEAUTIFUL WEDDING 
DRESS, size 12, veil also In- 
cluded. Must sell, $260/best. 
(414) 634-3257 

WEDDING GOWN SIZE 6- 
7, 4ft. Irain, with matching 
shoes. Price negotiable. (414) 
656-0213. 



350 


Miscellaneous 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 

Loveseat, Blue, Mauve, 
Cream, $575. LEATHER 
sofa and loveseat, $950. Ex- 
cellent condition, MUST SELL! 
(847)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. OAK 
bodroom set $1,200, Oak 
dlningroom sat $1,980. 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom set, 
$1,745. All in PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELLI 
(B47)548-1045. 

BLEACHED OAK DINING- 
ROOM TABLE 66X44, with 
4-chalrs, new, $450. (847) 
548-9861. 

BRASS BED QUEEN size 
Orthopedic set. Never used, 
boxed. New $800, sell for 
$275. (414) 427-8583, 

BRASS QUEEN SIZE BED 

with new deluxe mattress, still 
In plastic. $255 including 
frame. Canopy tad unique 
black wrought Iron, with new 
deluxe mattress set, $375. De- 
livery available. (847) 
374-9882. 

DAYBED, WHITE AND 

brass, complete set with mat- 
tress, pop-up trundle and link 
spring, brand new in box, 
$340. (847) 459-4430. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOME CONTENTS 

Sofa/lovoseal set, hunter 
green and cranberry, $595. 
Sofa/loveseat set, earth tones, 
$695. Other sets, plaids, 
stripes, florals, leathers, etc. 
Dlningroom set, 10-plece, 
$1,595. Bedroom sot, 6- 
piece, $995, etc. (847) 329- 
4119. 

DININGROOM SET, 
BEAUTIFUL Queen Anne 
Cherrywood, almost new 
table, chairs and china cabi- 
net. Must see. $1,750. (647) 
317-1319. 

FACTORY DIRECT 

BUNK BEDS 

SAVE BIG SSS 

Custom Built, 

Choice of colors. 

From $89.00-$1 ,500.00 

(847) 244-6157. 

MOVING SALE AUGUST 
Furniture, queen size sleeper 
couch, fur jackets, designer 
clothes (men, women, child- 
ren), toys, patio furniture and 
more. By appointment. Please 
leave message (647) 
295-9114. 

NEW KING SIZE pillow top 
mattress! extra thick, includes 
Irame and brass headboard, 
mattress and box springs, 
$500. (847) 459-5275. 

OAK ROLL TOP DESK, with 
matching leather upholstered 
chair. Excellent condition. 

$600. (647) 838-3148. 

PORTABLE CRIB WITH 
mattress. Oak with light trim, 
good condition, $l00/best. 
(847) 746-8095. 

QUEEN SIZE "PILLOW 
Top" extra thick, Includes 
Irame and brass headboard, 
mattress and box springs, 
$400. (647) 459-5275. 

SEVEN PIECE EARLY 
AMERICAN DINING SET, 
wing back easy chair, Avon 
collector plates, humidifier, 
RCA/VHS video camera, (847) 
548-1740, 



21'6" LONG ARCHED 
STEEL BRIDGE, 4|6" wide. 
Heavy duty and nice railings 
attached on both sides. $900. 
(414)857-3211. 

ART LOVER? STANDIN3 

female statue, 5ft. ceramic. 
Look of bronze. Other works 
from artist displayed through- 
out Chlcagoland and down- 
town. Asking $8,000 or trade 
for vehicle: truck, RV, ATV. Ne- 
gotlablel (647) 740-1384. 

VENDING MACHINES 11 
TABLETOPS. Three in loca- 
tions, other locations avail- 
able. Brand new condition. 
$4,400/best. (414) 857-7918 
leave message. 

LEADING HOME IM- 
PROVEMENT COMPANY 
LOOKING FOR TEN LOCA- 
TIONS IN NEED OF SIDING, 
REPLACEMENT WINDOWS, 
SWIMMING POOLS, OR SPA. 
CALL 1-800-423-8985 TO 
SEE IF YOUR HOME QUALI- 
FIES, 

LIFT MASTER 1/3HP GA- 
RAGE DOOR OPENER, 
$100/best. (647) 263-1646. 

LIFESTYLER EXERCISE 
BIKE, digital timer, $150. 
(414) 857-791 8' leave mes- 
sage. 

SEGA SATURN WITH 2- 

contfollers and 2-games. Ask- 
ing $250, (414) 862-6791 
after 3:30pm. 

SHOP EARLYI 7-1/2H. Gen- 
uine Mountain King (as seen 
on TV) Christmas tree with 
lights, extra lights, skirt, and 
more. $75 cash. (847) 526- 
8992. 

TORO SNOW THROWER, 
$65. DP Air Stridor, dual action 
walker, stepper, jogger, $95. 
(847) 587-1737 after 6pm. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 

TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/homo 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1305. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



FOR SALE 48 PIANO 
ROLLS, Old favorites and 
Christmas Songs. $160; (847) 
548-6686. _ 

KIMBALL ORGAN, MINT 
condition, $850. (847) 
587-2791. 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



UPRIGHT PIANO, GRIN- 
NELL, $500. Admiral 25cu.ft. 
refrigerator/freezer, $200. 
(847)548-6201. 



360 



Pet Supplies . 



DOG BOARDING 

Vacation In your schedule? 

I can watch your dog/pup In 

my home. 

Lots of affection for your 

"Companion". 

Fenced yard. 

Excellent references 

available. Call or leave 

message for Florence. 

(847) 966-6319. 



GERMAN SHEPHERD 

PUPPIES, AKC registered, 
born September 16, $250 
males. Richard (647) 
395-6088 after 5pm. 



FOR SALE 1995 DIA- 
MOND COLLECTION, bri- 
dal dross, sizo 16. White, 
cathedral length train, off the 
shoulder dress. Long sleeves, 
beautiful with sequins and 
pearls. Brand new headpiece 
and veil. Paid $2,000, first 
$500 takes all. Call Melodi 
(414) 889-4967. 




BY OWNER BEAUTIFUL- 
LY remodeled 3-bedrooms, 
at 1423 Woodrldge, Round 
Lake Beach. Drive by you'll 
love It! New roof, windows and 
doors. New kitchen, new elec- 
trical service and more. On an 
oversized lot, 1-1/2 car ga- 
rage. Payments less than rent, 
$79,900. (647)223-0414. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 
WILLOW RIDGE SUBDIVI- 
SION Immaculate newer 
quad-level, In quiet neighbor- 
hood, 3-bodrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, vaulted ceilings, fire- 
place, C/A, first floor laundry, 
appliances, basement, at- 
tached 2-car garage, on large 
corner lot. Available Imme- 
diately. NO BROKERS1 
$141,700, (815) 337-3448, 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
TIRED OF PAYING 
RENT? Antloch Schoolsl 
Must see this cute 2-bedroom, 
1-1/2 bath, open floor plan, 
fireplace, centra! air, updated 
interior, nice sized yard, 
fenced and landscaped. NEAR 
CHAIN OF LAKESl Low taxes! 
Great starter homel Investors 
welcome! $86,500. (B47) 
• 395-2728. 

GOVT FORECLOSED 

HOMES 

For pennies on $1. 

Delinquent Tax, Repo's, 

REO's. Your area. 

Toll Free (1) 800-218-9000 

Ext. H-9501 

for current listings, 

GURNEE TRI-LEVEL, 3- 
BEDROOM, 1-1/2 bath,- fin- 
ished lowor level, 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage, $129,900. Call Cindy 
Brefeld. Gold Star Real Estate 
(847) 548-4700. 





ALASKAN MALAMUTE 

PUPS, male & female, Cham- 
pion bloodlines, $500. (414) 
886-3302, (312) 829-6707. 

AMERICAN PITBUILL 

PUPS, very, rare purebred 
Blues, must see to believe, 
$150. (414) 279-5460. 

AQUARIUM 125 GALLON. 
Wood stand, pumps, heaters, 
plants, lights, gravel, every- 
thing you need. $550. Call 
Randy (414) 843-3764, 

COCKER PUPPIES AKC, 

shots, wormed, family raised, 
both parents, all colors, guar- 
anteed, $250, (847) 
872-3595. 

COCKER SPANIEL PUP- 
PIES black, AKC, males, 
$200. Good temperament, 
have shots. Born 8/13/96. 
Mike (414) 694-6957 a(Jer 
4pm. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
with animals? Do you have 2 
hours per week to spare? Assi- 
st Anima! Foundation, one of 
the area's no-kill shelters Is 
seeking volunteers for work 
that Is highly rewarding and 
funl . We need men and 
women who: can work with 
cats and dogs, do light repair 
work and can answer phones 
and other office duties. We are 
located In Crystal Lake. For 
more information please call 
(815)4590990. 

PUREBRED MALE CHI- 
HUAHUA at stud. Beautiful 
muscular fawn, 1-l/2yr. old, 
5 lbs. Looking for female object- 
pick of the litter. (647) 395- 
0490. 



NEW 
CONSTRUCTION 

Gitryslake Schools, 
3 Bedroom Rancrv 

Full Rnished 
Basement Priced 

for fast selL 

$106,900 

. (847) 670-1476 . 
Ik. '-A 



-.-. :V ■:.:■■ . 



WIN 

9 ROOM 

'DREAM HOUSE' 

or $150,000! 

OPEN HOUSE 
Oct, 5 & 6- 10-3 

IfiO'J Tlitt'L' O.iks Ko.nl. dry 



Come and see ihc home 
shown on TV. Over 1 500 peo- 
ple at Opan House. Need 
min. of 3000 enlries lo give 
away (he dream House! 9 
other. prizes incl, ford Escort 
or $10,000. 

847-516-3398 

Dream House 

P.O. Box 41 7 

Cary, IL 60013 




360 


Pels & Supplies 




REPTILE TANK FOR 

SALE. With heater pad and 

.screened top. $60. Call Diane 

(847) 587-1737. ._ 

PIT BULL PUPPIES, out- 
standing largB boned, reds, 
blacks. $600/and up. (815) 
653-5836. 

STUD SERVICE LOOKING 

for 'Stud Service for AKC B as- 
sert Hound. Call for more Infor- 
mation. (647) 785-9B19. 

HALF AMERICAN PIT 
BULL, 5/months K old. $100. 
(847) 746- 1 472. (414) 697- 
4127. 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or 
Parts. Also JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying CASHI Call 
(630)965-2742. 

USED 12FT. PLUS aluml- ' 
num row or John Boat. Good 
condition. $150. (708) 
447-7922 after 6om. 



500 



Homes For Sale 




WATERFRONT HOME 

LINDENHURST 10DFT. 

FRONTAGE, on 1/3 acre, 
newly remodeled, 4-bed- 
rooms, top of .the line kitchen, 
full walk-out basement, 
minutes to Gumee Mills, 
move-In condition. Priced to 
sell quickly. By owner 
' $225,000. (414) 279-5041. 

LOOKING FOR A TAX DE- 
DUCTION IN 1996? The 
best one may be your own 
home. We service II. & Wl, You 
may qualify for as little as 3% 
down. Jim Davis (800) 747- 
SS47, 

LINDENHURST, RENT TO 
BUY, only $2,000 down, buys 
beautiful 2-story, 4-bedroom, 
2-1/2 bath, familyroom, dining- 
room, fireplace, 2-car garage, 
and basement. $1,450/month. 
(647) 223-6269. 

NEW ON MARKET. BY 
OWNER. Spacious Immacu- 
late 2-story home In Linden- 
hurst on cul-de-sac. 4-bed- 
rooms, 2-1/2 baths, neutral 
decor, eat-in kitchen with pan- 
try, opening to large family- 
room with stone fireplace. Ap- 
pliances stay, full basement, 
privacy fence, 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage. S5K under realtors price. 
Share commission savings 
with US, $174,500. (847) 
356-6029. 



GRAYSLAKE NEWER 2- 
STORY, 3-bedroom home, 
2.1 baths, full basement, 2-car 
garage, C/A. By Owner 
$182,500. (847) 546-7735, 

NO DOWNPAYMENT? NO 

PROBLEMl Build on your lot, 
NOW, without 20% downpay- 
ment most banks demand, 
100% construction & perma- 
nent financing If qualified, 
Miles Homes, 1 -800-343- ' 
28S4 EXT. L 

RENT TO OWN LAKE VU- 
LA, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
large eat-In kitchen, finished 
lower level, 2-1/2 car, wooded 
lot with deck, great neighbor- 
hood. $995/month. (847) 
436-1012. 

RENT TO OWN ROUND 
LAKE spacious 3-bedroom, 
2-bath, has all upgrades In- 
cluding huge kitchen, with cus- 
tom cabinets, sunroom, fin- 
ished .walk-out basement with 
office, 2-car, fenced yard, 
great neighborhood, 

$995/monlh. (847) 438-1012. 

SAVE 6% REAL Estate com- 
mission, buy direct from own- 
er. 1-home, immediate occu- 
pancy. 1 to be completed. Sell- 
• Ing for below appraised value. 
Gorgeous view of golf course, 
ponds and mature trees. 
Great location, walking dis- 
tance to shopping with side 
walks and curbs. Tandem En- 
terprises (414) 877-9750. 



ONE BEDROOM 
APARTMENTS 

Only 3 Left To Choose From! 

•Flexible Leasing 
•Convenient to Melra 

Call about our mg& 

Credit 



Fall special... 



ice* 




AI'AR T M l-NTS 



Be One OfThe Lucky Ones!!! 

847-395-0949 

HWY. 03 & 
North Ave. 



WkAj's New 

.OnTKe 

MarI(et 



BEAUTIFUL BRICK 
HILLSIDE RANCH 

On 5/4 Aera In Bradi Park. 
Too miny immcnliiis to llvll 

$198,000 
Call Ann Tyra 

far showing 

CENTURY 21 KNOX 

847-374-9525 



■r 



Beach Park 
Executive Home f 
w/ In Law 

I Arrangement! { 

| Breath-Taking i 

1 1.7 Acres, winding* 
% crcck,- ravine, heavily $ 
i treed; '} 

%A bedrooms, 2 baths, 2$ 
| fireplaces; new furnace,! 



i central air, hardwood?' 
* floors, sun porch 
fl'ull basement-3 cart' 
parage » ;* 

w 



I! One" bedroom loft | 
{; rental over garage-was % 
| recently undated 
| Asking-$2 19,900 

CORNERSTONE $ 

REALTY 
ASK 4 BRENDA 

847-872-1515 
847-872-8998 



ocll A HOME/BUY A 
HOME. If selling, we have a 
number of interested buyers; If 
Interested In purchasing you 
may qualify for as little as 3% 
.down. Servicing It. & Wl. Jim 
Davis, (800) 747-5547, 

TAX BREAK RENTING 

doesn't do It so why not get out 
of an apartment Into your own 
home? You may qualify for as 
little as 3% down. Servicing II. 
& Wl, Jim Davis (800) 747- 
5547. . 

TIRED OF RENTING? A 

home Is In your reach with as 
little as 3% down for qualified 
buyers. Servicing II. & Wi. Jim 
Davis (800) 747-5547. 

UNION GROVE 1206 High 
St. 2500 plus executive Cape 
Cod, 3-bedrooms plus, In- 
ground pool, double lot, Jacuz- 
zi. Motivated seller, $159,900. 
(4141878-4767. 
INGLESIDE 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH completely renovat- 
ed. 2-full new baths, full base- 
ment, new roof, furnace, C/A 
and kitchen. New electrical, 
plumbing and windows. On 
wooded 1/2 acre corner lot. 5 
minutes North of Baxter, 
34612 Wilson Rd. (847) 
546-2558. 

INTEREST BREAK HOME 
owners use equity to pay off 
high Interest obligations. Bet- 
ter than paying high rates on 
credit cards or other bills and 
get the tax benefit. Jim Davis 
(800) 747-5547 Servicing II. & 
Wl. 



i 



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NovemBer 1 , 1 996 LAkelANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED I. 



'1SHER AND FISHER FILE NO, 28651 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
feMAC Mortgage Corporation of PA, Plaintiff, VS. Cole Taylor 
Jank asT/U/T #94-6077, Mary Ried and Midland Savings Bank, 
-SB Defendants. Case No. 96 C 031 1. Judge Bucklo 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE, OUR FILE 
^n, 2B6S1, (IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 
CONSULT THEIR flWM ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 
FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on May 31, 1996. 

We, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special 
Commissioner for this court will on November 20, 1996 at the 
hour of 1:30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Courthouse, 18 
N. County SL, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: c/k/a 1567 Grove, 
Highland Park, IL 60035 Tax JD# 16-27-401-014 

The improvements on the property consist of a two story, 
wood frame, single family dwelling 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified, funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open lor Inspection. 

The Judgment amount was $199,649.90. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate ol Sale which will enable the purchaser to a deed on 
a specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to 
Iqw 

For information, call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and FIsheY, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is qqI required to provide additional information other than 
that set forth in this Notice. 






FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 2BB02 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Norwest Mortgage, Inc., Plaintiff, VS. Charles A. Edwards, 
Defendants. Case No. 96 C 0834. Judge Castillo 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 26802 

(TT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 

THEIR QWHATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLO- 

SURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 

entered In the above entitled cause on June 27, 1996. 

I, Edward .Grossman, Special Commissioner for this court 
will on November 20, 1996 at the hour of 1:00 p.m. at the front 
door of Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County St., Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described 
premises: 

c/k/a 129 Adams, Fox Lake, IL 60041. 
Tax ID* 05-14-105-002. - 

The Improvements on the property consist ol a single family 

dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject 1o 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The Judgment amount was S1 24, 146,47. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will enlltle the purchaser to a Deed on a 

•[jooniod data unioeo tho property Is rodoomod according to law. 
For Information, coll tho Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Aitornoy, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago. Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer Is nol required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



'.':•■'! 






FISHER AND FISHER . FILE NO. 29082 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FORTHE NORTH- 
ERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS, EASTERN DIVISION 
Home Savings of America, FSB f/k/a Home Savings of America, 
F.A., Plaintiff, VS. Lenard W. Eaker and Jill H. Eaker, Defendants. 
Case No. 96 C 1860. Judge Shadur. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE.,OJUTiFJLE 
NO. 29082. (IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 
CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 
FORECLOSURE SALES). 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on July 26, 1996. 

I, Thomas Johnson and Tina Douglas, Special 
Commissioner for this court will on November 20, 1996 at the 
hour of 1:30 p.m. at the front door of Lake County Courthouse, 18 
N. County SL, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 551 Ravina Road, Highland Park, IL 60035 
Tax Id # 16-25-307-003 

The improvements on Ihe property consist of single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount was $334,127.37. 

Upon the sale being made, the purchaser, will receive a 

Certificate of Sate which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on a 

specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's Attorney. 

Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 

4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 

Officer Is not required to provide additional Information other than 

that set forth In this Notice. 



504 



Homes For Rent 



504 



Homes For Rent 



t-OX LAKE 2-BEDROOM, 
1-BATH HOME, 1-car ga- 
rage, full finished basement, 
all appliances Included, newly 
ronovated. Available Novem- 
ber . 15th. No pets. 
$800/month. (647) 356-5719. 



CHAIN O' LAKES Lakefront, 
year round home in Anlloch, 
Quiet. 5 rms, 1.-1/2 baths, ga- 
rage, basement. Long or short 
lerm rental. No Pets, Reason- 
able. (708) 863-1122. * 



-> 



HALF MONTH FREE 
RENT, 2-bedroom cottage on 
Pettite Lake, $625 & 675, In- 
cludes heat. References and 
security deposit required. No 
dogs. (847) 395-5045. 



500 



Homes For Sale 




WAUCONDA 3-BED- 

ROOMS, 2-BATHS, fairly 
large kitchen, partial base- 
ment, washer/dryer, 
$900/month. (847) 526-2612. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

Harmony Village 

Adult Community 

2-BEDROOM, 2-BATH, 

large 1-1/2 car garage, 

$795/month. 

1-BEDROOM, 1-BATH, 

large 1-1/2 car garage, 

$695/month. 

No pets. 

Security deposit. 

(847) 526-5000. 

WAUKEGAN VICTORIAN 
SETTING 1 -bedroom apart- 
ments, $450 and up. (847) 
336-0144. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE 

NO. 29073 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

FORTHE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

EASTERN DIVISION 

Federal National Mortgage Association, Plaintiff, Vs. Guenlher 

Pickney a/k/a Guenter Piekny and Mariana Plckney a/k/a 

Marlene Piekny, State Bank of the Lakes, Defendants. Case No 

96 C 2004. Judge Llndberg 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 29073 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
THEIR OWN ATTORNEY'S BEFORE BIDDING AT FORE- 
CLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on Jul y 25.. 1996. . 

I, Stephen Nagy, Special Commissioner for this court will 
on November 22, 1 996 at the hour of 1 1 :00 am at the front door 
of Lake County Courthouse Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the high- 
est bidder for cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 616 Plumtree Ln., Antioch, IL 60002 
Tax ID #02-07-401-122 

The Improvements on the property consist of two story 
wood framed single family dwelling with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 
24 hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject 
to general taxes and to special assessments. - . 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection. 
The Judgement amount was SI 84,000.08. 
Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle Ihe purchaser to a Deed on 
a specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to 
law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiff's 
Attorney, Fisher and fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois 
(312) 372-4784 from 1:00pm to 3:00pm. Under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer is not required to provide additional Information 
other than that set forth In this Notice. 



RSHER AND FISHER RLE NO. 28872 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FORTHE 
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 
Home Savings of America, FSB, Plaintiff, VS, Robert Feiger and 
Alyson Miller Felger, United States of America. Defendants. Case 
No. 96 C 1240. Judge Llndberg 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NQ. 28872 
(IT IS ADVISEDTHAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT 
THEIR QMi ATTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT FORECLO- 
SURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on August 16, 1996. 

I, Stephen Nagy, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 22, 1996 at the hour of 1 1:00 a.m. at the front door ol 
Lake County Courthouse, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 
c/k/a 1411 Stratford Rd.. Deeriield, IL 60015. 
Tax ID #16-29-106-017. 

The Improvements on the property consist of a single family, 
brick construction, 2 story home with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general (axes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The Judgment amount wa3 $227,430.38. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate ol Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed on e 
specified dato unless the property Is redeemed according to taw. 

For Information call the Sales Olficor at Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law, the Sales 
Officer is not required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



FISHER AND FISHER FILE NO. 28850 

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FORTHE 

NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION 

First Indiana Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, VS. Jeffrey A. Batio, Stephen 

G. Hearn and Stanley Hearn; Defendants. Case No. 96 C 1081. 

Judge Conlon. 

NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE OUR RLE 

NO. 28850 . (IT IS ADVISEDTHAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR OWN A TTORNEYS BEFORE BIDDING AT 

FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered In the above entitled cause on June 27 , ,19,96, 

I. Michael Poletle, Special Commissioner for this court will on 
November 29, 1996 at the hour of 2:00 p.m. at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse, 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, 
Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described 
premises: 

c/k/a 1437 St. Johns Ave., Highland Park, IL 60035 

Tax ID #16-27-207-014 

The Improvements on the property consist of a single family 
dwelling. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds, The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgement amount was $83,327.65. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle Ihe purchaser to a Deed on a 
specified date unless Ihe property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer as Plaintiff's Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Under Illinois law. the Sales 
Officer is QDi required to provide additional Information other than 
that set forth In this Notice. 



504 


Homes For Rent 



504 



Homes For Rem 



NEAR LAKE ELIZABETH, 
TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN, very clean, newly remo- 
deled 3-bedroom, C/A, large 
2-1/2 car attached garage, 
laundry room. Available 12/1. 
$B00/month plus security. For 
appointment (708) 453-1579. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 
RENT WITH OPTION TO 
BUY, 4-bedrooms, 2-baths, 

Jaccuzzi, woodburnlng slove. 
washer/dryer, stove/refrigera- 
tor, fenced-in yard. Immediate 
occupancy, $800/month. 
(847) 546-0849. 

SMALL COTTAGE FOR 
RENT. A 1 -person dwelling. 
No pets and non-smoker. 
$550/monlh, plus security de- 
posit. Includes all utilities. 
Available November 1, 1996. 
(847) 223-0729 leave mes- 
sage. 



INGLtSIDE AREA, 1-1/2 
bedroom, completely refur- 
bished. $650/month, 1yr. 
lease, $850 security deposit. 
Immediate occupancy Novem- 
berlst, (847)587-7551. 

LAKEFRONT 2-STORY 

HOUSE, 4-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, heat, appliances, car- 
pet and mini-blinds, 
$850/mon(h plus $1,000 se- 
curity deposit. (847) 
395-5045. 

WINTHROP HARBOR, 1- 
BEDROOM home in very 
quiet area, (847) 336-5955. 

ZION NEW' 3-BEDROOM 
housB, full basement, fenced 
yard. No Section 8. 
$795/monlh plus utilities. 
(847) 872-7944, (847) 872- 
4954. 



504 


Homes For Rent 



518 


.Mobile Homes 



WAUCONDA 2-BEDROOM 
HOME, center of town loca- 
tion', with heated garage. 
$710/month, references and 
security deposit required. No 
pels. (847) 526-7136. 



508 



Homes Wanted 



ON DISPLAY 1,760SQ.FT. 

manufactured home. Can -go 
on any land zoned residential. 
Only $57,500, Includes deliv- 
ery and setup. On display at 
7160 S. 27th St., Oak Creek, 
Wise. (414)761-1418. 

t s 



THREE BEDROOM 

HOUSE NEEDED IMME- 
DIATELY!! Section 8 ap- 
proved. Call after 2pm. (847) 
546-5842. 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



FOR RENT AVAILABLE 
IMMEDIATELY. In Antioch 
spacious 2-bedroom town- 
house with large closets, 1-1/2 
baths, appliances, C/A, laun- 
dryroom in basement with 
washer and gas dryer hook- 
up, plus 2-car garage with 
opener. Close to schools and 
shopping. $925/month, first 
and last months rent plus se- 
curity deposit. No pets. Refer- 
ences needed. (847) 356- * 
2417 leave message. 

FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM, 

1-bath condo, Just remodeled, 
with all appliances, lake rights, 
pool, , ready to move In, 
3600/month, possible lease 
option, (847) 265-8737. 

FOX LAKE TOWNHOME 
FOR RENT, WOODHILLS 
BAY, 2-bedroom, ,1-1/4 bath, 
fireplace, garage, A/C, pool, 
washer/dryer, lake access. 
$800/month. (815) 675-9097. 

FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 
CONDO FOR RENT, 2-bed- 
rooms, 2-tull baths, pool, boat 
slips available. Adult communi- 
ty. No pets. Security deposit 
required. Available Immediate- 
ly, S750/month, (847) 
587-3193. 

HEBRON-ZION 2124, 3- 
BEDROOMS, living- 
room/kitchen, basement, 1- 
1/2 baths. S575/month plus 
$475 security deposit. (847) 
244-^3693. 

NEW CONSTRUCTION 

LAKE VILLA TOWNHOUS- 
ES FOR SALE, 2-bedrooms, 
with loft, 2-baths, fireplace, 
C/A, garage, much morel 

(847) 223-1290. 

LUXURY BRICK 2-BED- 
ROOM TOWNHOME 1-1/2 
baths, eat-in kitchen, near 
lake and train in Grayslake. 
- I350sq.fi., plus basement, 
A/C, huge master bedroom, 
$850/month. Available 12/1. 
(847) 223-7296. 

ONE BEDROOM CONDO 
IN FOX LAKE FOR RENT, 
24hr. security, no pets. Call 
after 4pm (647) 356-1132. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
TOWNHOUSE 2-bedroom, 1- 

1/2 baths, fireplace, 
$725/month. (847) 818-1038. 




2 Large Bedrooms 

2 Full Baths 

Patio Door & Deck 

+ Extras 

538,000 

Call (847) 62S-1389 



520 



518 


Mobile Homes 



1989 OAKWOOD 14X60, 3- 

bedrooms, 2-full baths, C/A, 
10x20 covered porch. Shed, 
fenced yard, approved to stay 
on Navy lot. (B47) 689-1149. 

FOR SALE 16X80 MOBILE 
HOME in Rainbow Lake 
Manor. Uved-ln lyr. Moving 
out of state. 2-bedrooms, 1- 
1/2 baths, fully carpeted, all 
appliances, deck and shed. 
Priced 10 sell. (414) 857-2891. 

MOBILE HOME WITH 
fenced yard, deck and storage 
building. In Winlhrop Harbor 
Park. (847) 336-5955. 

MODULARS *DOU- 

BLEWIDES *SIN- 

GLEWIDES TWO STORY 
MODULAR ON DISPLAY!' 
FOUNDATIONS *BASE- 

MENTS 'GARAGES WELLS 
•SEPTIC. WE DO IT ALU 
FREE STATEWIDE DELIV- 
ERY/SET. RILEY MANUFAC- 
TURED HOMES 1-800-790- 
1541. 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



Apartments For Rent 



FOX LAKE LARGE water- 
front, nice location, 1-bed- 
roorh apartment, heat/water 
included, A/C, laundry facili- 
ties. (847)662-0034. 

IMPERIAL TOWER 4 
IMPERIAL MANOR 
QUIET BUILDINGS 
LARGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

LARGE CLOSETS 

PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (847) 244-9222. 



, ,»»»»» ♦ > » m » m »♦«»♦ 



IMPERIAL TOWER 

& IMPERIAL MANOR 

Quiet Buildings 

Large Spacious Apartments 

Air Conditioniog 

Private Balconies 

Large Cfoscis 

Privacy Walls 

Convenient Laundry Facilities 

Call 

(847) 244-9222 

i i iMi i mn 



DEEP LAKE 
HERMITAGE 

SPACIOUS 1 

BEDROOM SUITES 

. • Free gas heat, 
cooking & water 

• Air conditioner in 
each unit 

• Wall-to-wall carpeting 

• Ample closet space 

• Appliances included 

• Tennis & basketball 
courts 

• Laundry facilities in 
building ^^^ 

$54*5 smssst 

149 N. Milwaukee 

Lake Villa, IL 

(847) 356-2002 



Calling All Military 
Personnels 

You are to report immedi- 
ately to Waterford Place for 
a great deal on 1 bedroom 
Apartments! Call today! 

(847) 746-2211 



*_. — ■ *« . 



STATIONSIDE 
VILLAGE 

5215 11TH AVENUE 
KENOSHA, WI 

Luxurious Living 

Apartments & Townhouscs 

2 bedroom - 2 baths 

Mini Blinds 

Appliances 

Garages Available , 

Elevators No Pets 







LARGE NICE 1-bedrobm 
dpartment, $495/month plus 
utilities. Sit. II 1-bsdroom 
apartment, $495/month in- 
cludes all utilities. Both avail- 
able Immediately. Fox , 
Lake/Spring Grove area. (847) 
223-3257. 

NEWLY REMODELED 1- 
BEDROOM APARTMENT 
IN ROUND LAKE BEACH. 
SENIORS WELCOME. Gas 
and water Included.. 
S535/month. Pager (847) 210- 
9508. 

ZION SPACIOUS 1-BED- 
ROOM, S425/MONTH plus 

utilities, available 11/1. (B47) 
872-8241. ■ 

ZION EAST SIDE VAL- 
UES, large studio, 1, 2, or 3 
bedroom, S390-S675. Section 
8 not available. No pets. Mili- 
tary clause. (847) 831-5388. 

GRAYSLAKE 2-BED- 
ROOM APARTMENT, off 
street parking, great location. 
S650/month plus utilities. 
Available now. (847) 
205-1684. 

INGLESIDE 6-ROOM 
APARTMENT, plus garage, 
basement, yard, heat fur- 
nished, $7O0/monlh plus se- 
curity deposit and references. 
Available immediately. (847) 
587-5827. 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS, Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake Vil- 
la. $575 and S700/month. 
Heat water, air included. 
(847)356-5474. 




FREE HEAT 

Appliances - Cusan Blinds 

On-site Manger • No Pels 




At mMiwx** 

it is §<&m what 

some people are 

paying for rent! 

Give us a call and 

you will find that 

you don't have to 

be haunted to have 

an apartment. No 

tricks... just treats! 

Call today '„ 



The American Apartments 
1 -2 & 3 bedroom Apts 

$485 to $695/mo 

Townhouse 3 bedroom 

1 1/2 bajh, full basement 

$800 per month 

(15 minutes to Base) 

847-249-1889 



TIRED OF 
RENTING? 

A home is in your reach 
with as little as 3% down 
for qualified buyers 
Servicing IL &WI. Jim 
Davis. 



Call (414) 656-1010 | I ( 8Q Q) 747-5547 




Water's Edge 
Apaortments 

2 bedroom; 

FREE Gas Heat, Cooking & Water 

Spaciously Designed Apartments 

Fully Equipped Picture Window Kitchens 

250 S. Rt. 59 • Fox Lake ^s^ 



■Ouumutm 
OWHtUWTT 






- • — ' 



•t • ■'■'.' 



::<ss 




■""-j t: 



CLASSiFIED UkslANd Newspapers November 1, 1996 



528 



Aptyiiomes 
To Share 



568 



Out Of Area Property 



568 



Out of Area 
Property 



568 



Out of Area 
Property 



YOUNG PROFESSION- 
*ALS SEEK M/F, for non- 
smoking co-ed house. Small 
pet OK. $325 plus 1/4. (847) 
526-3203. 



530 



Rooms For Rent 



WAUCONDA/FOX RIVER 
VALLEY GARDENS, l-per- 
son sleeping room, with kitch- 
en facilities. Mais. Non- 
smoker. S75/week, 
$270/month. (847) 639^8979. 



Fox Lake Area 

Rooms for rent. Heat 

& util. incl. Private 

shower. $90.00 

weekly plus sec. dep. 

req. No pets. Call 

587-0635, if no ans. 

leave message. 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



FOX LAKE OFFICES FOR 
RENT, located In central 
downtown. Deluxe, with car- 
peting, off street parking, 
(708) 452-5738 after 3:30pm. 



CASTLE ROCK LAKE Per- 
fect settings for all types of re- 
creational fun. Property comes 
with a private boat dock. 6.3 
acres at $14,950. Four Sea- 
sons Realty of Central Wl 800- 
335-2420. 

WILD WEST RANCH IN So,. 
Colorado, 55ac - $39,900. Mix 
of beautiful woods & rolling 
fields w/spectacular bluffs and 
mountain views. Year round 
access w/telephone & electric. 
Exc. financing. Call now 719- 
485-0656 Red Creek. 
iiiiimmiMMii 

H.LAGUHA BEACH, 
CAUFORH1A 

Oceanfront Home Estatel 
Sale. Locatlon'Locatlon. 
This one of a kind Whitewa- 
ter site Is a 13,800 sf sloping 
lot on a small southerly-fac- 
ing cove w/only a few steps 
to access the sand'& surf. 
Comfortable airy 2740 sf 
home has 3BR/3BA w/att 
guest qrtrs & 3c-gar 
detachod. S2.75M. Detailed 
brochure Bvl. 714-494-2345 
principals only, Owner 
Broker handling. 



MISSOURI-UNIQUE 97 
ACRES. Recreation Retirement! 

{Retreat Great vu overtkg Lake J 
Stockton in Missouri. Utilities. | 
Area Is Sportsman's paradise, j 
J For individual development orj 
Investment. $275,000. by| 
.owner. (417) 27&w»536. 

^OLORADO^ 

35 to 80 ac Homesteads nr 
CO Springs In exc horso 
entry. Prlcod from $125K- 
195K. Each homestead site 
ts superbly fenced, incl 
attractive entrance w/16' 
gato. Protective covenants 
assure the best of country liv- 
ing at Mueller Ranch. Call for 
color brochuro: 
UoO-717-5869/719-749-2000 J 



!; SEAISLA3MD ■': 
;I AREA,GA i; 

•I For sale by Owner. Opptyofa >', 
I» lirellme-Pvt Mac Island t J 
|i Own a beau I semi-tropical Ji 
»J island far the same price you <J 
|t wouMpayforawtrfmtlot. ,J 
•! Fisherman's paradise in Uie |< 
J | heart of the breeding ground ij 
[i for millions of fish & shellfish. !; 
<J Decpwtr. dose access to J ( 
J' lntracoaslalwirway& ocean, ij 
J I If Interested better art immed! Jj 
i! Chvncn 'i 

I; 910-J63-2S23 : 






708 



Snowmobiles/ATV's 



HO 

1 



BUSINESS 



INDUSTRIAL SPACE 



FOUNTAIN HEAD 
8 CORPORATE CENTER | 



S 



On RL 12 in RICHMOND j 

Superior 2,650 sq. ft. and g 
5,100 sq.ft. unit. 
Overhead door/dock. 3 
_ A/C Office. $995-S1,990. ! 
[ LAND MANAGEMENT | 

I 815-678-4771 a 



ARKANSAS 

Waterfront Estate, 1,000 
Waterfront on 18 ac. point 
overlkg 30,000 ac. Beaver 
Lake, Rogers, Ark. 15 poten- 
tial homesites. 3200' architect 
designed home, guest house. 
Owner transferred, will help 
with financing. Won't lastl 
Price reduced $21,000 to only 
$398,000. (501) 925-2745 or 
(800) 484-2839 ext. 6166. 



SNOWMOBILE 1990 SKI 
Doo Formula Mach 1, low 
miles, very clean, very fast, 
$2,400. (847) 395-2112 even- 
Ings. __ 

SNOWMOBILES 1989 SKI- 
DOO Mach f. 1990 Skidoo 
Formula Plus. Boih with new 
engines. Plus, like new 2- 
place trailer. Helmets includ- 
ed. $4,000 takes all! Must Soil! 
(414) 552-2699 home, (414) 
947-9397 work. 



I 



is 
GEORGIA 

For Lease. Ofc Space - 
Light Mfg or Lab Space, 
12,500' sq, fully sprin- 
kled. D1S approved - 
loe'd in The Park, 
Warner Robins, GA. 1 
nil to Robins AFB, 
among 20 ofc suites 
consisting of lOOKsf 
space leased to Hi Tech 
Industries. 

912-923-5350 

for information 

"1 



ysi 



BUY IT. 
SELL IT. 



M. 



Boat/MotorVEtc. 



710 



Boat/Molors/Elc 



1 MINNESOTA 

■ FSDO, Corp/lmfiv. flclroal. 307 j 
:OC. of prime hunting ground, bor- J 
jdoring tho Big Slono Nail Wildlife j 
jRefugo & 2 mi. of Iho Minnesota i 
: River, Exc fishing, waterfall & : 
idoor hunting Inds Hso, well & out- j 
ibldgs. Contract for deed vv/easy | 



BaaaaaBaaaaHBaaaaaataaaaHHaHHaHaHHaaaaaaBg 

iDRY, HEATED STORAGE | 

SSecure, rural Grayslake location, per-3 
gfect for boats and cars. Will be kept a| 
Sconstant 55 degrees throughout the* 
Iwinter. 3 month minimum, approx. $90| 
|per month depending on size. Keepg 



GRAYSLAKE 
ATE SHOPS for rent, (1) 
1200sq.ft., (1) 900sq,tt. Please 
call tor Information (847) 
223-5353. 

INDUSTRIAL BUILDING 
5,0Q0SQ.FT. In Round Lake, 
at $5.00 per sq.ft. Bnnually. 
(847) 223-0022. 

LAKE ZURICH DOWN- 
TOWN, eoosq.fi., store or of- 
fice, $920/month. (847) 
438-7427 days, (847) 359- 
5495 evenings. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- 
ROLLINS RD. 7500sq.it. vac- 
ant lot zoned C-3. Ideal for car 
lot or lawn and garden equip- 
ment. Call Boh (B47) 
381-6966. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- 
ROLLINS ROAD. 2900sq.ft. 
A/C/heat/offices. Ideal contrac- 
tor, distributor, repair shop or 
storage. $875. Call Bob (B47) 
381-6966. 



S5SI i^3^2^7?tf= a : lyour baby happy this winter, 



ARKANSAS 

Beaver Lake, beaut, lakefront 
home, 5br. 4 1/2blh, native 
slone bar, spa, pool table, 3 
tplcs. 2700 sf. deck, 24x24 
scrnd porch, $345,000. By 
Owner. 50V925-2675 or 1 250 
(MS) tor details. 



WYOMINC 

CorpTlndfv. Retreat. Low crime, 
No stale income tax. Creek, 
mtns., hot spring nearby, land- 
ing strip poss. Swim, fish, hunt, 
explore. 300 acs.w/addl land 
avail. $325,000. By Owner. 
307-867-2421 tor details. 



Call Bill for more information. 

(847) 223-8161- 



a 
a 
a 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



804 



Cars For Sale 



laaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaB 

MUST SELLl NO ROOM 
TO STORE! 20ft. 1973 
Browning Boat wilh trailer. 
300merc engine, open bow/trl- 
hui). Must see to appreciate, 
$3,500/best. Call after 5pm. 
(847) 973-1848. 



560 



Vacant Lol/Acrcagc 



% FIRST TIME ADVER- 
* TISED fully Improved 
10,500sq.ft. (70'x150 r ) mln. 
Vacant single family bulldable 
lots, immediately available on 
Avllon Avenue in Round Lake, 
Illinois. (7) Seven lots remain- 
ing in Falcon Woods II Unit II 
Subdivision. Perfect for small 
builders and spec houses. 
$25,000 non wooded lots. 
$27,000 wooded lots. (Will ne- 
gotiate only on (5) lot package 
and closing by December 
15th, 1996). No Realtors. Con- 
tact David Peregrin (847) 
740-1103. 



WISCONSIN 

I By pwner. Big Cedar Lake 
Luxury Home & Cottage. 2 stry 
exposed tower level, 4bf, 3 1/2 
bin, wooded tot in quiet bay area 
2 tptcs, wet bar, rec area, upper 
.deck, tower patio & boat hse 
I deck overlkg lake. $507,900. 
414-644-8572 fo r Info Jdetolls. 

HMWWMPH 

ICASPER, WYOMINGl 

[Luxury livingl Custom homol 

lw/5800 st. toe'd on golt oourse.l 
[Panoramic view ot mtns, door fil 
I antelope play In back yardll 
[$595,000. Call fcy brochure." 

Real Properties, Inc. 
1 1-800-640-3565 far further Info. | 

HHMMI 



SAFE AND SECURE IN- 
SIDE STORAGE with police 
and fire protection for Boats, 
Cars and RV's. Only $18 a 
fool. Motorcycles and Waver- 
unners only $125. Pick up and 
delivery available. (847) 
358-2747. 

SEARAY RUNABOUT 

21 FT. Excellent running con- 
dition. Newly overhauled, Test 
run at Selective Marine, Fox 
Lake. $2,000 Includes trailer. 
(847) 587-5122. 



720 


Sports Equipment 



564 



Resort/Vacation 
Rentals 



ARIZONA- RANCH- 

GIVEAWAY. 3.00Ot act Dorian) I 

Otfcarua Natl Fst. S£ AZ. Small 
ranch too, 3 wots, 21 troo orchard, | 
Remote boon rrta seeing. Vstal 

views, pvey, god potential as al 
retroal or dovlpmL IncrodUo valuol 
SOT5.000. Karen 505-567.2242, | 
Century 21 -1 st American. 



AB ROLLER PLUS TRAIN- 
ER, (as seen on TV), with 
video and exercise pad. Brand 
new $135. Sell for $75/best. 
(847) 973-0342, 

HEALTHMAX TREAD- 

MILL, FOR SALE, 2yre. old, 
In superb condition, used max- 
imum 5 times, $300/best. 
(847)548-1838. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



804 



Cars For Sale 



BUICK 1986 LESABRE sta- 
tion wagon, $700/best. (414) 
658-0832. 

CHRYSLER LEBARON 
GTC CONVERTIBLE 
1994, V6, forest green with 
Ian top/Interior, now top, ABS, 
A/C, air bags, 7/70 warranty, 
mint, low miles, $11,700/best. 
(847) 548-6560. 

FORD TAURUS 1994, 4- 
door, air, power wind- 
ows/locks, cassette. 72,000 
miles, excollent condition, 
$8,900. (847) 655-0257. 

MAZDA 1992 626DX, 25K 
miles, 1 -owner, 5-speed, A/C, 
$10,200. (847) 662-8012. • 

MUST SELL. 1988 Beretta 

'GT, V6, black, all power, 

' 117K, good condition, 

$2,500/besl. (847) 587-6999. 

PONTIAC 1980 GRAND 
PRIX, started restoration 
work, have another car for 
part. Both for $700/best. (414) 
654-9574 or 230-1399 pager. 

PONTIAC CATALINA 

CONVERTIBLE 1968, 1- 

owner, bought new. Beautiful 
condition. Must see. (847) 740- 
4485. 

TOYOTA PREVIA 1991, 
A/C, power windows/locks, 
good condition, $8,000/bost. 
(847) 263-8878. 




DISNEY VACATION AREA 
1 , 2 & 3 bdrm condos, suites & 
homes as low as $39/nt. AT- 
TRACTIONS: 800-749-4045 
axl, 115-IL899. http://www.ln- 
tersrv.com/mba 

FT. MYERS BEACH, fur- 
bished 2-bedroom mobile 
home, waterfront, with boat 
dock, deck, and Lanal, C/A, 
heat, telephone and cable in- 
cluded. $400/week (minimum 
2/weeks), or $1,100/month. 
November, December, Janu- 
ary. (941)463-0283. 



KANSAS 

Prime Aa/teuriiiral InvoslmonL 
9300 ac Irrigated & dryland farm, 
owned/operated by samo family 
sanoa 1909. Primo land w/exe water 
rights. Com yields in excess of 200 
bushol/ac. Can yield In excess of 
10% return. Colorado Land Invmt I, 
LLC. Larry J, Hoslotlor, Bkr. 
719-346-8661. Cthor farms avail. 



1970 OLDS 
CONVERTIBLE. 
$6,000. Will go 
(847) 487-7743. 



CUTLASS 

Value 
$5,000/bost. 



1973 PRO-STREET 

NOVA, chassis work com- 
plete, many oxtra parts. 
$4,750/best. (815) 385-^859. 



WISCONSIN 

JANESVILLE- Rtverfront 
property. 2100 st. homo, 3br, 
3blh, cath. ceiling, frplc, upper 
& lower 2 1/2 car att. gar. 
19x10 cabin. Close to 1-90. 
Near shopping. $245,900. By 
Owner. 608-754-2709. 



1981 TRANS AM, 

$1,200/best. Call Alex (847) 
546-5895. 



1986 CORVETTE RED 
Coupe, 15,000 actual miles, 
Immaculate condition, must 
see. Evenings after 6pm (847) 
395-2112. 

1988 FORD FESTIVA, 
great on gas, looks and runs 
good, $900/best. (847) 
731-3845. 

1990 CHEVY CAVALIER 
COUPE, great condition, 
56,000 miles, air, cruise, 5- 
speed, $3,250, silver. (B47) 
623-5721. 

1991 BLACK GEO STORM, 
automatic, A/C, power steer- 
ing/brakes, cassette radio, 
hlah miles, $2,500. (847) 

395-6911. ■ 

1991 CAMARO V8, T-tops, 
air, automatic, full power, 
AM/FM cassette player, 
33,200 miles. Like new. 

Sa.OOO/firm. (414) 551-8969. 

1991 EAGLE TALAN T.S.I., 
50K, runs great, sharp car, 
$6,800/best. (847) 543-8089 
leave message. 

1991 GEO METRO. Must 

sell immediately! High miles, 
excellent runner, $2,500. 
(815)653-3823. 

1891 HONDA CIVIC 

HATCHBACK, A/C, sunroof, 
AM/FM cassette, now tires, 
low mlleago, original owner, 
$6,250. Antloch. (847) 872- 
6394 days, (847) 838-0838 
evenings. 

1993 GEO TRACKER, 5- 
speed, rod, new top, 70,000 
miles. Looks good. 

$6,S0Q/best. (847) 578-5423. 



1am FORD F-100 PICK- 
UP Unibody (very rare), very 
good condition, $2,000. (414) 
654-7411. 

1967 MERCURY COUGAR 
GT 390, needs paint, 
$2,000/best, (847) 566-7267. 

1968 CUTLASS 442, white 
with gold stripe, spoiler, beau- 
tiful condition, $6,000. (414) 
654-7411.. 

BUICK 1973 CENTURY, 
350, 4-barrel, automatic, air 
conditioning, garage kept, 
59,000 miles, new tires, runs 
good. $5,000. (847) 
746-1688. 

CADILLAC ELDORADO 

1970, LOADED CLASSIC. 

Excellent condition. Lost Stor- 
age. $2,700. (414) 654-7411. 

CHEVROLET 1950 
TRUCK Collectors Item, par- 
tially restored, $i,200/best. 
(414)656-1653. 

CHEVROLET MONTE 

CARLO 1972, sharp and sol- 
id. $3 t 645/best. (847) 
395-^899. 





568 



Qui Of Area Property 



SOUTH CAROLINA LAKE- 
VIEW BARGAINI $24,900 
Free Boat Sllpl Beautifully 
wooded lot w/free private boat 
slip on 50,000 acre recreation- 
al lake abutting golf course. 
Paved roads, water, sewer, 
more. Excellent financing. Wa- , 
terfront also, available. jCall, 
800-704-3154. 



TENNESSEE 

KENTUCKY 

LAKE PROPERTY 

Paris Landing, TN.- 
Magnificent view, waterfront 
subdivision w/amenlties. 
Wonderful place to build the 
home of your dreams. Enjoy 
all the beauty nature can pro- 
vide. For FREE Info, on River 
Trace II. Call: LAKE REAL- 
TORS, 1 -800-642*1 901 



1983 SEVILLE, NEW 

brakes/tires, sound system 
with amp. Must gol 
$1,400/b03t. (847) 249-5589. 

1984 CHEVROLET COR- 
VETTE 40,000 original miles, 
excellent condition. Virginia 
car, $10,500. (414) 653-^0693, 

1984 MERCURY COU- 
GAR, black with gray valour 
Interior, 302 engine, power 
windows, power locks, power 
seats, power mirrors, sunroof, 
tinted windows, many new 
parts. $1,700/best. (847) 
740-4291. 

1085 WHITE ELDORADO 
CADILLAC, new 

tlres/shocks/exhaust, clean, 
$2,000/best (847) 838-:1013; £J 



1994 325I CONVERTIBLE. 
LOADED, Mid. Bluo-groy 
leather Interior. CD changer, 
all power, all options Inc. rollo- 
ver protection, Excollont condi- 
tion, garage kopt, liko now. 
Serious Inquiries only. 
$32,900. (847) 587-4119 
leave mossago, 

1988 BMW R1100RT, rod, 
low miles, Corbln soat, Para, 
windshield, throttle look. 
$13,000/bost. Call after 4pm 
ask for Mlko D. (847) 358- 
2980, ' 

1998 GRAND AM, Vfl, 
power everything, oxlra clo&n, 
$16,500/bost. (847) 
623-4020. 

BMW 1082, 733I, modified 
new motor, many .other now 
parts, $2,500/boGL (414) 
694-3255, 



1989 FORD AEROSTAR 
XL, EXTENDED, 4 200/best. 
(647) 487-1861 after 6pm. 

1990 PLYMOUTH GRAND 
VOYAGER LE, only 78K miles, 
groat condition, $7,800. (847) 
223-1781. 

CHEVY CONVERSION 

VAN 1989, Lowner, air, tilt, 
cruise, AM/FM cassette, 
77,000 miles, $6,500. (847) 
587-8707 days, (815) 675- 
281 1 evenings. 

TOYOTA 1993 T100, 4x4, 
85,000 miles, runs super, zero 
ruBt, $l4,000/bost. (414) 
857-4629. 



828 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



S57 



Painting/Decorating 



1985 K-5 BLAZER 4x4, all 
full power, accessories, 109K, 
blue/grey, 4' lift, 33" tires. 
$3,900/bQSt. (847) 225-3311. 

1888 BRONCO II, 4 wheel 
drive, - groat shapo, 
$2,400/best. (847) 587-0856. 

1989 DODGE DAKOTA 
4X4, 3/4 ton, 6-cyllnder, good 
shapo, 130,000 miles, 
$3,300/best. (847) 587-7551. 

1993 CHEVY BLAZER 
4X4, LOADED, POWER 
STEERING, POWER 
BRAKES, POWER WIND- 
OWS, TILT, AIR CONDI- 
TIONING, ABS, 
$17,000/BEST. . (847) 
395-1838 LEAVE MES- 
SAGE^ 

1994 CHEVY BLAZER S- 
10 TAHOE, 4-door, 4- 
wheel drive, fully loaded, 
27,600 miles, Best offer. (847) 
689-4906. 

1984 CHEVY S-10 BLAZ- 
ER TAHOE LT 4x4, 4-door, 
leather, AM/FM/CD, fully pow- 
ered, electric dash, 34K, 
$17,800/best. (847) 

973-1105 leave message. 

1994 JEEP CHEROKEE 
SPORT, 4x4, 28K, excellent 
condition, $15,500. (847) 
746-4985 after 6pm. 

SUZUKI 1988 SAMURAI 
4x4, hardtop, 5-speed, stereo 
cassette, very clean, 
$3,000/best. (414) 884-9546. 



PRECISE PAINTING 
INTERIOR/EXTERIOR. 
*New construction or we 
can make It took like now I 
* Expert Wallpaper 
Removal 
•Wall Repair, 
•Ready to be painted 
or papered. , . 
Call ua about 
Spring Deck Specials. 
Reasonable Rates. 
Never. a charge for 
estimates. 
(847) 740-0726 . 
(847) 385-0490. 



S72 



Professional 
Services 



CAN YOU BELIEVE??? 

You can make $$$ and 

feal appreclatedll 

For cleaning homes or 

offices. I'll teach you how to 

start your own cleaning 

business 

In your home or mine. 

Fees Vary. 

Joan 

Mean Molds! 

Wo Hate & Terminate 

Dlrtli 



S87 


Storage 



INSIDE/OUTSIDE STOR- 
AGE, FOR boats, cars or 
campers, etc. Commercial 
building. Reasonable rates. 
(114)878-4341. 



834 



TruckvTrallers 



1993 TOYOTA T100 4x4, 
48,000 miles, regular cab, 
cap, bedllner, 5-speed, V6. 
Asking $13,500. (414) 
658-1505 Kenosha. 

CHEVROLET 1995 S-10, 

red, 16,000 miles, $11,995. 
(414) 694-8763. 

FORD 1994 RANGER, 

21,000 hlghwaymilos, au- 
tomatic, V6, air, am/fm cas- 
sette. Ashing $9,500. (414) 
654-7266. 



838 


Heavy Equipment 


POWER GENERATOR 
MAXA, like new. $275/best. 
(847) 244-9556. 


844 


Motorcycles 



1984 CUSTOM HARLEY 
DAVIDSON SPORTSTER, 
lots of chrome, 6' extended 
forks, S & S carburetor. Must 
see. $6,500. (847) 740-7380 
85k for Kim. 



S3D 



Firewood 



CAR TOW DOLLY (car cad- 
dy), will carry up to mid-size r 
car. Asking $750/best. (847) 
244-1581. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
bodies. Factory new, guar- 
anteed from $1,300. Doors 
from $89.00, lenders from 
$50.00, beds from $800, bed- 
liners $169.00. BUMPERS, 
GRILLS, REPAIR PANELS, 
PAINTS, ABRASIVES, WIND- 
SHIELDS, RADIATORS. Deliv- 
ery. Mark's 217-824-6184. 



*3 



FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hardwood oak. 

ash, maple cherry. $64.00 per 

face cord mixed. $74.00 per face 

coidKXMtoak. 

Free stacking and delivery. 

Bitylhewood (fiat's guaranteed to 

bunt 

(847)545-3613 •(815) 344-9522 
1-800-430-6262 



1 



FIREWOOD 

UNLIMITED 

Season •% years 

Free, Fast Delivery 

Prompt Courteous 

Servlcel Credit Cards 

Accepted 

Mixed Hardwoods $69 

F.C, Oak $78 

Cherry Birch Hickory Mix $84 

Discount on 2 or more 

1-630-876-011X 



S39 


Housekeeping 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 
'CUSTOM 4X4 JEEP New 
373 front and back gears. Now 
master cylinder, shocks, bat- 
tory alternator, chrome head- 
ers and J plpos. Lifted, contor 
lino rim9 33" tiros. All Jlbor- 
Qlass body...,Much-Much 
More. Must aoo. $5,200. 
(847)740-7300 ask tor Kim. 

OMC 1987 SAFARI, powor 
windows/door locks, air, 
AM/FM radio, 3-soats, mini 
van. Fully loadod. Clean. 
$3,500/bOBt. 53,000 mllos. 
(414)652-2309. 

JEEP 1989 COMANCHE, 
4x4, 4,0 liter, 6-epood, with 
cap, $8,500/bosl. (414) 
894-5342 boforo 1pm, 



BUSY EXECUTIVE? LET 

me manage your 'home while 
you work. I will do cleaning, 
cooking fresh meals, laundry. I 
will do It alll. (847)949-6451. 

HOUSECLEANINQ 

Bill-Joyce 

0nm-5pm. 

Monday-Friday. 

Senior rate. 

(847) 356-6876. 

I WILL CLEAN YOUR 
HOUSE on a woekly/bl-weok- 
ly basis. Vory thorough, de- 
pendable. Non-smoker. Refer- 
ences, (847) 546-8759 loavo 
mossago. 



[ Wq'II sell your camera in 

a flash, 

Your drum In a beat, 

Your clock In a mlnutel 

Lakeland CloflHlflc'dH 

(708)223-8161 



BS 



Tree/Plants 



M t MUMMM I MM 



TREE & STUMP 

REMOVAL 

Land Clearing 

Wholesale Seasoned 

Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

847-526-0858 



S99 



Miscellaneous 
Services 



TRICKY DICK 
SNOWPLOWING 

Small shopping centers, 

driveways and salting. 

Insured. 

(B47) 546-5363. 



| 



ATTENTION 
CLASSIFIED . 

ADVERTISERS 
IX you have placed classified 
advertising wilh the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request 
Uig payment for this advertis 
Ing. To receive proper cred 
II to your account, all pay- 
ments for your Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Ncwpapen 

PO Box 268 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Onjilike, IL 60030-0268 












f 



:> 



.-:" 









NovEMbER 1 , 1 996 . UktlANcJ Newspapers CLASSIFIED 











It's Our 40th 




versary, 

but von 

get the 

gift! 

Su&wuAe today <Mtd wceiw 
a AakdawL Seat tfutAwt i%eei 



/ 



Right now you can take 
advantage of home delivery of 

tHe best local liews and 

advertisiiig in Lake County and 
receive a takeland Seat 
Cushion as our sift to you! The 
Lakeland Seat Cushion is easy 
to carry and perfect for any 
event. If you ever thought of 
subscribing, now is the tune! 

Here's some of what 

you can expect in your 

paper every weelc: 

• Prompt Home Delivery 

• Award-winning Local News 

• Complete Classifieds 

• Local Sports 
•Entertainment 

• Lipservice 

• Monthly Special Features 

• School News 

• Local Business Info 

Offer available to new & current subscribers. 

Local delivery only. 

Expires 11-30-96 or while quantities last 

For more information, call (847) 223-8161 

* While supplies last. Not good with any other offers. 



Yes, I'd like to take advantage of a one-year 
subscription to the paper and receive a FREE 
LAKELAND SEAT CUSHTCW. I will receive 
52 issues for only 024.50; seniors 022.50. 



Name 



Address 



City/Zip 



Phone 



Visa/MC # 




Expiration Date 
Signature 



Mail with your check to: Circulation Dept. 
• Lakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box 268, Grayslake, . I L "60030. 

• Seat Cushion will be mailed when payment is received. 

□ Antioch News-Reporter Q Lake Villa Record □ Mundelein News 

□ Fox Lake Press Q Lake Zurich Enterprise Q Round Lake News 

□ Grayslake Times Q Libertyville News □ Vernon Hills News 

□ Gurnee Press □ Lindenhurst News Q Wadsworth News 

□ Wauconda Leader 



- .' V': '- 



E I I 



- ■ ji 






l > 






«v*J»j ■■ •■ 



aoi 



>>a 






riicji^'^.".*^~.~*-i. 11,1— 







CLASSIFIED UkelAMcl Newspapers NovemIier 1, 1996 



iaAMnd'rtiiJiffln.tuij.'iJUf'ii't^'iag 



; 



/ 
1 1 



ABBREVIATIONS 



Air conditioning - AC 
or 

Air. 
Anti-lock Brakes - 
ABS 

Automatic - . 
Transmission '- 

Auto or AT 
Average - Avg. 

B 
Battery - Batt. 
Between - Btwn. 
Black - Blk. 
Brakes - Brks. 
Brown - Brwn. 

C 
Carburetor - Carb. 
Cassette - Cass. 
Certified miles - Cert. 

mi. • 
Condition - Cond. 
Convertible - Convt. 
Cruise Control - 
Cruise 
Cylinder - Cyl. 

D 
Dealer - Dlr. 
Door(s) - DR 

lEngine - Eng. 
"Equipment/Equipped 

Equip. 
Excellent - Exc. 

F 
Financing - Fin. 
Four Wheel Drive - 
4WD 
G 
Garage - Gar. 

Hatchback - Htchbk. 
or 

HB 
Horsepower - HP 
Hardtop - Hrdtp. 

Immaculate - Immac. 
Interior - Int. 

K 
Thousand - K 

L 
Leather - Lthr. 

M 

Miles - Ml 
Moonroot - Mnrf. 
Maintenance - Mainf. 
Manufacturer - Mfr. or 

Mfg. 

Miles per gallon - 
MPG 
O 

Or best offer - OBO 
Offer -Ofr. 
Option(s) - Opt(s). 

P 

Power Brakes - PB 
Power Doors - PD 
Power Locks - PL 
Power Steering - PS 
Power Windows - PW 

R 
Radlals - Rad. 
Records - Rec. 
Rear Window Defog - 
RWD 
S 
Sacrifice - Sac. 
Speed - Spd. 
Sunroof - Snrf. 

T 
Tires - Trs. 
Trailer Hitch -Trl. 
Htch.* 
Transmission - Trans. 

V 
Very good condition - 
VGC 
W 
Warranty - Warr. 
Wheel(s) - Whl(s). 
White- Wht 
Whltewalis - W/W 
with - W/ 

MFCS BRANDS 

General Motors 

Cadillac - CAD 
Chevrolet -CHEVY 
Pontiac - PONT 
Oldsmoblle - OLDS 

JFord Motors 

Lincoln - LINC 
Mercury - MERC 



Chrysler Corp. 

Plymouth - PLYM 
Chrysler -CHRYS 
Dodge - DOD 

Other 

Volkswagon - VW 
Mitsubishi - MITSU 
Honda - HON 
Toyota - TOY 



It is Hearing the cold and 



•«• 



flu season 

Call Dave or Greg at 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 

to list your school 

in our Substitute 

directory section in 

classifieds. 




LEGAL 
NOTICES 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



223-8161 
TOI>AY 




LEVINGS 



siKsrsu 



Parents can cook dinner and still keep an eye on kids playing in the yard. The 1471 square foot 
Levings is Ideal for a family about to purchase their first home, or for a couple close to retirement 
and wishing to down-size to a more manageable floor design. 

Attractive wood siding and a covered walk Impart a nice touch as you enter this home. 
Tbe kitchen Is large with ptenty of counter space, and since It's just Inside the front door, handy 
for popping In to grab a snack. The open living room and dining room invite entertaining or family 
gatherings. The optional woodstove adds charm to this area. Sliding glass doors lead you from 
the living area to the covered deck for enjoying the warm summer nights and cool fall evenings. 

This home has a roomy master bedroom with a double vanity In the dressing area, separating 
the bathroom and walk-in closet. A skylight fills the dressing area with soft natural light. 

The den, with French doors, can be used as a home office, or guest room if needed. A full bath 
| room is located In the center of this floor plan, allowing for easy use by the entire home. 

The large two-car garage not only has a side entrance, but direct access into the house via the 
oversized utility room. This handy space houses the washer/dryer and a half bath. The half-bath 
is convenient to those working in the garage or yard. 

For a study kit of the LEVINGS (401-62), send $10.00, to Landmark Designs. P.O. BOX 2307- 
LP60, Eugene, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan name & number). For a collection of plan books 
featuring our most popular home plans, send $20 to Landmark, or call 1-800-562-1151. 
I — 







Ho Ho Ho 

Seasonal 

k Opportunities 

Are 

Here! 



I 



We will be running our special "Seasonal 

Opportunities" section from 10/4/96 - 12/31/96. 

For any 1x3 or larger ad placed in this section we 

will run the second week at HALF PRICE. 

Reserve your space today and get the best 

qualifed "Elves" for your seasonal needs! 



Lakeland 



Newpapers 



847-223-8161 xllO or 112 

Greg or David 
Fax:847-223-8810 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

FISHER AND FISHER 
FILE NUMBER: 29013 
IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, for the Northern District of 
Illinois, Eastern Division, Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation f/k/a Chemical 
Residential Mortgage Corporation, a New Jersey Corporation f/k/a Margaretten & 
Company, Inc., Plaintiff, -vs- Richard D, Mooney, et al. Defendants, Case No. 96 
C 4636 Involving a mortgage foreclosure concerning the following described 
properly: 

Lot 26 In Block 42 In Wildwood on Gages Lake, Sixth Unit, being a 
Subdivision In Section 29 and 30, Township 45 North, Range 1 1 , East of the Third 
Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof, Recorded August 17, 1951 as 
Document Number 735764, In Book 32 of Plats, Pages 53 to 55, In LakeCounty, 
Illinois. 

c/k/a 1 7836 W. Cheyenne Ct., Wiidwood, IL 60030. 
Tax ID #07-29-302-019 

ORDER 
THIS MA1TER coming to be heard on the motion of the Plaintiff for an Order 
directing the Defendants, Richard D. Mooney, to appear and fie their Answer or 
.otherwise plead to the Complaint to Foreclose Mortgage heretofore filed In this 
matter and it appearing that an Affidavit of Non-/residence Petition for Order of 
Publication having been filed herein, and the Court being fully advised In the 
premises; 

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that the Defendants herein, Richard D. Mooney, 
file their answers to otherwise pfead to .the complaint of Foreclosure Mortgage 
heretofore filed by Plaintiff on or before November 15, 1996. 

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that notice of this order be published In Ihe 
Lakeland Newspapers once a week for six (6) consecutive weeks. 
ENTER: JUDGE HOLDERMAN 
DATED: SEPTEMBER 20, 1996 
Elizabeth F. Kaplan 
Renee F. Meltzer 
Michael S. Fisher 
Arlene N. Gelman 
FISHER AND FISHER 
ATTORNEYS AT LAW, P.C. 
30 N. LASALLE STREET 
CHICAGO, IL 60602 
(312)372-4784 

1096A-302-GL 

October 4, 1996 

OcloberU, 1996 

October 18, 1996 

October 25, 1996 

« * November 1, 1996 

November 8, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The following parcels of property, acquired through the Tax Sale Certificate 
Program, are being offered for sale by the County of Lake. 

Written bids should be submitted to the County of Lake. Tax Extension Dopt., 
Room 101, 1B.N. County St., Waukegan, IL 600B5, 

Bids received will bo retained for 30 days after tho Initial bid. After completion 
of the 30-day period, the County has the right to accept the highest bid or to reject 
It If the amount Is insufficient or if the sale would not be In the best Interest of Lake 
County Taxpayers. 

Willard Rooks Helander 
Lake County Clerk 
60020 

05-15-400-027 
05-09-400-137 
05-10-100-203 
05-09-200-020 
05-14-112-013 
60041 

05-14-213-020 
05-14-213019 
05-14-213-017 
05-14-213-016 
05-14-213-015 
05-14-213-014 
05-21-201-033 
05-13-110-013 
05-13-110-012 
05*14-323-002 
05-12-100-023 
05-15-402-023 
05-15-402-022 
05-13-304-004 
05-16-306-025 
60081 

01-33-31 8-020 
01-33-318-019 
01-33-318-018 
01-33-318-017 
01-33-318-016 
01-33-318-015 
01-33-318014 
01-33-318-013 
01-33-318-012 
01-33-318-011 
01-33-323-002 
01-34-310-012 
01-34-100-001 
'01-34-120-013 
05-04-102-003 
05-04-102-002 
05-04-101-006 
05-04-101-005 
' 05-04-101-002 
01-33-324009 
01-33-318-010 
01-33-318-009 
01-33-318-008 
01-33-318-007 
01-33-318-006 
01-33-318-005 
01-33-318-004 
01-33-318-003 
01-33-318-002 
01-33-318-001 
01-33-308-008 
01-33-30B-007 
05-04-110-012 

1196A-373-FL 
November 1, 1996- 



INCORPORATED FOX LAKE 

27521 W. Chris Larkin Rd. 

Eagle Point Rd. 

S. Holly Ave. 

908 Lake Shore Dr. 

Whitten St. 

UNINCORPORATED INGLESIDE 

26277 W. Blackhawk Av, 

26279 W. Blackhawk Av. 

26295 W. Blackhawk Av. 

26301 W. Blackhawk Av. 

26307 W. Blackhawk Av, 

26319 W. Blackhawk Av. 

34955 N. Gogol Av. 

25848 W. Hillside 

25860 W. Hillside 

35184 N. Inglestde Av. 

36625 N. tola Av. 

27008 W. Longwood Dr. 

27016 W. Longwood Dr. 

25672 W. Marion Av. 

28565 W. Valley Rd. 

UNINCORPOR ATED SPRING GROVE 

38116 N. Burton Av. 

38122 N. Burton Av. 

38128 N. Burton Av. 

38134 N. Burton Av. 
38144 N. Burton Av. 
38156 N, Burton Av. 
38164 N. Burton Av. 
38170 N. Burton Av. 
38176 N. Burton Av, 
38184 N. Burton Av. 
38111 N.Channel Dr. 
38343 N. Dawn Circle East 
27733 W. Grass Lake Dr. 
27526 W. Greenwood Av. 

37971 N. Nipperslnk PI, 
37977 N. Nipperslnk PI. 

37968 N. Nlppersink PI, ' ' 

37972 N. Nlppersink PI. 
37906 N. Nipperslnk PI. 
38029 N. Nipperslnk St. 
38119 N. Nlppersink St. 

38123 N. Nipperslnk St. 

38129 N. Nipperslnk St. 

38135 N. Nipperslnk St. 
38141 N. Nlppersink St. 
38153 N. Nlppersink St. 
3S 1 63 N. Nipperslnk St. 
38169 N. Nipperslnk St. 
38175 N. Nlppersink St, 
38183 N. Nipperslnk St. 
38269 N. Stale Park Rd. 
38273 N. State Park Rd. 
28977 W.WestlaneAv, 




b';- 




FL 
96 



NovemBer 1, 1996 Uh\md Newspapers CIASSIFIEP 




P«t 




Pawd« 



"r t 






PET OF THE WEEK 
SPONSORED BY: 

Dr. M.H. Dahler 
Beach Park Animal Hospital 
7063 N. Sheridan Rd., Beach Park.IL 
(847)244-1230. 

Dr. Dave Trask 

2595 E. Grand Ave.', Lindenhurst.IL 

{847)356-1516 

Grayslake Feed 

Center St., Grayslake, IL 

(847) 223-4855 



l new™- 

PRO HANI 



Greyhounds Only Inc. Adoption 

714 Hoidridge Ave.,Winthrop Harbor, IL 

(847)731-2511 

Hawthorne Animal Hospital : 

203 Rte. 45, Vernon Hills, IL 

1(847) 362-0780 
Purrfect Pet Care ■ 
Antioch, IL 
(847) 838-LOVE 

Wal-Mart Pet Dept. 

772 E. Rollins Rd., Round Lake Beach; IL 

(847) 546-0043 



| There's no place 
I like home 

g Although kitten season normally ends in 
^September, Orphans of the Storm still has a 
glpvely variety of adorable kittens, from eight 
gjweeks of age and older, available for adoption. 
gThe selection Includes some semi-long hair as 
gwell as short hair kittens in various colors and 
^patterns. These kittens are. well socialized, 
^affectionate, full of playful "cat"-sonality, and 
Meager to go to a loving home and family, where 
gthey will thrive and grow into the beautiful adult 
scats they are destined to become. If you are 
^looking for a darling 
sjtens at Orphans o, 
^November and winter 



Q. I have a cat for 12 years that was litter box trained. I recently 
purchased a kitten and now my cat is not using the litter box. What 
causes this and how do I correct the problem? 
Watching my step, Grayslake 

A. This problem can occur in multi-pet households as well as in 
a household with a new pet brought In. As long as no medical con- 
dition has occurred due to the stress of the new pet being brought 
into the home, a second litter box in a different area may be rec- 
ommended so that they do not have to share the same box. Now 
that your cat has started a habit of urinating outside the litter box 
you may need to keep it in confined quarters with the litter box for 
a period of time in order to recondition it to using the box. Also, be 
sure that you have treated all the areas thoroughly that the cat has 
urinated in to remove all the odor. (Remember cats have a much 
better sense of small than we do.) By treating these areas you are 
discouraging the older cat from using these "accident spots." 
Removing the odor with a good chemical changeover compound 
will prevent the hew kitten from eliminating on these same spots. 

Q. I am a Chihuahua owner and my dogs,eyes weep constantly. 
There is no infection nor does she show any discomfort. I've 
noticed this in other Chihuahuas. Is this a trait of the breed? Should 
I discuss this with my veterinarian? 
Shed ATear, Antioch 

. A- Many small breeds of dogs have excessive tearing. Your DVM 
should make sure the tear ducts are open and working by flushing 
. the ducts before you give up and accept this as a fact of life. The can 
also have inherited conditions such as entropion or ectropion of 
the eye lids which rub the eyeball excessively or trap airborne par- 
ticles under their eyelids and cause abnormal irritation levels. 

Q. I have one dog and two 

cats, what kind of diseases can 

\ they give to each other? — RS., 

PIT OF THF WFFIf & LakeVilla 

J CI \Jl It WLtBV g A. There are several medical 

» and parasitic problems which 

g can be transmitted from dog to 

% cat or cat to dog. Among the 

, S most common are fleas, ticks, 
g ear mites, intestinal parasites 
» (worms] and ringworm. A 
S quality flea and tick preventa- 
^ tive used on all pets can help. 
jS& To control intestinal parasites 
« we suggest having your pets 
§ stool checked every 6-12 
8 months to make sure they are 
S not carrying parasites and by 
fe keeping both your yard and lit- 

. « ter boxes clean and free of ALL 

"*» nrtitm! 




Dr. Trask 



Ask The Vet 

Ask the vet-Dr. David Trask is 

part of a group of northern Lake * 
County veterinarians who pooled 
their money and expertise to 
start All Creatures Emergency 
Hospital in Grayslake providing 
emergency care to pets nights, 
weekends and holidays. During 
the day he can be reached at 
Lindenhurst Animal Hospital. 





Orphans of the Storm is located at 2200 Riverwoods Rd., Deerfield. Hours are 1 1 
j^am - 5 pm, seven days a week. Call (847) 945-0235 for further information. 



8 ondary to 

^ health/medical 



another 

problem. 

^ Upper respiratory infections 



g, — _ f...., __, — \- -i — - — « upper respiratory miecuons 

m%S$S&0!S&0$$sysX$S^^ are common and pass back 



and forth from one pet to another. 

Q. How fat is too fat before my cat has to go on a diet? 
— M.M., Silver Lake 

A. The rib cage should be easily felt by running your hands 
down the sides of the cat But before putting your pet on a diet, 
you should consult your veterinarian for possible metabolic 
problems that may be causing the pet's overweight condition. 
If there is a metabolic problem, changing of the food may be 
inappropriate. Cats that are severely obese and can no longer 
clean themselves adequately develop other problems such as 
urinary tract infections due to excess bacteria developing and 
remaining in the hair. Untreated conditions can lead to obesi- 
ty too. Cats are famous for liver conditions where fatty diets 
have displaced healthy liver cells, to the point of being life 
threatening. 

Q. Can you catch salmonella from a turtle?— Benjamin, Cub 
Scout Pack 91 

A. Yes. Several reptiles have been found to carry salmonella and 
this dangerous bacteria can be harmful or even fatal to 
humans and pets. Washing hands well with warm water and 
soap after every handling of pets, cages, and litter will help 
decrease the chances of transmission. Also, keep animals away 
from the kitchen and food products, or food preparation sur- 
faces such as counters, cutting boards and the like. 

ATTENTION ALL 
PET ADVERTISERS! 

Don't miss out on our 

Coming December 6th. 

This is your chance to promote those 
special gifts for Fido and Fluffy. 

Call Greg or Dave at fe* 

(847) 223-8161 

Deadline is Nov. 29th. fa ggf 1? 

. SS5S I f. 




Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



TO PLACE 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

847,223=8161 



>□ 



-Sir 

□ □ a \\- 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



FREE CLASSIFIED AD'S! 

NQ FEE TO SEARCH! 

LOW FEE TO SELL! 

NO SIZE OR ITEM LIMITS! 

NO DEADLINES! 

CHANGE OR CANCEL ANY TIME! 

. SAVE TIME AND MONEY BY 

LISTING WITH US! 

CALL ONE OF OUR OPERATORS 

TODAY FOR DETAILS! 

COMPU-AD 
847-587-0411 



Seal Coating 
Fall Discount 15% off 
Insured Free Estimates 

•Quality Sea Imasler* Products 
•Sealcoaling By Hand 
•Prevents Oxidation 
•Resists Gas & Oils 
•Wcathcrproofs 
•Beautifies Pavements 
•Low Maintenance/Economical 

Locally Owned & Operated 

PAYLESS PAVING 
847-360-8013 



FANTASTIC 
FIREWOOD 

2 yr. old seasoned hard- 
wood oak, ash, maple, 
cherry $64.00 per face 
cord mixed $74.00 per 
face cord 100% oak 
Free stacking & delivery 
Buy the wood that's 
guaranteed to burn 
(847) 546-3613 
(847) 344-9522 
1-800-430-6262 




CREATIVE EXTERIOR CONCEPTS, INC. 



C9 Save 10% Up to $500 

•' Siding -/V . Roofing 

• Vinyl Windows 7 m • Soffit & Fascia 

• Bays & Bows 't •Gutters 

• Patio Doors * 4 * n • Doors 

Licensed, Insured and Bonded 



(847) 726-1060 



,**********! ***************************************** 



•WE ARE BACK* 

1 



Juil whal )tju have been looking for. 
fe|) yiiur socks up. 

$10.00 per pair 
2 pairs for $19.00 

Sem First Class Pre-paid 
I Include name & addrcu) 



Send check or " 
money order to: 

STAY UP 

P.O. BOX 1 505 

MORTON GROVE, IL 

60053-7505 




I 



PRIME/TAR 

Digital Satellite 
No equipment to buy! i 

Ask about our 
$99 or LIKE FREE 
installation 

708-335-8110 

*************************************************** 



FLOORS U WALK ON, i 



inc. 



carpets • Hardwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 

Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling 
Residential & Commercial Installation 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

FREE 
ESTIMATES 

(847) 35G-2500 

(847) 310-5220. 




.UL-I-I-JU 



r. ^M^ ' -u 1 wat 'i 






■IS! 



S^ 



'■■LUflW. * " " ■ " 



r 
f 

r 

I ! 
t . 

< 
■ 
■ ■ 



, 



■ 




JJ CLASSIFIED LftltEJANd Newspapers IMovtMbtw 1, 1996 



— Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



^^♦*^*^***^^+****************'J 




*> 

4b 
4» 



■0 



Palnting^aUmpering 
ExperlllJ^tttUatlon 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services $ 



DEC 



ATM 

...complete... 

PAINTING & 
DECORATING 

COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL-INDUSTRIAL 

40 YEARS OF SATISFIED 

CUSTOMERS/ PROMPT AFFORD* 

ABLE PROFESSIONALISM 

FULLY INSURED...FREE ESTIMATES 

(847) 546-7926 



-JL^», < . jjL~~+-tA~—X—Juf^- 




WOOD 

Mixed Seasoned 

Hardwood. 

$65 a face cord 

delivered and 

stacked. 

Call 
(84 7)566-9372 



4k 
4> 
4b 





* 



*************•>•>•>*>•>*•>•>*>*•>•>■>*•>•>*** 



BLACKTOP PAVING 

Driveways Built, Repaired & 

Extended At Affordable Prices 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Grading, Leveling, & Excavating 

GRAVEL DRIVEWAYS 

Built, Repaired, & Extended 

| BLACK DIRT & TOPSOIL | 

Sand Gravel SlaDfl_Clav Fill 

D.E.R. ENTERPRISES 

lDon Rowden OWner • Call Anytime] 
1(847)546-8334 (647) 546-4500 1 



GINO'S 

■ .- ■' ■ . 'V ■■;-■::■?■>,:■ ■■■■' -. - ■■ :-.- '- ■..■■ 

DECORATING 

fainting & Staining 
Call New ' 
i Free Estimates 
• Affordable Rates 
Fully Insured 
Quality Work with 
Written Guarantee 

526-ZI07 



ROOF 

REPAIR 

1/2 Down, Balance when Leaks stop. 

Reroofing-Tearoffs-Flats 

♦Will meet any comparable price* 

♦TUCK POINTING* 

Cutter cleaning, siding repair 

and gutter repair. 

ALL TYPES OF HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 

Stale licensed, Liability workmen's comp. 

(847)838-0353 

NO JOB TOO SMALL 

8 



• •• LOW RATES ••• 

HEANEYS INSIDE 

RV STORAGE 

$12.00 per ft. 20' or under 
$13.00 per ft. 21' or over* 

•Also applies to Trailers & Motor Homes 

Cars - Popups $35 per mo. 

■Storage Available on other R.V.'s + RW.C 

(847) 587-9100 



J 



JACK'S 
REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

Siding * Soffit • Windows 

• Kitchen • Decks 

• Bathrooms 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 

(847) 546-3759 



OUR 

QUALITY IS 

EVERYWHERE 




BASEMENT SPECIAL 



$500 M 
OFF 

« i:h coupon 

Flniihing or Remodeling any 

Giscmcnl valued it 

SJ ,500 or more 

Explrts 12-1-96 



KITCHENS & BATHS 



A-AMERICAN 



$250 M 



OFF 

with coupon 
Remodeling any Bith or Kitchen 

valued at SI ,500 or more • 
Expires 12-1-96 




PAINTING 
HOME IMPROVEMENT 

(847) 949-9592 

COMMERCIAL & 

RESIDENTIAL 

Q{ rifjiurxlryje hrt-j 
bo*) 0W»an 

NO JOBS TOO SMALL! 

• * QUALITY WORK* 

REASONABLE RATES 

* NX WOm GUARANTEED * 

* INSURED i 



FALL PAINTING SPECIAL 



PER ROOM 

Libor Only • *[lh coapon 



Filling holci or crjeb -Prime ml 
piniing • One color 

Expires 12-20-96 



TILE SPECIAL 



JwTtn coupon 

Any Tile Work- 
{ Kitchen or Baths 

! Expires 12-20-96 



From architecturally designed 
exteriors to energy-efficient 
construction...you get quality and 
value with a Wausau Home. Come 
in, let's talk about your new home! 



RECYCLE! 

Cash For 

• Aluminum Cans 

•All Other Scrap Metals 

Industrial Accounts Welcome 

Chicago Surplus 

11304 260th Avenue 
Trevor. Wl 



Price Subject To Change 

LOCATION: Tievor. wi (5 minutes 
North of Antioch) Take Hwy C one 
mile west of Route 83 Turn North on 
2591 fi St . Veer to led lor 2 blocks (next 
lo Fony's Tavernl 

Mon. - Fri. 8:30 am • 5 pm 
Saturday 8:30 am - 3:30 pm 




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County Line Builders 
General Contractors 

437 S. Main St. 
Wauconda, IL 60084 

(847) 526-4663 
Mike or Scott 




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George's | 
Decorating | 

Paint & Wallpaper j 
Interior & Exterior !-- 
General Repairs 
Quality Work 
| Free Estimates 

Written Guarantee I 

I (847)348-5110 I 

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■A 

WliLCOME 

HOME 

CLEANING 

WE'LL CLEAN 
YOUR HOME 

quickly, thoroughly,- at a price 

you can afford. Call Welcome 

Home Cleaning at 

(847) 26 5-7366 
for a free estimate. 



JDECK SAVERS + J 



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INFINITE INTERNET SOLUTIONS 

Your Competition is on the Internet-are YOU? 

• Internet marketing for small to midsized businesses. 

• Business & personal Internet research 

• Internet training & support 

Contact IIS to find out how you & your business can benefit from 

today's most powerful tool for business & personal advancement. 

(847) 546-6204 



jzcmba@iwc.net 

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CONSTRUCTION * GENERAL CARPENTRY 

•Custom Decks 

•Porches •Room Additions 'Basement Remodeling 
•Bathrooms - Kitchens •Custom Carpentry 'Improvements & Repairsl 

INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414)889-8442 

Please Call Gary Kolkau 










Pressure Washing 
Restoration - Staining 

•Decks •Siding 

•Fences »Docks 

Pressure Treated Wood is 
Not Weatherproof! 

INSURED 

(847) 395-8428 



* 

* 




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Maple Leaf 
Tree Service 



Commercial /Residential 

•Tree Trimming 'Tree Removal 
•Lot Clearing •Seasoned Firewood 
•Stump Removal 

L. Horton 

(847) 726-8653 




40 years of 
ersortal service 



1 



dock 

instruction inc. 

• custom homes • basements 

• design services • remodeling 

• additions kitchens 
•.decks ' baths 

fully insured 526-150P 

free estimates Wauconda 

General Contractors 



TOP PRICE 
PAID 

We pay more for old or 
scrap gold. No amount 
too small or too large! 

(847) 
438-0125 




ACE COMPUTER SERVICES 

We teach you the Internet. 

1 on 1 training 

Your place or ours. Can teach 

you on our computers. 

Appointments available now. 

We do upgrades and servicing. 

We can backup your data. 

Reasonable rates, call now!! 

Spring Grove, IL 

847-973-2037 



I CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVlCElff 
/ ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR^ 
/ "Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 
33265 N. Rte. 45- 
Wildwood, IL 60030 
(847) 223-4682 
RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 



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-AUTO LOANS-- 

As low As $99 down 

Auto dealer will arrange 

financing even if you have 

been turned down before. 

Loans available for no credit, 

bad credit and bankruptcy 

buyers. No cosigners needed. 

Call Becky 

847-587-2055 



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New Century Remodeling 

(since 1955) 
• Roofing 'Aluminum siding/ gut- 
ters "Brick work *Ccment work 
•Carpentry 'Thermal windows- 
double hung, bays, bows St sliders. 

t< Free Estimates 
tfr Finance Available 

m "(847)680-1455 




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Performance 
Power 
Wash 



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•Homo 
■Business 
■Driveways 
•Wood Decks 



Spring 
Cleaning 
15% OFF 



Free 
Estimates 

Fully 
Insured 

USE CABOT SEALER 
Wood Docks and also Seal Decks 

PHONE 815/363-9606 
PAGERtf 815/-294-5988 



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HO ATTORNEYS, FAST, SIMPLE, HO WAITING % 

BUSINESS PLANS - RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 

WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 

(847) 548-1300 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 

SIDING &TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS • DOORS 

DECKS* AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 

(847)438^634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



DON7 THROW AWAY j 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR^ 
LAMP DOCTORS/ 
FOR REPAIRS. 

L WARREN ELECTOCWdT 
33261 N. Highway 45 
Wildwood, IL 60030 
(647) 223-8691 



I i 






NovEMbER 1, 1996 UkElANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 







ANTIQUES, CRAFTS & FLORISTS • ANTIQUES, CRAFTS & FLORISTS 






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** Maliday, Cnaft Snow **> 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16TH - 10:00 TO 4:00 
& SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17TH - 10:00 TO 4:00 

HEATHERRIDGE COMMUNITY CENTER 

5900 HeatherRidge Drive, Gurnee, IL 

Enter from Rt. 21 or Gages Lake Road. 

Door Prizes 
Hot Lunches & Quilt Raffle 




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'* i 

]J Weddings • Annhwxuy s * Birthday Parties £ 
jj Shmms •Christmas and New fan Parties £ 
Bal and Bar Mitzvahs r 

For More £ 

^ Information Call r 
^ 4U<}-8S5)-W0- > 
^ Ask for Melodi r 
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ladder's Garden Greenery 



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Wauconda Park District 
presents 

Holiday 
Arts & Crafts 




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Saturday Nov. 9, 9-4pm 

Sunday Nov. 10, 10-4pm 

Admission $1 .00 - No Strollers, please 

Start your holiday shopping & decorating here. 
Browse through over 50 craft booths. 
Enjoy a lite lunch at our Holiday Cafe. 

Wauconda Park District N 
Community Center 
600 N. Main St. "| 

Wauconda, IL I 

(847) 526-3610 j§ 



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W.P.D. 

Comm. 

Center 




invites you to our/Annual Christmas 
Sunday, November iq 

• Poinsettias & Poinsettia Trees 

• Christmas Arrangements and Center Pteces 

•Handmade Gifts and Holiday Decorations 




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£$r 



- •Fresh an 

Please 

l^iDERsilfeni l 

GARDEN GREENERY INC. liiil fH 

: h3JJ 



Sjj|tftr^ HOURS 
" ^Mon.-Fri. 9 to 6 
Sat. -Sun. 9 to 5 



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Phone: 223-2422 

Located 2 miles north of Grayslake on the corner of Rte. 83 & Lake Street. 






Big Hollow PTO presents... 
The 8th Annual 

"efwiAtma*, at tfiz 3ia££ow&" 
Arts & Crafts Show 

Sat Nov. 2nd, 1996 

Rts. 134 & 12 

9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

*50 Craft-awe* 



Crafters 1 





^ 



GRAYSLAKE 




Lake County Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
llinois 120 & U.S. 45 

Saturday & Sunday 
NOV. 23 &24 

10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. 

ADMISSION $2.00 

Lake County Promotions 

P.O. Box 461 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

847-223-1433 





yeatouLoy Once Htm 1pS|fe 

[Antiques and Collectibles Mall 
GRAND OPENING! 

of 10 Dealer Antiques and Collectibles Mall 
299 W, Belvidere, Grayslake, Illinois 
Open for business November 1, 1996 
10:00 AM to 5:00 PM seven days a week 
To introduce you co the Antiques and Collectibles Mall, deal- 
ers will offer all customers a 10% discount on items pur- 
chased between November 1, 1996 and November 10, 19%. 
(Some restrictions apply.) 

•Plate hangers • collectors books • periodicals • 

stamps • sports cards • coins • assortment of 

collectors and dealers supplies • 

(847) 543-1415 



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#7. 




Baballoons will decorate 
your Christmas party or 
Holiday event with creative 
and affordable balloons. 



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Beanie Babies.. 
• are here! 

• Clothes 

* Chairs v- 
L: • Beds 



384 Lake St. • Antioch 
(847)395-5550 



• Portraits from Photos 

• Personalized Books & 
Baby Blankets 

•Albums 

• Holiday Sweat Shirts 
m X-mas Tree Skirts 
and much, much more! J 




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Hours: fm 
M.F10-6 '■■ 
T, Th 10-8 
Sat 9-5, Sun 1 1-4 
Closed Wed! 




Gift Certificates & LayawayAvaSatle 
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Bth Annual 

CHR/STMAS 

ARTS & CRAFTS 

BAZAAR 

PRESENTED BY 

WARREN TOWNSHIP 

SENIOR CITIZENS 

SATURDAY, 

NOVEMBER 2ND 

9:00 AM - 3:00 PM 

'WARREN TOWNSHIP 

CENTER CITIZENS 

BUILDING 

'* 17001 W.WASHINGTON ST..' 

Aj CURNEE.IL 

: %J 244-1101 % 

LUNO I & BAKED GOODS 

PROVIDED BYi 

WARREN SENIOR CLUB 

. CHRISTMAS 0[lN,\MENTS 

\ HANDCRAFTED ITEMS 

WOODEN TOYS& 

MUCH MORE! 





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AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



5th Annual 



"Stmterfy Matidaif." mm 



* . 



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Sponsored by the St. Gilbert Women's Club 

Saturday, Nov. 16th - 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Admission is FREE 

Nearly 60 crafrers selling seasonal & holiday 
handmade crafts. 

Shoppers may also purchase lunch, instant raffle, homemade 

baked items & partake in silent auction alt at reasonable prices. 

St. Gilbert Parish Center and Chapel Hall 

251 E. Belvidere (Rte 120) 

Grayslake, IL 

For more information, call Linda Russ at. 

(847) 223-4540 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



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^^^^^srsawr^sfi ;; s^- r ^--'---- • 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkElANd Newspapers NovemBer 1 f 1996 



i 1 "' uilj ~ "= 





WIN 4 TICKETS TO THIS SHQW! 

HERE'S HOW TO WIN: 

Send this completed page in by Tuesday, Nov. 5, 1996; 5 p.m. 

Winners will be judged and awarded on Wednesday, Nov. 6. 
All winners will be called that day and tickets will be available 
for pick-up at Lakeland Newspapers. A total of 36 tickets will 
be awarded. 1st, 2nd, 3rd places will be awarded in the follow- 
ing categories: 

Ages 4 to 6; . Ages 7 to 9; Ages 10 to 12 

No purchase Decenary: Employees and families of Lakeland Publishers are ineligible to win, 



C^C#J^CJjjIJ-^Cj C^CJJ^JLJb^i 



NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY. 



STATE _ 
PHONE 



ZIP 



AGE 



W03296D 



SEND ENTRY TO: 

Coloring Contest 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney Street 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslakc, IL 60030